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It's difficult to help you troubleshoot a device, without a bit more information about it. Since you're not giving us much, I'll try to give general advice. Depending on the system, there's a few things that could be wrong. Gas Valve Closed This would affect every type of gas fireplace. Test: Locate the gas valve. Turn on the switch. Listen for the ...


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Is the pilot lit? The wall switch will not turn the fireplace on if the pilot is not lit. Here is some general information regarding how gas appliances work (the source link below also has some pictures): Most gas appliance will have a gas valve, a thermocouple, a thermopile, a piezo, and a pilot light. These parts are used to light and control the ...


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After ensuring that the gas supply is not shut, cycle the on/off switch several (maybe numerous) times to free the system of air. You should hear the electric ignitor clicking for a short time after each time you activate the switch. If you don't hear the ignitor- stop (you may have an electrical issue). If a strong smell of gas develops- stop (you may ...


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It sounds like the gas was turned off somewhere. Generally, there's a knob next to the fireplace that may require a tool to turn on or off. You may also need to bleed air out of the gas lines, perhaps try the on/off switch over and over a few times and see if anything changes. It's pretty straight forward and you would smell the gas if there were a leak.


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If the buildout is raised off the ground then siding or other sheathing used to cover it. My new home has similar set up and when I checked there were gaps up to half inch around a poorly cut piece of scrap siding. The hearth is tile and very cold all the time. My plan is to pull the siding panel off that off and use a layer of fiberglass. Then reinstall new ...


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I had the same problem, tried everything, replaced the switch and the thermopile, no avail. Then finally I removed the pilot light assembly, the top just pops off and using a straw blew a bunch of dust out of it. The result was a better flame on the thermopile which allowed the valve to open, try that.


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You could probably install tile backer board right over the brick. Apply thinset to the brick and backer board to make sure it bonds. Then attach it with backer board screws. If those don't go in, then you can use a few masonry screws to hold it until the thinset cures. That way you can square up the opening and have a good flat surface to tile to. Once the ...


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Use fire glass. The glass will heat up and radiate the heat out to you.


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I would get some plastic sheeting and tape it up all around the front of the fireplace real good so no air comes through. Use good quality duct tape. You could use clear or black plastic. You could also use color plastic for special holidays. Red or Green for Christmas, Orange for the fall, pastel blue or yellow for Spring.


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You can build an inexpensive "plug" for the front of the fireplace. Get some thick plywood cut just barely smaller than the opening of your fireplace. On the back of the plywood attach thick styrofoam or the foam insulation panels cut slightly bigger than the plywood. Attach a handle to the front of the plywood and paint any color you want. Stuff this ...


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You want something with close to the same thermal and moisture properties as the rest of the surround. Best wound be a piece of brick. You could bond it in with thin set since it is not really structural. If none are handy, you could use pieces of tile layered using thin set to glue it in. Just make sure none of the pieces stick out more than the brick. ...


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Burning wood in a gas fireplace constitutes a serious life-safety hazard. In General Using a fuel other than that for which a fireplace is designed may ignite a structural fire in the surrounding construction and/or discharge toxic gasses into habitable space. Discussion Gas fireplaces are fuel burning appliances. Each fireplace is constructed to ...


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Simply, you are not authorized to use the fireplace if you are ever going to forget to open the flue. If you can start the fire with the click of a remote I'd highly suggest leaving it open if you think you might forget. Perhaps a motorized flue control is in order (ideally one with limit switches that deny gas flow until satisfied-open). A CO detector goes ...


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A modern, properly installed fireplace should not require a mantle to catch smoke; they are purely decorative. I believe Nathan was referring to the glass doors and metal screen that an indoor fireplace does require to be safe. Also that the inspector may have been referring to the surround (protects the walls around the fireplace and is often topped by a ...


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Those stones are just facing and can be knocked out with chisel/hammer combo. The shelf might need a sledge hammer or a lot of whacks with hammer.


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We had a similar issue. The solution is to stack up larger chunks of lava rock into something that is vaguely pyramid shaped. As you note, the heat rises and if you have a large stack of rock over the flames, the rock will redirect this convective heat through the rock and heat up the rock itself. Once the stack of rock is heated (ours gets quite glowing ...


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That fire pit (if it is the one pictured) is not designed to put out a lot of heat—less than 15,000 Btu/hr. Even if you somehow managed to double that, it would not be all effective at heating people near it unless an enclosure were built. The output of these pits is little infrared (which is what is needed) but a fair amount of hot air, which just ...



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