Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

On most fireplaces I've seen (non-electronic start), a thermocouple provides enough power, along with the initial press/hold of the solenoid, to keep the solenoid open for the pilot light to remain lit. There is also a thermopile that provides enough power to open/close the solenoid that controls the main burners (on it's own, without requiring you to first ...


1

Some gas fireplaces with electric start have a thermopile that generates enough electricity to keep the valve open, even if you disconnect the mains electricity. So if the fireplace was on already and you disconnect the main power, I would expect the fire to stay on. However, starting by itself is not a good thing. I would look at two components: the ...


1

Short answer - not really. Electric insert is the only way to go if you don't want to mess with your chimney. A wood burning insert (or gas, or pellet) will certainly keep everything contained, but requires a functional chimney with proper venting. Most inserts require the chimney to be lined with a 6" diameter steel liner, although some smaller inserts ...


0

A natural gas/propane insert does not produce any smoke. It does produce CO2 and CO, which are vented up the chimney. You don't specify how small your chimney is, but they don't require a huge one. If I recall, my unit has a 4" duct. If the chimney is just a no-go then you could still install a direct-vent unit and vent out the exterior wall instead of ...


1

You can purchase fireplace inserts or individual fake logs used in those inserts that accept gel fuel cartridges. The gel fuel burns with very little smoke and may be a good alternative for your situation. Most major hardware stores will carry them or be able to order them for you. We have the same problem here and decided to use lots of colorful candles ...


1

How about a sealed wood-burning insert? All the smoke will go right up the flue.


0

I've seen some beautiful sets of different height pillar candles that looks quite nice. It may also still be possible to have a gas insert fitted, and a steel flue liner fitted up the original chimney.


0

You could install one of those fire simulators what has colored lights shining on a piece of translucent fabric that is fluttered around via a small electric fan. No smoke, no heat and low energy consumption. I've seen some of these that are amazingly convincing even fairly close up. You can find these also referred to as a "flameless fireplace".


5

Yes. These are painted all the time. I just used this for a traditional wood burning fireplace. You can search for fireplace paint but really you are looking for it to withstand the max temperature. Since yours is gas I am guessing your max is well less than 1000 F. Also most fireboxes are painted black so you can see the fire easier. And because of ...


2

I'd suggest having a fireplace person come on out and take a look. Sounds like you're getting a bad burn with excess moisture. It could be due to a variety of things: air intake (or exhaust) is plugged. Birds in the chimney? problem with fuel intake (leak? Kink in the line?) dirty burner element


0

The first thing to check is. Do you have a backflow preventing Cowl on the Chimney. These are quite effective in preventing backflow into your chimney. But the real problem is that you are getting a high pressure against your second story wall which is butting against your chimney pipe. Its a natural progression that the wind buffeting the wall will want ...


0

When you switch the lever to the left,it diverts some of the blower air back to the vent right under fire to keep it well oxygenated


0

As always, consult your local building codes, but there shouldn't be an issue with heat on a reinforced concrete column. Whoever draws the plans will need to figure out an appropriate way to tie the column and the chimney together.


1

If you are committed to not using the fireplace for the forseeable future, why not build insulated false walls on the sides, back and top? You could use 2" rigid foam insulation, which has an R value of between 13 and 15 (depending on whether you have an air gap behind it). All the edges need to be sealed with metallic tape to eliminate drafts. Then face ...


1

If this is a "Through the wall" fireplace (exposed brick on the exterior wall, which I think is what you are describing) then yes, it conducts heat very efficiently out of your house. Insulation and stucco over the exterior brick would probably be the most effective solution other than removing it if you don't use it.



Top 50 recent answers are included