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9

Remove the door knob and latch mechanism. Sand the damaged area, focusing on feathering down the edge between the old finish and the now unfinished areas. Start with an 80 grit and work in steps up to 120G or even 150G depending on how much you love this door. Be careful not to get too aggressive, this looks like a veneered hollow-core door and you want to ...


8

It's called a tarnish or patina and is caused by oxidation of the copper in the bronze. The sun's heat will accelerate that reaction somewhat compared to one in a cooler place. If you don't like it, simply clean the lockset with Brasso when it starts to look discolored. It will take some elbow grease the first time because the tarnish has had time to ...


6

I just got an answer by email from the owner of a company in France that specializes in artisanal plaster work. He recognizes it as a very thin lime-plaster that was applied with a bundle of leaves like these: with a whipping motion. He calls this type of finish an enduit fouetté which translates as whipped lime-plaster. He suggests that we mix a very ...


6

I would say that it depends on the type/brand of paint you are using. We have used eggshell finish paints from Benjamin Moore and Behr and it used to be true that eggshell was the easiest to clean. However, newer paint such Benjamin Moore's Aura is very easy to clean, especially their Bath & Spa paint. It's a kitchen & bath paint, but it has a matte ...


5

I would keep them the same if it's not too inconvenient. Different manufacturers (and even different batches from the same manufacturer) may have different drying properties (the Satin may come out differently). They may also have trouble adhering to one another which would lead to cracking between layers and may also yellow differently, producing a ...


5

If the rolling of office chairs is your major concern, consider putting urethane wheels or casters on your chairs. This type of wheel will not scratch or mar the floors further. These can be found at office furniture retailers. There is no way other than using chair mats, carpet etc. that I know of to protect a wood floor if you do not want to apply ...


4

Repairing these worn spots should be fairly easy assuming the damage is only to the urethane finish and not into the wood itself. This should be as easy as buffing the affected area with a green dish style scrubby to remove loose finish and slightly level the surrounding surface. If the scrubby is not quite aggressive enough, use some very fine 220 grit ...


4

I would use a dual action orbital sander and wet/dry paper @1200 grit a very wet sponge to dampen the area dont press down let the sander float and as the streaks are cut out the residue will turn milky, keep wiping and moving this high grit with water will leave a mirror finish, I have used 800 & 1000 to remove larger imperfections but the 1200 works ...


4

I think if you use a couple coats of good primer and a finish coat of enamel paint, you should be fine. Just be sure to work it into the wood well. Two thin coats are always better than one thick coat. The cat door is gonna protect the cut edges quite a bit as well. Put a small bead of silicone caulk on the inside of the cat door bezel before you install it ...


3

You can coat it with a satin clear finish. or even a matte finish. Both are available at most paint stores and big box stores.


3

60 year-old wood should not be "off-gassing." I suspect there's moisture behind the wood and you're dealing with mold and wood-rot. Did the home inspection note anything about it? I would hire a indoor environmental service to test the air near the wood to determine the problem. If it is moisture, you need to get the leak fixed, lose the wood, fix the ...


3

Drywall is typically used when a finished garage is called out on the plans. Even though drywall prices have risen quite a bit in recent times it is probably still the most cost effective material to close up open studs and ceiling joists in a garage.


3

It's possible it's just the cool temperature and it will dry in a few days. It won't hurt to let it sit several more days and see if the tacky areas harden up on their own. However my suspicion would be a compatibility problem between the urethane finish and the "green" mineral spirits. Although they probably say then can be substituted for real mineral ...


3

Most stucco/plaster patterns/textures aren't/weren't created by any particular tools but rather by incredibly highly skilled craftsmen. In other words, the pattern was created via decades of experience and skills rather than a particular tool. We have a stucco house and over the years I've talked to a few contractors and they all said the same thing...good ...


3

In most cases, if you have done all the right things like sanding and cleaning between coats, you should be done and have an excellent smooth glossy finish. Any further sanding or polishing with any kind of abrasive will dull the finish. Normally urethane does not need a wax. After some use and a good week or two of total cure time, a regular furniture wax ...


3

One thing to consider it that the blocks will be banged against each other and wall, doors, floors etc. so using a stain rather than paint might be the better option. It won't chip so will leave the blocks in better condition for longer.


3

Generally, yes - you can help protect the wallpaper with polyurethane. However, once the paper is on, it's not coming off without a complete overhaul (sand it all off and redo it), and you should be aware that paper tends to fade and yellow after a while. Also, if you use a brush to apply water based poly then you need to apply it kind of quickly and be (...


2

There are various oils to condition wood (lemon oil, etc), but they're just for keeping wood from drying out, etc. They are not wear protection. Nothing like a conditioning of the wood is going help your situation. There are no surface-patching compounds for wood floors that will tolerate a chair or anything like it from what I've seen. You have 3 ...


2

Why not build a drywall curtain. Base plate pinned to concrete floor with a few Tapcon type screws. Studs wedged between base plate and joists. If wider than 4 feet, add a vertical stud. Cover in drywall. NOTE THIS IS NOT CODE AND MUST BE TEMPORARY ONLY! Create a two or three sided room (but be sure to leave access, like a hinged plywood panel with a ...


2

You shouldn't need to strip unless you scratched through to wood. The problem with polyurethanes is that they are hard films that don't blend with the previous coat. Other finishes will 'melt into" the previous one (lacquer, shellac, tung oil) Your sanding, @220, was too aggressive. Intercoat sands should be at 320 - 400. You will have to sand back to a ...


2

Use 220G sandpaper to thoroughly sand the top, dust the top and also wipe lightly with a tack rag. Then apply a very thin coat of poly over the top. Do what you can to keep the dust from settling on it. If possible support a piece of poly over the top that will block the dust form dropping in the finish. Allow no drafts in the same room


2

Generally finish material runs just short of the edge of the box. There are box extenders to bring the box level with the surface of the finish material. Cut tile edges are almost always a bit rough. To have them as a visible edge is problematic. Plates overlapping tile edges is almost always better.


2

It's hard to beat Polyurethane for durability. I have had good success with both water based and solvent based versions. Get the stuff made for floors, probably two coats would do you. You don't want it too smooth or you'll die when it's wet. That is, unless you have small children, then I would suggest poured concrete ;)


2

You could try iron-on white melamine banding, usually used to finish the edges of particle board for cabinets or furniture. The banding usually comes in ¾" or ⅝" wide sizes, and it may be a challenge to find the banding in the width you need, but I know I've seen it in a few places.


2

You bought a pet flap made for a thinner door. There are pet flaps that come made for thicker doors that have an adjustment range that covers the thickness of door that you have. Some indeed will also come with a tunnel piece which gets discarded when installing on a thinner door. I would recommend returning the pet flap for one designed for the thicker ...


1

Use steel wool or plastic abrasive pads on it (after it's dried.) There are also "paint flattening agents" if you are looking for a chemical/additive fix for another coat.


1

It depends on whether the stickiness was caused by the ball leaving a residue on the finish or the ingredients in the ball (probably solvents) ate into the finish. If the former, you may be able to remove a residue using a wood cleaner like Murphy's Oil Soap (just one example). These cleaners are generally safe for wood finishes. If this fails, you could ...


1

We installed glass tiles in our kitchen last weekend, and used these spacers. The ones I picked up were black in color, if that makes any difference. Each provides around 1/8" of spacing, and you can add as many as you like to bring your outlet flush with tiled surface. With the adhesive mat + glass tiles we used, I had to use 3 spacers per screw. You may ...



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