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If you already bought (and can't return) 8 foot wooden posts and you want a 7 foot high fence (or "at least 7 feet") I would suggest not burying them at all, as that's doomed to failure. Put metal post bases (or metal posts) in the ground and bolt your wooden posts to them. Otherwise buy 10 or 12 foot wooden posts if you want 7-8 feet above ground and you ...


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I'd face-nail with a brad gun. 3-4 nails. Fast, easy, and likely stronger than the rear-facing screws. As a PS note that you will likely want to have diagonal brace on that frame to prevent racking as you remove the gate from the hinges.


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It will if you supplement it with construction adhesive. Put a dab on the back of each plank where it hits the bracing. Either overdrill the holes through the bracing so the screws pull the planking in, or use a clamp to hold the plank tight to the bracing until it is screwed in. An alternative is to use construction adhesive and hold the planks in place ...


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The answer to the above (I learned this after trying to actually do it) was this: you can not do it. this is not going to work, not in a decent or acceptable way There is two type of bolt down post supports like the one I posted in my initial message. The one that you are looking at in my initial message needs the concrete foot to be around 10" diameter ...


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If you haven't poured concrete yet, use "anchor bolts". (Ref: Simpson Strong-Tie Model # SSTB16-R, for a visual, though it's probably too long and wrong diameter.) I'd use ones around 12-16" long and as big a diameter as will fit. Get galvanized. Bolt them into the base (nut on top and bottom) and use that to maintain alignment while the concrete sets. Once ...


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Best thing I can suggest: Use a post-hole digger and dig as close to the other post as the concrete will let you get (without going beyond your own property line, of course). And don't set wood posts in concrete if you can avoid it (I've made that mistake; I've also done it right.)


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Having dirt touching the fence will increase the chance that the bottoms of your rails/pickets will rot. This doesn't necessarily mean your whole fence will rot; only the parts exposed to heavy moisture are at risk. Maybe you're OK with having a bit of rot on the hard-to-see part of the fence after a few years; how bad it is really depends on the wood, how ...


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There is no specific definition of what 'lightweight' would mean for a fence. But, in general, one could probably argue that a fence that is mostly decorative is lightweight. A 3' high vinyl post and rail fence would be lightweight. An 8' wood privacy fence would not. You might be able to use these, but I'd want them sunk into concrete so that you have a ...


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I think "light weight" in this context doesn't refer specifically to the mass of the fence, but rather the size and overall use of the fence. Just as an over-simplified example, a 3' fence in an enclosed non-windy area is going to be subjected to less forces than a 6' fence in a windy area. Generally speaking, if you want your fence to last, the best thing ...


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Before you start, talk to your neighbor first, get a feel for any concerns if any they have. Then inspect the post to see if it would hold a section of fence. Then go to it. EDIT: Ok lets try a different approach, dose your property line split the post, (red line), or meets it (green line)? This will make a difference. I would also consider placing a ...



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