Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

26

Couple inches of gravel. Place post. Level, plumb. Fill with concrete. Make sure that the concrete is graded away from the post so water runs off, this is an important step that lots of people overlook. Taking the time now to make sure water moves away from the post, will save time and money later when the posts don't have to be replaced. *Also ...


18

Don't attach the fence to the house. Aside from putting holes in your siding (not a good thing), your fence and your house will most likely move differentially. The attachment could result in a tear of the siding, which would be a bad thing. Place the fence post close to the house, then run the fencing top and bottom supports up to within an inch or so of ...


18

The most common failure with posts in concrete is "collar rot", where the post rots right at the point where it exits the concrete at the ground line. This can be easily avoided if the concrete is slightly above ground grade and domed or tapered away from the post so water doesn't lay against the wood. Drainage is the key, keep standing water away from the ...


14

Last summer we rebuilt our fence using advice from The Fence Bible. The advice was great, and the directions clear. The author covered both concrete and compact dirt/rock footers for wooden fences. I'd highly recommend it to anyone building a fence for the first time. Concrete does risk rotting the wood because of water build up, but that can be mitigated ...


12

The best solution is to add a dig-out guard to your fence or dog run: Head to the home improvement store and pick up some galvanized sheet metal about 2 feet wide (corrugated or straight is fine; the stuff they use for roofing and sheathing outbuildings is perfect) With snips, a hacksaw or a Sawzall, cut the metal to workable lengths, maybe 3-4'. If it's ...


11

This all depends on soil conditions. Loamy soil with good drainage, the concrete is probably OK. Clay soil, the concrete doesn't really do anything short of trapping water against the wood. In both cases, many people suggest not using concrete at all. Instead, dig the hole deeper than the post and then add some gravel to the bottom. Insert the post, then ...


8

No -- an 18 ga. nailer is ideal for attaching small pieces of trim, like shoe molding/quarter round, inside your house. Outside, the nails will quickly rust and fall off -- they aren't galvanized, they are TINY, and they have little to no head on them. If you want to use a nailer, you need to use a framing nailer like Shirlock suggested. Make sure you use ...


8

An eight foot wide gate is going to be very heavy and most likely will sag and drag on the ground. I would recommend two four foot gates. As far as the foundation for your posts, to support a swing gate, they should be at least 36 to 40 inches in the ground and in at least a 12 inch diameter concrete sauna tube. Frost is not your enemy here, but rot and ...


8

Rule of thumb is that 1/3 of the post should be in the ground. A 6' fence should be sunk into the ground 3', so you'd need 9' posts. As Shirlock states, even that won't likely support an 8' wide gate. Two 4' gates would definitely be a better option. Perhaps the easiest solution, however, is to not even make a gate. Instead, build your fence and then make ...


7

How old is the house? If it's fairly recent, do you have any idea of what the property was like before being built on? It's possible that the builder put down a lot of fill, and there was a large amount of organic material in that fill, or that he just dumped fill on top of what was there - stumps, trees, etc. Depending on the composition of the fill ...


7

A fence post has very little vertical force...mainly just the weight of the post and panels it holds. Your driveway slab would work fine as a footing for that. HOWEVER, the primary force on a fence is typically lateral--especially a 6' fence. The reason posts are put into the ground is to counter lateral forces on the fence (typically the wind). I imagine ...


7

I like the buried chain idea. In fact, you don't even need to use cinder blocks. They make 'earth screws' which are large auger-looking thing that you literally screw into the earth. Typically used as playset tie-downs or party-tent tie downs. Alternatively, maybe attach a bar to one of the fence posts. I'm thinking one of the stainless hand-bars you'd ...


7

I'd get some Barbed Wire arms for the fence. Since a picture is worth 1000 words, However, the non technical answer is that it's legally your neighbour's problem. Depending on your jurisdiction, it might be legal to shoot the dog. Pitbulls are often great dogs. But they can also be awful dogs if owned by idiots.


7

Coyote rollers, won't harm children like barb wire, is effective, and can be home owner installed. A Coyote Roller is a patented ribbed roller that mounts to the top of your fence. When a coyote or other predator tries to jump your fence to attack your pets, it requires them to grab hold of the top of a fence. With Coyote Rollers in place, the ...


6

My first thought is a guy wire from the top corner of the post, with a turnbuckle in the middle to tension it up and pull out that lean in the post. It seems that if you don't do something like this, the only alternative IS to reset the posts, which is a lot of work. Hope this helps. This is what a turnbuckle looks like:


6

I lost about fifteen 'concreted-in' fence posts in a windstorm and noted two universal things: all broken posts broke off at the ground line, just above the concrete removing (pulling) the now useless 'anchors' is a beastly task, but once done, it's an easy way to re-do the posts and restore your fences in exactly the same place with no new digging. I ...


6

Your iron fence, like this: ... Is the more traditional choice. A fence like this is going to be very durable, generally only requiring a coat of oil paint every few years and replacing minor touches like the caps on the posts. These are also generally more aesthetically pleasing as they are typically installed as part of the overall decor of the pool. ...


5

If you stain it now, it will change the end color of the wood. You have to wait for it to turn natural, so either wait six weeks or put it up green. The outside environment will dry it faster than sitting in a pile. Reasons Green lumber accepts stain poorly, while older wood absorbs stains relatively well. The porosity of wood can vary greatly, even within ...


5

Cut the timber so it's flush with the top or just proud of the metal support. From the top, drill a few ½inch (12.5mm) holes as deep as you can into the remaining timber. Then with a "old" wood chisel cut away and remove the remaining timber. It's nearly impossible just to pull the timber post from the metal support as there are metal "wings" inside ...


5

Home Depot has a pretty good guide for building wire fences. If you prefer a post and rail look, you could always add a few rails to the design. It would make it look a little better and add some strength as well. The result might look something like this: (image source) I recently built my own garden fence from chicken wire and cedar. It managed ...


5

I think your first inclination was correct. You should cut holes in the driveway and install the posts at least 36" deep in a concrete footing. Trying to mount to the surface of the driveway will not give the support you need for a 6ft fence. Wind, snow etc are powerful lateral forces against a large section of fence and could easily topple it. The post ...


5

I understand that it would be difficult to dig holes for a concrete footing for your posts. Depending where you are located and the soil types, you could drive the posts in and still have a stable fence. If you are in an area with frost in the ground, I would encourage you to set them at least 3 feet deep if the soil is stable and compacted. The basic rule ...


5

Assuming this actually is dirt and not bleaching by the sun and some confusion on which boards faced which way... Go to Home Depot and rent a pressure washer. Test the pressure washer on a scrap piece of fencing before you use it on the real deal - if you get too close you could blast a hole in the vinyl - but it will remove the dirt. Quite amazingly so. ...


5

This is an interesting read: http://www.justanswer.com/structural-engineering/6escy-does-shadow-box-fence-significantly-less-windloading.html The engineer says that there is no reduction in surface area, and the gap between boards isn't significant enough to significantly alter the air flow. He also says that in reality, there may be a minor reduction in ...


4

How tall are your posts to start with? A 6 foot above ground post should have at least 2 feet in the ground in your area. I would be setting them in concrete so you have a good solid base and good ballast. A metal post in concrete won't rust as long as you dome the top of the concrete so water runs away from the post. I'll share a clever trick that ...


4

This answer is more a dog training answer than a DIY answer, but anyways.. All of the suggestions already provided are good for solving the fence problem, but ultimately, your dog will still try and dig, and might even injure themselves trying - especially if there is metal down there. My advice is to get a skat mat - this is a mat that puts off a mild ...


4

A concrete post/form in the ground with some sort of above ground post or embedded post in the concrete is the way to go. Depending on what you want from your fence, ie: privacy, security, looks, etc. will effect what kind of materials to use for the actual visible fence. There are many choices of composite materials and vinyl products out there that are ...


4

They make them. Not concrete blocks per se but other precast concrete units. You'll need to find out if you're local suppliers carry them or you have a precast stone manufacturer near you. The family of products you're talking about, which includes not only the half round but other shapes, are called concrete coping stones. That should help you ask around ...


4

The punch suggested by SpectralGhost is a good idea. If that doesn't work, you can make a jig with three pieces of 2x4. Screw the pieces together and drill a pilot hole for the drill bit (the dotted line) using the same size bit you intend to use on the pipe.


3

If you want the grey natural look anyway, I would not bother sealing it. Here in Southern California a cedar fence should last a very long time. The things that seem most likely to damage it (posts rotting out from sprinklers, insect damage) are not going to be helped by sealing, and you will have to redo the sealing frequently to keep it looking nice.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible