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1

If you have flexible piping running to the bottom of the faucet: turn off both the hot & cold the water supplies disconnect the piping from the faucet aim the hot water pipe into a bucket and turn the hot water back on (quickly turn it off, of course) repeat for the cold water side If you're getting water in the bucket, the faucet's the problem. If ...


0

See the threaded tube? There's a nut threaded on that, which holds the plate in place. Use a Basin Wrench (or any wrench you can fit in there) to loosen the nut (rotate the nut anticlockwise to loosen it), and the plate will slide out. If the nut is stubborn, and doesn't want to budge. A good shot of penetrating oil can loosen things up.


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Success I found something useful: Put the handle back over the handle and tighten the knurled cap, while holding the handle. - I hate 1 sentence answers, I write too many words, such is life. I also enjoy teaching when I can. Below is my 'real' answer, it is long, I do not intend to talk down to you, simply to provide as much information as I can. I hope ...


0

A basin wrench is NOT the correct tool to try to tighten the faucet mount nuts that you show in your pictures. Due to the nature of the valve construction another type of tool is called for to tighten these. The tool will look like a hex socket end but is able to slide up over the long mounting stud to engage the nut. Tools of this nature are often made of ...


8

What you're after is a tool called a basin wrench: It can reach up behind the sink and tighten those nuts.


0

Under the sink, you probably have a shutoff valve for the cold side of the faucet. You could tee off that to a hose bib. The hose bib would have its own closure (I personally prefer the 1/4 turn ones), and you could put a short section of hose on it. You'd probably want to figure out some way of clipping the end of the hose high up in the cabinet so residual ...


1

I think you have a "chrome" film over the faucet. It looks like the film has corroded badly. I have fixed shower heads with auto body primer (spray paint), spray paint for the finish, and then a gloss coat. This being touched a lot you can try painting it but replacement is probably the better option - and never buy any plumbing fixtures that aren't a ...


1

First of all, real "chrome" finishes are actually nickel. Secondly it is not a nickel finish, it is some kind of plastic or cheap metal engineered to look like nickel. Buffing with scotch brite might make the color more uniform, but the mirror look is probably gone forever.


2

Im am no expert in this topic, But I do clean metals often. I can only say what I would try. Most of the time the answer is just to polish and clean manually. From what I can see, you have relatively hard water, and you tried to clean mineral deposits off the faucet. The Vinegar was the correct application, however you are left with some residual mineral ...



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