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To me, just less expensive to manufacture. I bought and installed two faucets with the plastic braided hoses a few years ago, and the hoses no longer fully retract. Will replace fixtures and look for faucets with metal hoses.


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It's actually a Danze. I had to replace mine as my hot water would not shut off. After alot of investigating and calling different suppliers ex: Moen and Delta, I was directed to Danze 1-800-487-8372. I sent them a picture of the cartridge and it was theirs.


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If you haven't stripped the screw head, they sell impact screw drivers for just such a situation. Like this one. A tool like this allows you to strike the impact with a hammer while turning the screw. They use them for motorcycle cases with Phillips screws that otherwise would never come loose with hand pressure alone. It you could rent one for a few ...


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If that's a picture of your actual hose faucet, then you just need to use a screw to attach the handle! If that pictue is just something that you took off the net, how closely does it match your's? It's probably a #8-32 x 3/8" screw... probably 3/4" long.


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I would replace the entire sillcock (also called a stopcock, outdoor faucet, hose faucet, or spigot), because it looks like you lost the handle, too; in which case you should watch this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lj_nTbIWzfI, Or if you really intend to repair it, try this instead: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cALQ3PR7k30 Edit- One ...


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You have sediment in your pipes. Replacing the valve will not fix this. Try thoroughly flushing your lines through faucets that don't have aerators. Such as, the outside hose valves and utility sinks. Remove the aerators from other valves and flush those lines too. Then see if you get better flow. Good luck!


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For future reference, this tool is made for just that purpose: Basically, it's an easy-out for drain ends. Here's a link to one on Lowe's web site, albeit a dead one, but it's where I bought mine.


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What I ended up doing, was using a heavy duty pair of pliers to grasp on to the drain flange. Then another pair of hands, also using heavy duty pliers, turning the tail piece. I was originally trying to do this on my own, and couldn't grasp the drain and turn the tail piece at the same time. Extra pair of hands did the trick. It's also possible that I ...


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It's cheaper for a company to use in-house "off-the-shelf" parts instead of having multiple, specifically tooled assembly lines for each and every model of faucet. The "internal parts" are all likely to be the same. The extra manufacturing cost (we have to ignore whatever marketing says, and the effect of supply and demand*) comes from the fact that plastic ...



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