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Hacksawing across the threads will at least give you a spot to place a screwdriver in the slot you created. With a hammer, tap the screwdriver so that you are driving the fitting in a counter clockwise direction. Little by little you will loosen the fitting so it can be removed.


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I have an American Standard Cadet 2-handle faucet which does precisely the same thing. And don't feel lonely, I do the same as you too. lol I bet the final pesky dripping has to do with the associated residual layer of water on the inside of the pipes after the handles are turned off. Just like an upended ketchup bottle which is empty enough to no longer ...


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I know this isn't really supposed to be a "shop for you" kinda place, but the Moen Banbury 8 specs an 8-16" spread; the Delta Porter is 6-16". I'd suggest you tour your big box store and squint at the packaging to see what range you can cover.


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To add to the tools that can be used in this situation is the crowfoot. Use it with an extension and a ratchet. (flank drive style pictured)


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After some time looking for a proper solution, the only one I come up with is using a tubular wrench, and sawing the threaded supports that were too long. Maybe not the smartest workaround, but surely this faucet lacks a good design for assembling it. These are some tubular wrenches similar to the one I used:


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Is it leaking at the stem or is it actually leaking at the vacuum breaker? The breaker can allow a leak (or a gush) and the parts are replaceable (if you can find them - which you likely won't due to age). A plumber would suggest replacement as that is the quicker fix and cheaper since time is money. I'd replace that one with new and try to fix the old to ...


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The fastest solution will be to replace the whole thing. That is what a plumber will recommend.


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If the leak is around the threads themselves (you can tell vs gasket based on where water comes out), teflon tape (sometimes called plumber's tape) exists for this. It's readily available at hardware and home improvement stores, and very inexpensive. Just wrap it around the faucet threads a few time and screw the hose on and it will make a good seal. ...



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