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19

Screws: It doesn't sound like you're reattaching the entire floor; this is more like strategic intervals to solidify the fastening. Your nail/screw rate is not as important as if you were attaching a new subfloor from scratch. Glue and screw is popular for more reasons than just rhyming You're going through this effort to make it right. So do it right.


11

It depends on the type of mount. If it's an articulating arm mount, the bending moment at the wall is going to be a lot higher than if you're doing a flush mount. In that case the safest option would be to open up the drywall and put 2x4s inside the metal studs, and use the included wood screws to attach the mount to the new 2x4s. If this is a load ...


10

The hot-dipped galvanized requirement isn't for load, it's to prevent corrosion. For less load, you can get smaller nails. However, if you don't use the hot-dipped galvanized, then the chemicals in the PT lumber will cause a reaction with the metals in the nails and they will corrode much faster than if the nail was installed in non-PT lumber. Here's some ...


9

The velcro type product you posted looks like it has adhesive on both sides. The velcro itself would probably be plenty strong if the straps are large enough, but I suspect that adhesive on the wall would not work out well. It could fail too easily by simply ripping the top layer of paint off. Or, when you do want to move you are going to rip a big chunk ...


8

Screws. Nails will pull out over time.


8

Don't wait for the carpet installers. Find your worst squeaks, cut through the carpet and padding, and put the screws in there right now. Then you can hit any missed spots and otherwise stay out of the installers way tomorrow.


7

Looks to me like a drywall screw or nail has "bubbled out". It happens sometimes due to wall movement, especially with weather swings (like a real wet winter or a long drought). It also happens when moisture gets to a nail or screw and causes it to corrode. Hopefully your kinda new roof is not leaking. I don't see any signs of plaster discoloration ...


7

Poster putty is an adhesive, but supposed to not damage posters or walls. Similar products are sold under names like Sticky Tack, Mounting Putty, and Blu-Tack.


6

I hang my posters gallery-style. Get a piece of glass (or plexi) cut to the exact size of the poster. Buy some nice hanging nails and use them to rest the glass on - one at each corner. The nails pictured below have a really nice edge, hold the glass well, and leave very little damage to the wall. You can pick these up at a hardware store or a framing ...


5

Two nuts can be tightened against each other so that they won't come loose. A single nut can be tightened against whatever it's holding, and if that's wood, the nut can loosen as the wood changes size with changes in humidity.


4

The only way I can think of is to use a frame ;) You don't need to frame each poster, but create something like the advertising hoardings you see on bus stops (in the UK at least) where the frame can open and a new poster inserted. So what you'll need to do is get a piece of glass or Perspex slightly larger than the poster you want to hang. Then create a ...


4

Epoxy is required in home building. Especially when attaching a wooden stud to an adjacent concrete wall. Architects and Engineers will usually specify a rod depth and that they are set with epoxy into the wall. The epoxy can be rolled onto the rod extensively and then placed into the hole. You usually allow the rod to set with the epoxy for 24 hours before ...


4

To answer your last question - oak will last significantly longer than pine. It can be left untreated and will harden. If you do use oak then dowels will be the ideal fixing mechanism as metal, particularly iron, will stain the wood. See the answer to this question on dowel sizes for what size dowel to use. They should be quite tight and if you get it ...


4

Screws would be the more 'sure' solution, but if your nailer can handle ribbed nails like this: Or a spiral shank: they'll hold pretty tight.


4

Shutter-loks are basically vinyl nails with annular rings to grip. They are meant to be removable by snipping them, confirming that they have low strength. Why not simply use screws of a similar length? You need a weatherproof type, such as these which are recommended for shutters. You could also use coated deck screws which come in several colors and ...


3

Perhaps more important than the size of the screws (or other fasteners) is what they actually grasp. With any significant load, a screw will not hold by itself in tile or plaster. The tile will chip and the plaster will crumble. One possibility is to use an anchor through the tile and plaster that expands laterally. There are several types (plastic, ...


3

You can buy wood strips with a slit that (gently) grab the edge of the poster, distributing the weight across the width. There is a string that goes from end to end of the wood so you can hang it. These work great; my friend used to use them for his treasured anime posters.


3

Expansion anchors may split concrete if used too close to the edge.


2

I'd find mounding hardware with a wide base, then use the 't-bolts' to anchor them (it's a bolt with spring-loaded 'wings' that expand inside the wall to grab the back-side of the sheetrock). The wider the base, the better, as it will distribute the load over a larger area of sheetrock. As for tensioning, you really do want the turnbuckle, as the cable ...


2

Cats are just as capable of digging as dogs are. Dogs are capable of digging to get to a trapped and tasty treat. The best thing I can recommend, after years of work to contain psychotic dogs when they're outside, is to have a full enclosure -- top, bottom, all four sides.


2

250lb cable ties are made, yes. "industrial zip ties" seemed to be a pretty good search string for finding sources. Probably more the cold making the plastic brittle than the basic strength of the zip tie. They do make "large, industrial" zip ties (I've seen 3 feet long and half an inch wide, and they probably go bigger) but you'll probably get better cost ...


2

Depending how light your object is, a rare earth magnet will do the job nicely for some values of "light" and the particular magnet. Small ones are pretty affordable, hefty ones get expensive.


1

If the steel stud is of sufficient thickness/strength you could fasten it with self-drilling Tek screws. I would personally be more concerned with the weight bearing capability of the steel stud (assuming it is the lightweight steel studs commonly used in commercial build-outs in my area). Most ceiling fixtures (you use the term stud rather than joist so I ...


1

Epoxy! And you can do it to the paint, or scrape the paint off first. The later is stronger in general. Almost any common hardware store epoxy will do. And, should you change your mind, a good whap with a chisel and you can take it off cleanly.


1

Don't spray it with WD-40. It might lube it up enough to get it moving, but the oils in it will attract dirt and debris which will eventually lead to binding. If you want to try giving it a shot of lube, use a dry type silicone spray. Ratchet straps are not typically a disposable item, but cheaply made straps can be easily broken. If you're handy, you might ...


1

There are 'universal' pipe hangers that you could shape as needed. These are just a strip of malleable metal with a series of holes in it. I'm sure the big box stores have something equivalent. http://www.mcmaster.com/#perforated-steel-straps/=nrz5k8 Adding some more options: http://www.mcmaster.com/#pipe-routing-clamps/=nrzgqn


1

There is a ground clamp, though it will not be flush with the pipe ~1/4" standoff. Lowes Product Link --Edit, adding addition items: Single Eared O Clip: Exhaust Clamp: Pipe Rail Tie:


1

I would drill your holes for the rack through your cabinet, then drill some counter-sink holes on the inside of your cabinet so your bolts are flush with the inside. You can find some flat headed bolts to use for this at any hardware store. Have the head of your bolt on the inside of the cabinet and secure it with a lock washer and nut. You should not ...


1

3M makes Command adhesive strips for posters. They supposedly come off clean when you pull the tab. From my experience, this type of adhesive works really well. I used them a for a towel hook in college since we weren't allowed to have even thumbtacks in the wall. At the end of the semester, you couldn't tell anything had been there at all. No sticky residue ...


1

Most washers will flex somewhat, so unless it's a really small pipe, or you're installing in really cold temperatures, you shouldn't worry ... but I'd be more concerned with being able to hold the nut still while you're trying to bolt to it in a smaller diameter pipe. (I don't know if the 1.5" is ID or OD, but if it's outer diameter, and it's got any ...



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