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1

Typically the reason for the low wattage rating is because of small gauge wire used in the fixture that would not be rated for much higher wattage/current draw required by 40 or 60 watt incandescent bulbs. Incandescent or halogen bulbs burn much hotter and in an enclosed space can fail prematurely. As far as using LED bulbs, they should work fine. The draw ...


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The black wires from switch to switch are power jumpers. The power is fed to the upper switch by the black wire on the top left. The jumpers then carry the power to the other two switches. The switches have an internal connection between the two terminals on the top edge of each switch. The wires in the lower left terminal of each switch is the switched ...


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Almost all whole house fans will blow air -- I'd pay careful attention to how loud it is as ideally you let it run all night (or for many hours). An added bonus is multiple speed settings to adjust to the evening, as well as a built in timer. I'm using an Airscape 2.5e and love it -- it's super quiet, internet connected (yes, and it's more useful than you ...


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No, no, no! It's polarized for a reason. Just replace the receptacle with a polarized receptacle. Make sure the taller slot is on the neutral side. They look like this, note the absence of a ground pin. There may be a green screw on the outlet nonetheless, that grounds the outlet. It should be left disconnected unless ground is actually present in ...


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You need to describe the power/amperage of the motor that runs the fan. In any case, the answer is that you would need quite a big solar system to run the typical attic fan. A typical 20-inch high velocity fan uses about 2.5 amps. So, to run the fan for 4 hours would requre 10 amp hours. A large, roof-type solar panel produces about 5 DC amps and you will ...



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