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That brown plastic is likely bakelite which was invented in 1907. It is unlikely it was installed when the house was built: I don't think electrical boxes were much in use until a little later, like the 1920s. Use care around it: it is brittle. The lack of electrical tape (probably) means the work was done sometime after the mid-1950s. Since then it is ...


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The numbers are almost certainly a courtesy from the previous electrician -- odds are that the other end of each wire carries the same number, so if you have all the electrical boxes open you can confirm how things are connected without having to trace everything electrically. They may also correspond to that original electrician's notes on how this was ...


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Is there a switch in the room, and does the current ceiling fan have both a light and a fan? The easiest way I've found to do this is to get a multimeter($5) and use it to determine which wire is hot (in the US, this is usually the black one). The next challenge is to determine which wire (if any) is switched), and you do that by checking each wire with ...


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The green wire is likely to be the ground, but make sure that whatever happens, always make sure the wires are not live before handling them. The other two wires (black, white) do not really matter where they are hooked up to. So far for the wiring. You mentioned it has a remote control. Are you sure that part works? Does it need batteries of some sort? ...


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First off, what room is this in? If this is a bathroom what I am saying DOES NOT apply. OK, so you have a fan with two separate switches, and you want to convert this into a "dual" fan control? This is easy, just remove the two switches and wire the fan control according to the instructions. Then you can take the feed wire from the left over switch, and a ...


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As a general rule, if the device has two wires that are indistinguishable, it won't matter. Where there's some physical reason in the construction to differentiate between "hot" and "neutral" on the wiring, the distinction is made - and sometimes it's made on things where it really doesn't matter to keep questions like this from arising. But it's ...


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There are covers you can purchase, or easily make, to insulate your attic fan. The cover attaches to the bottom of the fan (inside your house) with magnets or velcro. The magnets are cosmetically more appealing, as you'll see the velcro when the insulation is not on. It's very convenient, because you don't have to climb up into your attic to remove it ...



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