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6

If the fan has a pull chain as well as the remote the pullchain MUST be on high speed. The remote control only slows the fan down. Bottom line is no, you cannot re-wire a ceiling fan like this to make it go faster.


3

Have you read the manufacturer's documentation? The switches in the remote likely are for setting the transmitters frequency, and have nothing to do with fan speed. Usually fans have a speed selector switch (pull chain) that allows you to select LOW, MED, HIGH, or OFF. If that switch is in the LOW setting, that's as fast as the fan will spin despite ...


1

I think ThreePhaseEel and A.I. Berveleri have figured this out. That circuit was originally wired for a light only, with a 12/2 cable going up there - hot (black), neutral (white) and ground. Somebody added the fan later on, and they cheated. They used ground for neutral. They used black for the fan and white for the light. First, mark your wires. ...


0

A proportional temperature controller will accomplish this task. They are used in industry to do exactly this. Here is an excerpt from Omega.com: Proportional Control Proportional controls are designed to eliminate the cycling associated with on-off control. A proportional controller decreases the average power supplied to the heater as the ...


1

Ceiling fans are not generally silent. There is some motor hum, which may be transmitted to and reinforced by the ceiling, and there is some "white noise" as the blades cut through and move the air. Yes, some are quieter than others, by design or by the luck of installation. Whether yours is typical or not is best answered by your visiting a few friends ...


4

You would need to add a new wire from a new switch for the ceiling fan. If the (required) fan-rated box that will be installed is large enough you can simply leave the splice for the center light in that box just capped off.


0

you probably have the dip switches set differently in the transmitter compared to the receiver. you just need to open the receiver housing, check the switches and make sure they are set the same in the transmitter (assuming same model, frequency, etc is correct)


-1

Close inspection of the pictures reveals that this is a plaster ring mounted to a 4-S or 5-S box. It is a strange plaster ring in that it does not have standard threaded fixture tabs. Open the plaster a bit more to reveal the screws in the corner that hold the ring to the square box below. Because the square box itself appears to be sufficiently anchored, ...


-1

This old electrical box is not rated for modern fans. It does not have the the 8-32 screw tabs on two sides. I suggest to remove this old metal box and replace it with a new shallow fan box. Clearly this old box is screwed to a floor or ceiling joist in an old home. The new ceiling box can also be screwed to the joist. Be sure to turn off the power before ...


-1

It looks to me like the current box would come out pretty easily. I'd probably get a new box of similar dimensions that's intended to carry a fan and mount it to the metal bar basically the same way that the current box does. Some are designed to accommodate surface mounting. Otherwise, it's just a matter of finding the right hardware configuration to ...


-1

Buy a ceiling hugger style fan (the ones without a stem or with the option to mount without the stem). Mount the fan's bracket directly to the ceiling with toggle bolts or other such fastener. This way the fan is not support by the box at all. Good luck with your project!


0

The easiest component to test is the switch, but the most likely to fail is the capacitor, which is that thing on the right with the purple wires. Your motor looks like a simple induction type. Do a web search on "why does my motor have a capacitor" and you'll know as much as I do. Here are some tests you can try. Spin the shaft by hand (You've already ...


0

I would guess that one is actually hot one neutral and not marked properly... The black to black connection is most likely going to a switch, and out of the switch for what ever reason they ran a white and did not label it... BUT it is always concerning when you do not see proper colors :) I would check the switch...


1

You're likely seeing what's called a "switch loop". So the white wire of the cable running between the switch and the light, is used as the switched hot. The wire should be reidentified as such, but it's often not. If you're connecting the new light exactly as the old light was, you're probably okay. Use a voltmeter or multimeter to confirm, or have a look ...


2

Old school: probably not, unless the guy who wired that ceiling was generous with the wire. Cool new tech: Yes. They make electronic switch controls which are designed to solve a different problem: "I want a light AND fan, but my bathroom is wired for a light only." This consists of a smart switch that goes in the site of the regular switch, and an ...


0

If you want to control the new fan and light separately you will have to do some re-wiring, and this may be difficult depending on where the existing light is. If you don't mind them coming on together then the wiring part is quite easy. Whether you have to go in the attic depends on the fan you bought. Most do not install from below without hassle. Some, ...



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