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12

Most new fans comes with a balance kit. It includes a heavy clip and a set of stick-on weights. If you don't have the balance kit you can buy one at a big-box home improvement store. First, run the fan at each speed to see where it wobbles worst. Put the clip on one of the blades near the middle and run the fan at that speed. Check if the wobble improves ...


4

I have one in my house, never really had a problem with it. They are a bit loud though, so put it someplace out of the way - putting it in the kitchen or living room or anyplace people like to congregate and talk would not be a good idea. The only other thing to look out for is what happens in the winter. The big problem with ours is that while the ...


4

I have spent hours, even days researching whole house fans, and have found them to be one of the most cost-effective energy-saving home improvements one could choose to make. After sorting through all of information out there, Here's what I'd look for: Quiet operation - This allows you to run the fan during the coolest hours of the day (the nighttime, ...


4

Ideally, you would blow warm air out of your apartment. Cool outside air will naturally take its place. If you can take advantage of prevailing winds by having open windows on opposite sides of the apartment, do so. Otherwise, use a box fan blowing out of the screen door (assuming it's not in a bedroom -- they can be pretty noisy) and smaller fans pulling ...


4

Light dimmers are designed to drive loads that are largely resistive in nature like light bulbs. They are generally not compatible with loads that are inductive. Most, if not all, AC motors are inductive type loads. That said, whether a dimmer switch will work safely with your fan or not depends entirely upon the type of motor on the fan. There are some ...


3

You can use the switch to operate both the fan and light, if you so choose. In fact, this is a common feature in single user public restrooms. As long as the switch and wiring are rated for the amount of current, which unless you get a huge fan, it should be. If you have the ability to install a new cable (or pull an extra wire, if the wires happen to be ...


3

Try (this may well be awkward, and will probably need a pair of locking pliers rather than a screwdriver - assuming it unscrewed far enough to get those on before it stopped) pulling down on the screw as you unscrew it. Whatever it's screwed into (a plate, or a nut) is now turning with it - you are trying to get the plate or nut to jam so that you can ...


3

I moved to Sunnyvale from Chicago. What I found to be the most effective: Two fans. One blowing on me, one in the window pulling in the cooler night air. (As for your smoking neighbor, politely asking them will most likely change their behavior (most smokers aren't a**holes) and if not, you'll find CA has very aggressive anti-smoking laws. In many ...


3

You want a hole plug something like this These are similar to electrical knockout plugs. If you can't find a source, you could use a brass cap on the outside and a short machine screw on the inside (with a washer if needed). In either case, you need to be certain the capping material is not interfering with existing mechanisms or wires. Since the pull ...


3

Three things come to mind. The easiest and probably first thing to try is clean it (as Eric suggests). Make sure all the bolts and screws are tight, this may require taking the fan down and reinstalling it. If the fan was not properly secured when it was installed (it was mounted to an existing electrical box), the fan could have loosened the screws/nails ...


3

Depends on how it is wired. The single switch will control the fan and light simultaneously. If you want the light off, then you pull the chain for the light. The nice part about having the light on a different switch is you can simply go into a room without having to turn on the fan every time and have a nice bright fixture in the room. The downside is that ...


2

The switches for the fan are either in the lower bell housing or on top of the motor assembly. Check the lower bell first. There should be 3 or 4 small screws holding this on, remove them and carefully remove the light assembly. Look inside the bell to find the RF receiver, the switches are on this (you may have to pull it out to access the switches). If ...


2

A whinny noise suggests to me that it's likely something in the movement of the motor or attached assembly. Careful application of WD40 might be of some use if you can get it in past the blades, and closer to the motor itself. If that worked, but only for a short time, I would probably look for a way to open it up a bit (careful to turn off power first, ...


2

Seems to me that it would depend on where the squeak is coming from. If it;s inside the mechanism, or somewhere where parts of the fan are rubbing tegether then some WD-40 would probably fix it right up, but if the whole mounting is wobbling and causing the mount to rub against the junction box then you might try tightening the mounting hardware or ...


2

Our previous house had a whole house fan. I wired it up on a timer switch, so I could have it on when we went to bed, but have it shut off in the middle of the night. This cooled the house when we went to bed, but didn't pull the really cold air in early in the morning. Most of the newer whole house fans are much quieter and energy efficient. Many of ...


2

Your fan switch is shot. You can get replacement switches at big box stores. It is probably not a light switch or else the fan would simply turn on/off rather than what you see - slow/fast with no off. Five bucks and a half hour and you will be fine.


2

It sounds like someone replaced the pull-chain switch for the fan with one made for a light.


2

No way from here to know which wire fed the light or fan, but you have a continuous hot feed into the box that fed the receptacle, light and fan. The third wire, maybe it fed the fan or maybe something something else farther down the line, if the latter that needs to be tied in 100 percent to the hot feed. All whites still tied together, blacks to the dimmer ...


2

The fact that you have this problem even though you keep the office door open indicates that your problem is an insufficient supply of conditioned air to the room, rather than the lack of a return path for the air. This can be caused by the layout and sizing of your ductwork. Before taking on this project, you might try closing off the vent(s) in another ...


2

Sticky old oil in the bearings. After buzzing (and probably turning very slowly) for a while, the motor heats up enough for the oil to liquify, and then it runs normally. Try fresh oil if the bearings have a place to apply oil, or consider a new fan. This is a common problem with old fans.


2

The object in the bottom is a grate for a fan, probably a bathroom fan. All the other objects look like trims for light fixtures, perhaps recessed/pot lights. As far as if you "need" them, I can't answer that. The might be garbage, they might be spares, or you might have missing trims throughout your house.


2

Speaking from experience with the X10 equivalent, no. Even with the switch at 100%, the switch will overheat. You need a switch with a relay. Do it right or not at all; it's not worth burning your house down over.


1

You don't have a neutral at the switch. White is a traveler, and should be marked in some way to indicate that it is not a neutral (but is likely not marked). Red is the other traveler, and black is common (either attached to power or the light, depending on which switch it is). Multiway Switching can be confusing, and is the subject of many questions on ...


1

You haven't provided a whole lot of information, such as if the fan worked with the old thermostat. Regardless, I can help diagnose the problem. The wires involved are: R or Rh (possibly red) - 24V AC power G (Possibly green) - Fan W (Possibly white) - Heating call Don't make any assumptions on wiring. You need to open the furnace, find where on the ...


1

So, you have the logical and correct number of wires for your project - one power feed, one light, one fan. The power feed (which you can identify in various ways - I'm fond of a voltmeter but in your case, if you don't have one, if you didn't keep track of which wires went where, you can connect two black wires together with a wirenut, turn the breaker on, ...


1

The casing is more than likely nailed or screwed to the ceiling joist on the side that does not move. It may be possible to open a small slot along the face of the joist. Then run a reciprocating saw (Sawzall) along the face of the joist, eventually cutting the attachment fasteners and freeing the casing. The risk here is you could damage other things ...


1

This is what the wiring should look like... Notice the incoming ungrounded (hot) conductor is spliced, to supply power to each switch. The ungrounded (hot) conductors from the fixtures, are connected to the other side of the switches. The grounded (neutral) conductor is spliced with the grounded (neutral) conductors leading to the fixtures, and all the ...


1

Unfortunately, I think the fan idea is unlikely to work very well. When you exhaust the hot air in the apartment, that creates a negative pressure, which pulls air in from elsewhere. Where is that air going to come from? Outside. Where the air temperature is hot. See the problem? I lived in a second-floor apartment in the south bay for several years. Even ...


1

On some fans, the metal arms that hold the blades have some bend in them. I've balanced fan blades by just bending them slightly up or down and doing a lot of trial and error. Just be careful not to break them.


1

Cleaning and tightening will probably do the trick, if not some blades have a bit of adjustment in them. Failing that... One time I left the fan on in my parent's cabin for six months after I had a party there. When we got back it was still going but vibrating like it had a missing blade. My dad, bless his heart, just rolled his eyes and told me to deal ...



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