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35

PLEASE seek professional assistance immediately. There are two main issues with exhaust that can make you feel ill like this: Carbon Dioxide and Carbon Monoxide. Both are harmful, if not fatal, if the percentage present in the air you breath is too high. You DESPERATELY need to install a carbon monoxide detector, and contact your local housing authority. ...


9

Although not an answer different from the others but I'd like to point out, and considering its importance in this case, it probably can be tolerated in an answer of its own rather than buried somewhere among comments: on your way home today, not tomorrow or next week but today, pass a reliable hardware store in your neighborhood and buy a CO detector and ...


6

Seek medical attention immediately, and have the doctors provide a report on your health and diagnosis. Find out from them how dangerous it is to continue to expose yourself and your family to those fumes. After that, you have a few options, you might try one or more of them in parallel depending on the report itself: Provide copies of them to your ...


5

Some motors have a start up noise, and is normal for that type of motor. My table saw does this. Starts out a loud 60 Hz hum which quickly increases in frequency as the motor spins up, then gets inaudible or washed out by rushing air when full speed is reached. Motors that do this are not really appropriate for residential blowers. It also possible it's not ...


5

(I'm an American living in Austria.) My first thought was something related to the heating system too (although we're not heating yet in Vienna). I would still call the Rauchfangkehrer (chimney sweeps). There should be a flyer in the entry area of your building for the one responsible for your area. In Vienna, the flyer is usually yellow with a stylized ...


4

I have spent hours, even days researching whole house fans, and have found them to be one of the most cost-effective energy-saving home improvements one could choose to make. After sorting through all of information out there, Here's what I'd look for: Quiet operation - This allows you to run the fan during the coolest hours of the day (the nighttime, ...


4

Ideally, you would blow warm air out of your apartment. Cool outside air will naturally take its place. If you can take advantage of prevailing winds by having open windows on opposite sides of the apartment, do so. Otherwise, use a box fan blowing out of the screen door (assuming it's not in a bedroom -- they can be pretty noisy) and smaller fans pulling ...


4

I have one in my house, never really had a problem with it. They are a bit loud though, so put it someplace out of the way - putting it in the kitchen or living room or anyplace people like to congregate and talk would not be a good idea. The only other thing to look out for is what happens in the winter. The big problem with ours is that while the ...


4

Light dimmers are designed to drive loads that are largely resistive in nature like light bulbs. They are generally not compatible with loads that are inductive. Most, if not all, AC motors are inductive type loads. That said, whether a dimmer switch will work safely with your fan or not depends entirely upon the type of motor on the fan. There are some ...


4

From the perspective of a motor, a GFCI looks exactly the same as any other circuit breaker. The only difference is that a GFCI has extra circuitry which senses an imbalance between the black and white wires (plus control circuitry to trip the breaker)—nothing more. Many modern ceiling fans seem to be cheaply made. I suspect the failure is a quality ...


3

WD-40 is a penetrating oil and corrosion preventative. As a lubricant, it is quite short term as it tends to evaporate. And the lubrication type for an electric motor depends on the type of bearing. Ball bearings require grease. Flush the bearing with solvent to clean out the old gunk and pack with a light bearing grease. Oilite style sleeve bearings ...


3

You can use the switch to operate both the fan and light, if you so choose. In fact, this is a common feature in single user public restrooms. As long as the switch and wiring are rated for the amount of current, which unless you get a huge fan, it should be. If you have the ability to install a new cable (or pull an extra wire, if the wires happen to be ...


3

Sticky old oil in the bearings. After buzzing (and probably turning very slowly) for a while, the motor heats up enough for the oil to liquify, and then it runs normally. Try fresh oil if the bearings have a place to apply oil, or consider a new fan. This is a common problem with old fans.


3

You want a hole plug something like this These are similar to electrical knockout plugs. If you can't find a source, you could use a brass cap on the outside and a short machine screw on the inside (with a washer if needed). In either case, you need to be certain the capping material is not interfering with existing mechanisms or wires. Since the pull ...


3

I moved to Sunnyvale from Chicago. What I found to be the most effective: Two fans. One blowing on me, one in the window pulling in the cooler night air. (As for your smoking neighbor, politely asking them will most likely change their behavior (most smokers aren't a**holes) and if not, you'll find CA has very aggressive anti-smoking laws. In many ...


3

From my point of view this metal part is a base plate which makes it possible to mount the fan onto the plastic parts. As RedGrittyBrick noted, it is (or better was) zinc-plated. It seems to me, that most of the zinc layer is oxidized and cannot provide galvanic protection anymore. So why did it loose the zinc layer so quickly? If it was behind a cover ...


3

The fan controller is monitoring the lamp circuit to know when the lamp turns off. It seems as though it relies on a low-resistance path to neutral through the lamp filament to run the timer. The LED lamps have fancier electronics in them so there may not be a direct path to neutral if the electronics is not running.


3

(1) The fan as shown in the photo is upside down. Mounted in this position, the weight of the fan will pull the plate away from the beam. Turn it over so the weight will push the plate against the beam. (2) The beam will hold the fan but the weight will apply a twisting force to the beam. To overcome this, you should mount a board vertically from the beam ...


2

The fact that you have this problem even though you keep the office door open indicates that your problem is an insufficient supply of conditioned air to the room, rather than the lack of a return path for the air. This can be caused by the layout and sizing of your ductwork. Before taking on this project, you might try closing off the vent(s) in another ...


2

Our previous house had a whole house fan. I wired it up on a timer switch, so I could have it on when we went to bed, but have it shut off in the middle of the night. This cooled the house when we went to bed, but didn't pull the really cold air in early in the morning. Most of the newer whole house fans are much quieter and energy efficient. Many of ...


2

No way from here to know which wire fed the light or fan, but you have a continuous hot feed into the box that fed the receptacle, light and fan. The third wire, maybe it fed the fan or maybe something something else farther down the line, if the latter that needs to be tied in 100 percent to the hot feed. All whites still tied together, blacks to the dimmer ...


2

The object in the bottom is a grate for a fan, probably a bathroom fan. All the other objects look like trims for light fixtures, perhaps recessed/pot lights. As far as if you "need" them, I can't answer that. The might be garbage, they might be spares, or you might have missing trims throughout your house.


2

You haven't provided a whole lot of information, such as if the fan worked with the old thermostat. Regardless, I can help diagnose the problem. The wires involved are: R or Rh (possibly red) - 24V AC power G (Possibly green) - Fan W (Possibly white) - Heating call Don't make any assumptions on wiring. You need to open the furnace, find where on the ...


2

What is it that you want? Flow or pressure. CFM is a measure of flow rate in cubic feet per minute. Pressure on the other hand is created by forcing more and more air into a confined volume which implies that the flow rate is decreased! If it is simply more flow rate that you want through a certain sized volumetric space then use a larger fan on the ducting ...


2

Don't do it. Plugging the fan into 220V will draw twice the current and result in 4 times the power delivered to the motor, so it will spin like crazy. There is risk of overheating, fire, fan blades dislodging and bearings overheating. In some cases the motor can be rewired for a different voltage but it takes a fair bit of experience and knowledge to do ...


2

I did this for a house I own, and tied the fan directly to the light. You don't have to run another wire from the switch - just wire the light and fan in parallel. Both were in the attic, so it was easy to run a wire from the light to the fan. If running a wire from the light box is difficult, you can add an extra box between the existing switch and the ...


2

Without running an additional switched hot lead, it can be done using radio frequency transmitting switches which control a RF receiver/relay which you would have to wire into the ceiling box. Leviton makes devices like that. They are neither simple nor cheap. In my opinion it would be easier, quicker, and cheaper to fish a new wire or even open the wall. ...


2

The concept of a whole house fan is two fold. One is to bring in the cool evening air, the second is to flush out the hot air that is trapped in the attic. Your attic should already be vented enough to allow the incoming air a place to push the hot air out. If you where to make an opening for the fan to vent it, the cool air will just travel straight to ...


2

Speaking from experience with the X10 equivalent, no. Even with the switch at 100%, the switch will overheat. You need a switch with a relay. Do it right or not at all; it's not worth burning your house down over.


2

I would be less worried with the strict interpretation of what the code requires here than the reason that the code exists. An exhaust fan's purpose in a bathroom is to remove moisture from the room. Moisture and electricity generally do not mix safely, so I would put it on a GFCI protected branch regardless of whether it is required by code in your ...



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