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The answer is pretty much, yes. I think someone with experience needs to see what you are dealing with (the "level" of the moisture). The damp course should be preventing moisture issues... my question would be why isn't it, or why do you have so much moisture, or is this actually a moisture issue? There might be some other issue, like rain leaking into the ...


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Yes this paint is out there go to a masonry supply they will hook you right up it will be oil base so get the proper cleaning agent for your brushes and rollers .Thank You very much hope i was of some help .Master Mason Harlan.


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You removed one side of the jamb, and replaced it with new construction. But, there are 2 problems. the jamb is bowing; the jamb is not deep enough. The old jambs were 5 1/4" and fit perfectly since you have plaster instead of drywall. The new jams are 4 1/2" since they are assuming drywall. Those 2 problems are separate and should be treated as such ...


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Just did this. A few tips: Making the connections in the interior box may require more room, potentially upgrading to a bigger box. Use a hammer drill if you're going through brick/mortar. A PVC surface mount box for the exterior works great if you don't want to cut out a big chunk of brick or whatever your exterior is. It's good to know ahead of time ...


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It appears to me you have a brick exterior and a 2x4 wall that gives you a thicker wall. At the very least, you need a jamb for 2x6 walls. That may be wide enough to fit. Then follow the instructions for proper installation. Good,luck!


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Building official, zoning official, sanitarian or department of public health and if natural water ways or wetlands are involved, the wetlands commission, EPA and department of environmental protection. Usually a good general contractor will know the proper route to success.


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Jamb is installed poorly. This installation illustration may be helpful to you... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ICYwPa5_bFY


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no - the jamb should be level and square, with the jamb being parallel to the door on all four sides. gap should be about 1/8" on the top, hinge side and strike side, and about 1/4" on the bottom. make sure the sill is dead flat and level first. this is critical for long life. the trick is to mount the hinge side first, then the top, then the strike. ...


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It's the carpenter's responsibility to properly shim and anchor any door jamb. Unless it's a rigid steel commercial unit, it's not designed to be self-supporting. I usually shim behind each hinge on the hinge side, and at four locations, including the latch position, on the latch side. Use a combination of wedge and flat shims. For an exterior door I ...


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Yep, caulk it and paint it with paintable caulk and exterior paint (after a good "surface prepping"). Use a dark shade to help hide foot scuffs. Don't caulk inside the metal threshold, it probably needs to be able weep water. Just caulk it where it meets the wood, and all around where the wood abuts the building, even if it's not cracked, yet. The problem ...


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Code making bodies refer to them as the "Authority Having Jurisdiction" and they could be municipal, county or state depending on where you live. I had to go to one entity to get a well and septic permit, another one to get an address for my property and a third to get my building permits. It is an arduous process but is required to ensure safe building ...


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Take a tape measure and measure the width by putting the tape measure in the deepest channel and measure across to the other end and take off 1/4 inch. Do the same for the height.



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