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28

I've been making a rink in my yard for over 20 years. I don't use plastic or boards. To my mind that gives you the nasty task of getting up wet muddy stuff in the spring, putting it away somewhere etc. We use nothing but snow and water to build our rink, and we can have it whatever size and shape we want as a result. When the rink melts, it melts, and the ...


11

The usual recipe is... A border of wood, pvc pipe, or snow (not the best option). A large piece of plastic or tarp. Fill with water. let freeze. Skate. You'll want to make sure the area is fairly level, since if you have say a 3" slope across the area you'll need 8" of ice on one side and 5" on the other. To reduce damage to the lawn below, I ...


10

You have a fairly simple project. Assuming you intend to tap the interior outlet for power, here are the steps and materials: First, check that you have enough room in the interior outlet box to introduce one new piece of 14/2 or 12/2 NM, whichever is the same size as in the box now. I will assume you know how to make a parallel electrical junction in ...


9

Use a frost-proof sillcock. It will shut off the water 12 inches into the wall (which is probably on the inside of the wall for you), and the water on the outside of the shutoff will drain as long as there is no hose attached.


8

Sprinkle flour or talcum powder on the floor. Mice will leave tracks in the powder, eventually revealing entry points or nests. You don't have to blanket the entire floor, just near the walls/borders of the rooms, and "as needed" until you have the evidence you seek. Keep in mind that their typical range is 12-20 feet from their nest. Look for mouse ...


8

If the cost of raising the patio is too great you could get an angle grinder or perhaps a better choice would be renting a concrete wet saw and cut out a strip about 6 inches wide from the edge that meets the house wall. As @woodchips points out in his comment, make sure you wear gloves, safety goggle and a mask for this. It'll get hot, but it's very dusty ...


8

Looks like a wireless garage door keypad.


8

According to NEC table 300.5, for using a branch circuit of 120V and not more than 20A, with GFCI protection: If it's under 2" thick concrete or equivalent, then depth = 6" and you can use direct burial-rated cable, or run in a conduit Under a driveway (for 1-2 family homes), depth = 12" Under lawns (and anywhere except streets, buildings, parking lots), ...


8

I would use Duct Seal I'm surprised whoever installed the AC unit didn't use it, it's used all the time by Electricians and HVAC technicians. It does not harden; so unlike foam, it can be easily removed and replaced if you have to add/remove wiring/plumbing.


8

Use a NCVT (non-contact voltage tester) and see which of the two wires alarms when the switch is on. That will be your black/hot wire. If both of them alarm, stop, do not pass go, something else is wrong. For the ground, you don't have one. The safest thing to do is run a whole new wire back to the panel. Anything else is "less than safest".


8

If this is somewhat new construction, these might be anti-pest defense tubes. The exterior box resembles "Tubes in the Wall" pest defense system. Liquid pesticide is shot via CO2 at the exterior junction box and the liquid will travel throughout the house by means of the tubes. http://www.pestdefense.com/taexx is an example of this sort of system. ...


7

My guess is that it is a security keypad. The DNS on the cover could be from D.N. Security Services, Inc. a company from Northern California that was acquired by Universal Services of America in 2009: http://www.universalpro.com/news2.html.


7

From the pictures it looks like the cracks may only be in the stucco, and the underlying structural wall may be unaffected. It's hard to tell without actually inspecting the wall, but my guess is that these cracks are only skin deep. However, you will want to treat them to prevent them from spreading. Here is a good article about Cracks in stucco. Here ...


7

I don't see any reason why you couldn't use silicon caulking or why it would damage the surface. Just know that you will not be able to stain over it again. Some caulk is listed as paintable which might be a better bet as at least you can paint it down the road if you choose. If you are going to want to stain the door at a later date, a wood filler ...


7

Those are definitely termite tubes. Those are the exploratory tubes that termites make when they come out of the soil and are exposed to air and light. They build the tubes out of dirt and their feces to protect them when out of the ground. Definitely termite tunnels. These are common on the side of a house, or inside a crawl space going up foundation walls. ...


6

Consumer Reports recently did a review of various Gutter Guards. (You can buy the issue or join their web site to see the full results.) http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/magazine-archive/2010/september/home-garden/gutter-guard/overview/index.htm GutterStuff scored near the bottom. CR also said that water surface tension systems (like the Gutter Cap ...


6

I've found that mice can get in almost anywhere. I don't know how your house is setup but I have a tree which is relatively near my roof. I've had mice get up on the tree, climb up and into the roof vent. If I were you I'd just drop some money on a good exterminator (check the Better Business Bureau to find a reputable one) and have them get the house a good ...


6

I also would like to see some pics. Small cracks in the mortar of Block walls is not uncommon, however the placement of the cracks is a very important clue as to whether or not it is a structural concern. In general, anytime I see a crack starting from the bottom corner of a window and preceding down diagonally, I am concerned. The other crack that may be ...


6

Chances are good that there is only one cable coming into that light, and it is switched by the interior switch. If this is the case, as I suspect, you cannot draw power for your cam without the light being on. you will need to find a continuously powered set of wires or run a new set to your cam.


6

As Shirlock mentioned, the switched lamp is a problem ... however, there's a possible solution: replace the light with a fixture that'll switch at dusk. leave the switched turned on. You could bypass the switch, but then it's more inconvenient if you need to do work on the circuit. You can get covers that'll screw on over the faceplate so someone won't ...


6

You'll want to use a dry silicone lubricant like this. Or a graphite lubricant like this. The liquid part of these lubricants evaporates quickly, leaving behind a protective coating that will keep the lock functioning properly for quite some time. You don't want to use a lubricant like WD-40, because it will not evaporate completely and will collect ...


6

Lightweight spackling compound is not suitable for exterior use. Even if painted, water will effect it greatly. In addition, it is prone to cracking as it is brittle and probably will not withstand opening and closing of the door (vibrations). Wood filler or wood glue may work to fill the crack and would be better for exterior use. The glue is probably ...


6

You'd need to get an engineer to look at it first. The biggest problems I can think of are structural -- even if the house is pier and beam, you'd need to move piers out. If it's not, you would need to dig out a new foundation. Then you have to figure out if the overhang is actually appropriate as a roof over indoor space, that moving the wall won't ...


6

Though the crack is diagonal it looks relatively straight. In this case I'd take a piece of wood the approximate thickness of the crack at it's widest, cut it to length and then taper it so that it fits quite snugly - you should have to use a mallet to tap it home. Don't worry about the thickness too much - but obviously it should be fairly close. Once this ...


6

Wow, not exactly what I'd call decorative, but whatever. You can fill those gaps with Bondo auto body filler. Just be sure to clean out any loose or chipped paint etc. Auto body willer actually works better than wood filler in exterior applications.


6

NEC 2008 406.8 Receptacles in Damp or Wet Locations. (A) Damp Locations. ... A receptacle shall be considered to be in a location protected from the weather where located under roofed open porches, canopies, marquees, and the like, and will not be subjected to a beating rain or water runoff. All 15- and 20-ampere, 125- and 250-volt ...


6

Call your utility company and have the power shut off at the pole for the duration of your work in that area.


6

I'd drill from the inside out. Preparation inside Cut a hole in the drywall where you want the terminal. Cut the hole so that a "low voltage" bracket will fit. Drilling the hole If it's a 2×4 stud wall, your bit will only have to be ~5" long. Drill a hole in about the center of the drywall cut out. You can use a 3/8" installer bit, which is ~20" ...


5

Primer dries fast, so 50's will probally be OK, especially if it gets some direct sunshine. Give it some time however, before painting. I have used exterior paints as low as the 40's as long as night time temps are not going much lower, or paint/primer at least 4 hours before temps drop a bit. Some paints do give a temperature range. There are low ...



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