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If the duct is extremely clogged, you will need a professional. The tools for consumers do not have the strength to push through clogs. If the brush gets stuck which is very possible because of joints that are not flush or screws that are not permitted, you will need to hire someone to do an extra job.


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Another alternative is to build out one side of the wall that is away from the brace side. For example you could attach 2x2s to the edge of each stud to open up the wall cavity to another 1.5". This actually removes only a small amount of finished space in the room. If done all the way across one wall surface you would probably hardly realize that that one ...


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One thing you could look into would be flat oval ducting: You can get it as small as 3" in the smaller dimension, but it will likely be a lot harder to find and a lot more expensive. Also, it will compound the issue @iLikeDirt pointed out in keeping it clean, especially if you have transitions to round pipe anywhere. I would also limit yourself to one ...


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I definitely agree with iLikeDirt, but if you have no choice you can use oval duct such as this: http://www.deflecto.com/products/pc/Skinny-Duct-Aluminum-Dryer-Vent-br-4-Oval-Duct-Adjustable-27-48-4p445.htm If anything, as a safety precaution you should foil tape ALL joints and even elbows. I do this as standard even for exposed duct work. DO NOT use ...


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I wouldn't build it that way in the first place. Hiding a dryer duct within a wall and venting it through the roof (I'm guessing here, but that's what it looks like to me) is just begging for nobody to clean it until it eventually catches fire and burns the house down. I recently re-did my utility room and discovered an in-wall rigid steel duct just like ...


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If the timer is in the fan, it may not be possible to disable the timer without disabling the fan itself. Based on the labels (L,T,N), I would guess that L is the switched input for the light and T is a switched input that starts the timer for the fan. You can test this by disconnecting the T terminal (make sure you cap the bare wire before turning the ...


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Longneck is right on the rigid venting. This is a must going straight up like this. Also for the issues that you have had it is common sense to put a vent booster on the line. I think the rigid vent will certainly help but if you had that many problems then I would assume that gravity is getting the best of your situation. If you just replace with ...


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If possible, you want everything rigid: the connection from the dryer to the wall, the duct in the wall, and the duct in the attic. Sometimes rigid for the connection between the dryer and the wall is difficult to get right with a rigid duct so if you have to go with flexible duct then use the smallest piece practical. A secondary lint trap is probably not ...



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