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12

You can probably do it yourself cheaper than hiring it out. You could try something like this vent cleaning system. It seems to have fairly good reviews on Amazon, and for $25 it's worth a shot. It claims to have a 12' reach and the ability to navigate turns in the vent, so you may have to go at the last 3' from the other end. Note: You'll need a drill to ...


10

Before you do anything, you must figure out where it goes. It really has to vent outside. If it vents into the attic, you are going to have serious issues, including the potential of mold and rot as the hot, moist air is vented into an unconditioned space. It is (usually) against building codes to vent into the attic for this reason. If it is venting ...


9

What you show in the picture is known as a One-way Breather Vent (there are also two-way). Its intended purpose is to provide pressure equalization throughout the roof system and also provides ventilation for the insulation system. In some buildings that do not have a vapor barrier (even some that do), pressure changes inside the building can be forced ...


8

There are a few things I can find in the NEC that may apply here. NEC Article 300.8 states that no raceway or cable tray can have elements of any other system besides electrical in it; no plumbing, no fuel gas, no ductwork. This implies that using the vent line itself, or any of its mounting hardware, to support the cable is a no-no; if the wire and the duct ...


6

You're supposed to clean your dryer duct once a year or so to prevent a fire hazard. The standard thing to clean a dryer duct is a brush with a long flexible handle. They make ones specifically sized for dryer ducts. Here is a typical one: Disconnect your dryer and push the vent into the duct. Run it back and forth a few times. Keep a vacuum handy. ...


6

A vent at the soffit can be done, but so could venting directly into the attic, and both are poor choices. This is because soffits are used for air intake into your attic (and out a ridge or gable vent). If you vent too close to the soffit, the warm moist air that you're trying to get out of your home will get sucked back up the soffit and into the attic, ...


6

I would completely disagree with your builder. Since it is a new garage, I do see merit in the "build it in" approach. There are two important considerations: how many CFM do you need and what kind of noise level is tolerable? Are you using anything flammable? Water based paints should not be a problem but solvent based paints require special attention. ...


5

There should be a vent cover on the outside of the house, at the end of the exhaust with a damper or louvers. Something like this The damper or louvers will be shut when the hood fan is off, preventing air from coming in or going out. If you don't have a vent cover like this, you should install one. If you already have one, you'll want to inspect it to ...


5

I think Chris is right, warm moist air from outside is coming into the vent and condensing on the cooler inside surfaces. Fixing this could be as easy as fixing or replacing the outside vent damper so it closes properly. You could also go for a vent damper that installs within the vent itself. And finally, you can insulate the pipe so that the vent pipe ...


5

It is entirely possible to construct a 6 inch hole in brickwork. The problem with a round hole rather than a square hole is where the hole cuts across joints in the masonry leaving small triangular pieces of masonry over the hole. These tend to be fairly week so are best avoided. You would therefore have to position the circular hole carefully so that is ...


5

Well first, the outlet being at-grade is a no-no for those pest reasons. They don't have to get up the vertical pipe to cause problems; a mouse or bird can nest in there and cause problems. They did it anyway because it was easier to run it down through the crawl space then up to the ceiling (where, if this is your garage, they'd then have to build a sealed ...


5

I think you just need to find a better built vent hood. The first one I found searching on HD specifically calls out this problem in the description: Unlike other versions that tend to rattle in the wind, the back draft damper on the ProMax cap has been designed for noise and wind resistance and its stylish wide mouth appearance helps to optimize the ...


5

I am a Local HVAC Tech in the Toronto area. As stated, this exhaust is not installed according to local codes and the manufacturers installation instructions. There is no surprise that you are getting freezing condensation on the brick of the house. The reason for having the vent terminate straight out and away from the building is to avoid this. The facing ...


4

I know you already have this problem and are asking about clearing it up. However, to prevent this from happening in the future, consider installing one of these lint traps near the exit of your dryer: I have one and it seems to work very well. You'll need to pop open the top and clean out the lint every few weeks depending on how much drying you do.


4

I'll answer my own question a month after the installation. Inline are great, especially high-quality ones such as Fantech. Highly recommended.


4

Duct Tape is good for a lot of things, except duct work! It will eventually dry up and pull away from the heat in the vent. I would bend/dent one of the ends slightly so that it will fit easily inside of the other. Then I'd secure it with proper HVAC foil tape, followed by a clamp around it. Foil Tape Metal Gear Clamp


4

I'd recommend venting out the gable. Run a rigid vent from the gable wall to a point near your install, and use a 2' piece of flex duct to connect the fan to the rigid vent. The flex duct makes the bends easy (don't kink it) and allows the fan to be repaired from below in the future. For that length, I don't think you need to worry.


4

The "best" approach is to take the shortest straight path to get the exhaust air out of your house. Generally that's via a roof vent. Check out this answer for a little more info. Your plan A, two bends and out the gable end is fine as an alternative. 10 feet is not a very long way for a bathroom exhaust vent. If possible, use a rigid vent to avoid ...


4

It is possible that the previous dryer was a stacked unit with the dryer mounted above the washer.The general rule for dryer vents is not any longer than necessary.Two concerns I have are the flex hose if you can replace it with an elbow do that if not use metallic flex not the plastic type.The second concern is if you live in an area that sees snowfall ...


4

The exhaust pipe discharge is too close to the house. It should extend 8 to 12 inches from the wall if using tee on vent end. The exhaust might have been placed in its odd position because of a gas regulator vent. I see the pipe exits near the gas service. From a survey of high efficiency furnace installation manuals, and my own experience installing my ...


4

If possible, you want everything rigid: the connection from the dryer to the wall, the duct in the wall, and the duct in the attic. Sometimes rigid for the connection between the dryer and the wall is difficult to get right with a rigid duct so if you have to go with flexible duct then use the smallest piece practical. A secondary lint trap is probably not ...


3

In general, yes an exhaust vent (or any vent) can turn corners. But there are many other factors to consider. Different vent materials or dimensions resist air differently. Different ways of turning corners resist air differently. The best place to start looking for info on this is the vent installation manual. It will talk about different ways to ...


3

The first thing I would check, is to make sure there are no blockages in the vent. If there is debris restricting the flow of air, it could produce noise. Another cause of this could be that the wind is blowing just rught across the top of the pipe causing it to vibrate, similar to blowing across the top of a bottle to produce sound. To prevent this, you ...


3

This is one of those questions that is very difficult to answer properly with the info given. Although it sounds like you may be able to downsize the vent/flue because to the change over to a high efficiency furnace, there are lots of considerations depending on the exact equipment you have. The water heater is a different application as well. In your ...


3

The warmer air exhausted from the bath entering a cold environment will condense and create moisture. It will create high humidity which will lead to mold growth. this will become a health issue as well as rot the wood. You want to vent it to outdoors, never indoors.


3

It's not ideal but will probably work. Hot air rises so the fan would be more efficient if it were in the ceiling or high up on the wall, but even if it's lower down the wall it should be able to remove most of the moist air satisfactorily.


3

@Peter: I think you answered your own question in your comment to ChrisF. What you want is an "inline draft blocker." And you'll want two, one for each dryer. Here are a few on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Lambro-Industries-Blocker-1775L-Accessories/dp/B000H5PTJA/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=hi&qid=1304804320&sr=1-1 ...


3

If you only have to cut through one course of brick, the easiest way would be to go to your local rental center, rent a powerful/professional rotary/impact drill. Some may come with hole saws, but you can buy one at a HI store for around $30. This will make a clean hole for your vent.


3

On your length, per your description you should be OK. 504.6.1 Maximum length. The maximum length of a clothes dryer exhaust duct shall not exceed 45 feet (13 716 mm) from the dryer location to the outlet terminal. The maximum length of the duct shall be reduced 5 feet (1524 mm) for each 45 degree (0.79 rad) bend and 10 feet (3048 mm) for each 90 degree ...



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