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7

There more restricted the airflow is, the more noise there will be. All contributing factors to noise: Diameter of duct (larger is better) Overall length (shorter is better) Number of turns/bends (fewer is better) Radius of turns (larger is better) Size reducers used (no reducers is better) Type of duct (smooth, rigid is better than flexible) Type of ...


4

More than 20 feet of flex pipe is a problem - 20 feet of flex pipe, uninsulated, sloped so it drains back into the fan is a huge problem. Flex pipe has VERY high resistance to airflow compared with smooth duct. It should be avoided, or if its absolutely unavoidable it should only be used for very short sections where regular fittings will not work. I don't ...


2

You should extend the wiring from the light, not the switch. There should be two wires on your light fixture, one grounded (neutral), and one ungrounded (hot) conductor that's controlled by the switch. Extend those wires to the fan, along with a grounding conductor. That will allow the switch to control both the light, and the fan simultaneously.


2

I don't disagree that replacing the fan is likely the best long-term solution, but it is possible that the fan's intermittent failure to start is due to dust. Starting up from a still position is the hardest a fan needs to "work", and dust buildup could be adding too much extra resistance on the fan rotor, preventing it from starting. You would hear a ...


2

The picture of your range hood indicates that it was designed to vent back into the kitchen area if desired. That is what those small louvered vents on the front are for. Most such units can be either vented through ducting in the traditional method (preferred method, IMHO) or vented through the vents on the front of the unit. They are called convertible ...


2

The correct solution for this would be to close off the external vents for this pipe. If weather conditions allow entry of the elements then trying to plug things up internally does not solve the problem. I would remove the old external vent and provide the proper covering whether that be flashing, siding or roofing material. A very good question is: How ...


2

Exhaust ducts can make areas dramatically colder. In a cold climate, there should be a vent flap near the fan that closes to prevent air flowing into the room - but these commonly only do a so-so job. A better fix is installing a vent cap with flappers on the exterior of the duct. Because these have much more room to work with, and endure exterior ...


2

A three-way, or single pole double throw (SPDT), switch should be able to do what you want. Connect the ungrounded (hot) line feeding the switch, to the common terminal on the three-way switch. Connect the ungrounded (hot) line feeding the main light, to one of the switched terminals on the three-way switch. Connect the ungrounded (hot) line feeding the ...


1

To me it sounds like you removed the back draft damper that may have gotten stuck.


1

Obviously this fix won't apply in all cases, but it's something to check for. Searched around for some answers, and noticed some advice about the exhaust duct being too small. With the fan out, I felt for the duct to see how big it was, and a piece of rubber came out, around the same size as the duct. Possibly something cut out for the duct 45 years ago ...


1

There are three reasons why whole house fans generally vent into attics. First, whole house fans are designed to pull air from the highest point in the living space of a house, which is generally where the warmest air collects. This removed air is replaced by cool air entering windows in the first floor, flushing the warm air out of the house. The highest ...


1

As was said in the comments on your question, you get additional efficiency by clearing hot air in the attic in the process. Your house air is maybe 75-80* F, while your attic can be 100* or more. Ventilating the home and the attic results in greater overall cooling by reducing heat that would conduct back through any attic insulation. I assume here that ...


1

Do not buy a bathroom fan, as they are generally rated to run no more than an hour or so at a time. You want a fan that's rated for continuous operation. Do make sure your attic has sufficient ventilation area that you don't generate any back pressure. Similarly, figure out some way to get plenty of air into the closet, e.g. a screen panel in the door. ...


1

I'd have no concerns at all in doing this, assuming a well-ventilated attic. Be sure you have a functioning backflow preventer to keep cold air out in winter. Being more dense, it'll have a tendency to fall into the room.


1

While this would just be short term use. If you have natural gas, propane or oil appliances, this could & even would suck noxious fumes into the house which could eventually or quickly kill you. That's the bad news. Other than that, an exhaust fan does, of course, remove heated & cooled air. If you're single I don't see this being a big deal. But, ...


1

Dry air is more dense than humid air, so your thinking about humid air accumulating near the ceiling makes sense. Because it's a basement, however, I'm going to assume humidity is coming through the floor or walls. Tackling the source of the humidity by letting drier air circulate along the floor and walls will probably be most effective at drying the space. ...


1

Sure, you could exhaust a jet engine through a 4" pipe but the problem is the velocity of the air. As the size decreases the velocity increases for any given cubic feet per minute rate of exhaust. So, what you have to do is calculate the velocity of the air through a 4" pipe given the CFM of the fan. And then will that velocity cause an objectionable ...


1

Verify with a voltmeter that the fan is indeed getting 120V AC. If it does, and there's no physical obstruction to the fan blades, bring it back to where you bought it, the motor is faulty. If there's no 120V, you'll need to check your wiring, and the switch. Any kind of automatic fan switch (humidity sensor, timer, etc.) is especially suspect. Replace it ...


1

To go along with gregmac's very good answer I would offer the follow tips. Make sure your rigid duct is ultra secure, especially near the fan. If it wiggles when you grab it then it will make sounds with the fan going. I strap these things in really tight. I rockwool the first 3-4 feet really tight. I smash it in around the duct. This absorbs much of ...


1

The fan motor is starting to go out and needs to be replaced. I know most models you can replace just the fan motor, but the cost of the fan motor is about the same as to replace the whole unit. If you go ahead and do it yourself make sure to turn off the power to bathroom.


1

I used something like this (4 in. Round Wall Vent). It only flaps when the wind is really blowing. Here is another option that should have no clickey clackey at all: Cape style backdraft damper



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