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5

If you have access to the attic; and presumably the top of the bathroom fan, you may be able to follow the duct. If you don't have access to the top side of the fan, you could remove the cover and take a peek inside. You should be able to get a glimpse of the outlet, which should allow you to determine if there's ducting attached. In my house, the ...


4

Typically you'd run 14/2 to the vanity, and 14/3 to the fan/light combo. In the switch box, Connect all the grounded (neutral) conductors. Connect all the grounding conductors. Connect the ungrounded (hot) conductor from the vanity to the switch. Connect one of the ungrounded (hot) conductors from the light/fan to the switch. Connect the other ...


3

WD-40 is a penetrating oil and corrosion preventative. As a lubricant, it is quite short term as it tends to evaporate. And the lubrication type for an electric motor depends on the type of bearing. Ball bearings require grease. Flush the bearing with solvent to clean out the old gunk and pack with a light bearing grease. Oilite style sleeve bearings ...


2

If the timer is in the fan, it may not be possible to disable the timer without disabling the fan itself. Based on the labels (L,T,N), I would guess that L is the switched input for the light and T is a switched input that starts the timer for the fan. You can test this by disconnecting the T terminal (make sure you cap the bare wire before turning the ...


2

I am assuming that new fan is bigger or same size. You have joists that this is nailed/screwed into. Try not to damage adjacent drywall. I am going to guess from this picture your joists are on the top/bottom of picture. This is because your exhaust/and electric look to be coming from the left. I would cut straight along the top and bottom (using ...


2

Its either attached to joist or there is brackets attached to joists. Look for screw /nail on side of box into joist. If it is brackets you will need to use a reciprocating saw can cut it out. Make sure you don't hit the wire though.


2

You would use a coupling tape and hose clamps. You use thin flex aluminum duct like shown in picture but I like to stick with the semi rigid flex duct. Zip ties can be used on thin stuff but not semi rigid.


2

Pull the cover: inspect the fan to see if it is full of lint or debris, you may simply need to clean it. While you're there: Get the model number of the fan and verify that it has the correct CFM for the size bathroom it is installed in. If it is under rated, consider replacing the fan with one that is more powerful; some decent fans start as low as 50$ ...


2

Probably the best solution in your case it to directly vent out. Since you have two external walls one of the walls will allow you to vent out of it. You need to pick the one that runs perpendicular to your joists. There is not much downside in venting out. It is easier. By venting up you are actually causing an opening in your house for hot air to ...


2

You can do it using only 12/2 and 12/3 cables like this. Or you could use 12/2 and 12/4 cables like this. Because there will be so many wires in the box, you'll want to get at least a 34 cu. in. double gang box. Like this one. NOTES: I've excluded grounding conductors from the images to increase clarity. Do not forget to connect all grounding ...


1

No, this is not a code requirement for laundry rooms in dwelling units (at least in the 2012 IBC). In fact, most dryers are essentially acting as exhaust fans when they run because they take air from the room and exhaust it outside.


1

The switch must be in a listed and labeled enclosure, or the switch itself must have a built-in enclosure. The switch should also be rated for the voltage, and current, to which it will be subjected. You'll also want to make sure the switch is attached in such a way, that normal use will not rip it from the enclosure. Pull chains can be subjected to a lot ...


1

The primary concern with any opening is bulk water infiltration. Sound practice is a minimum of 8" between the sill of the opening and the roof surface to provide for proper flashing and counterflashing. 12" is better. So long as the duct layout and clearances are consistent with the manufacturer's recommendations, the installation should otherwise be fine. ...


1

Fan vibration is mostly a matter of fan quality (which unfortunately is not as simple as price, though it's sometimes related.) Bearings and how well the fan blades are balanced are the main influences. You can also switch to an inline duct fan located away from the bathroom - any vibration would be non-local to the bathroom, at least, and as a general (but ...


1

Pure speculation here, but the theory is solid: The vibration may have been caused by, or exacerbated by, an imbalance on the fan blades due to a buildup of dust and grime. I've noticed that the intake grilles of bathroom fans, if not cleaned, tend to build up dust. Periodic cleaning of the fan blades (not merely the grille), if they can be accessed, may be ...


1

Not counting the ground wires, you have four insulated conductors. One could be the supply hot, each of the others could be switched hot leads. The presumption would be that the neutral is in the ceiling box and not present in the wall box. Totally possible. If this is true, please mark the switched hot leads appropriately.


1

Check around the farm supply places - they carry big dampers. I used to have one about 36" square (the ex still has it). Try places like here and here.


1

Leave the door open to reduce humidity, better yet: knock out the hinge pins, pull the door and lay the door flat on some sawhorses and give it a good glossy paint job paying special attention to the top and bottom edges.


1

No, not without running new wire. The way you have it there is only one switch leg going up to the fan/light.



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