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7

There more restricted the airflow is, the more noise there will be. All contributing factors to noise: Diameter of duct (larger is better) Overall length (shorter is better) Number of turns/bends (fewer is better) Radius of turns (larger is better) Size reducers used (no reducers is better) Type of duct (smooth, rigid is better than flexible) Type of ...


4

Typically you'd run 14/2 to the vanity, and 14/3 to the fan/light combo. In the switch box, Connect all the grounded (neutral) conductors. Connect all the grounding conductors. Connect the ungrounded (hot) conductor from the vanity to the switch. Connect one of the ungrounded (hot) conductors from the light/fan to the switch. Connect the other ...


2

In rooms with no shower or bath, 25' should be no problem. Just run the smooth wall pipe and go with 4" diameter. For the rooms with showers and baths it should not be a problem if you can get it go vertical into the attic, then slope down towards the exit. Even at 25' it should not be a problem. You could even possibly use ABS pipe for the sloped run ...


2

A simple on/off switch is best for a fan. This is a 'single-pole' switch. For a rocker style, something like this would work http://www.homedepot.com/p/Leviton-Decora-15-Amp-Single-Pole-AC-Quiet-Switch-White-R72-05601-2WS/100058788 The switch will most likely be rated for 15 amps. This is fine, the switch must be the same as or more than the fan.


2

The picture of your range hood indicates that it was designed to vent back into the kitchen area if desired. That is what those small louvered vents on the front are for. Most such units can be either vented through ducting in the traditional method (preferred method, IMHO) or vented through the vents on the front of the unit. They are called convertible ...


2

I don't disagree that replacing the fan is likely the best long-term solution, but it is possible that the fan's intermittent failure to start is due to dust. Starting up from a still position is the hardest a fan needs to "work", and dust buildup could be adding too much extra resistance on the fan rotor, preventing it from starting. You would hear a ...


2

The correct solution for this would be to close off the external vents for this pipe. If weather conditions allow entry of the elements then trying to plug things up internally does not solve the problem. I would remove the old external vent and provide the proper covering whether that be flashing, siding or roofing material. A very good question is: How ...


2

Exhaust ducts can make areas dramatically colder. In a cold climate, there should be a vent flap near the fan that closes to prevent air flowing into the room - but these commonly only do a so-so job. A better fix is installing a vent cap with flappers on the exterior of the duct. Because these have much more room to work with, and endure exterior ...


1

Sure, you could exhaust a jet engine through a 4" pipe but the problem is the velocity of the air. As the size decreases the velocity increases for any given cubic feet per minute rate of exhaust. So, what you have to do is calculate the velocity of the air through a 4" pipe given the CFM of the fan. And then will that velocity cause an objectionable ...


1

You should extend the wiring from the light, not the switch. There should be two wires on your light fixture, one grounded (neutral), and one ungrounded (hot) conductor that's controlled by the switch. Extend those wires to the fan, along with a grounding conductor. That will allow the switch to control both the light, and the fan simultaneously.


1

The fan motor is starting to go out and needs to be replaced. I know most models you can replace just the fan motor, but the cost of the fan motor is about the same as to replace the whole unit. If you go ahead and do it yourself make sure to turn off the power to bathroom.


1

I used something like this (4 in. Round Wall Vent). It only flaps when the wind is really blowing. Here is another option that should have no clickey clackey at all: Cape style backdraft damper


1

To go along with gregmac's very good answer I would offer the follow tips. Make sure your rigid duct is ultra secure, especially near the fan. If it wiggles when you grab it then it will make sounds with the fan going. I strap these things in really tight. I rockwool the first 3-4 feet really tight. I smash it in around the duct. This absorbs much of ...


1

To do what you ask: Disconnect the supply for the fan switch - wire-nut and tape it (it will be going no-where.) If it's a jumper from the light switch supply, just remove the jumper. If the light switch is supplied by a jumper from the fan, remove the jumper and move the supply to the light switch. Put a pigtail on the light switch switched hot, and ...


1

The answer to your only stated question is YES. To independently switch 2 different things you need to have 2 switched hot wires, you would have to run an additional wire from the wall switch location to the ceiling location. The statement that "the light only has 14/2 running to the switch" tells us that one of those wires is a hot lead to the switch, the ...


1

This is symptomatic of a poor connection somewhere, or a bad-on-arrival fan. I'd rewire the switches using the screw terminals as a first step (don't forget to hook the grounds up when you do), and if that does not cure it, I'd try Craig's troubleshooting suggestion of switching the fan and the light. If the fan still acts up, then return the fan to ...


1

Just a couple of points to keep in mind... 1) Any exhaust fan is moving air out of the house...that means there is outside air coming INTO the house somewhere to make up for the lost air volume. Speaking only about temperature, this could be a good thing or bad depending on where most of that air is coming in. For instance, if it is getting sucked in from ...


1

Dryer vents need regular maintenance. Period. No one ever does it, of course, which is why every time you buy a new house, you pretty much need to replace the old vent because no one ever cleaned it out. Ideally, you'd clean the lint out every 6 months or so. A booster fan can help, but doesn't necessarily eliminate any of the maintenance. Plus, you now ...


1

They're often called dryer booster fans. They aren't particularly difficult to install, and they are reasonably effective. However, they also have some significant downsides - the fan itself obstructs the the vent pipe, which makes it much more difficult to effectively clean the vent, and it will further reduce airflow and increase lint accumulation should ...



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