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6

If you accidentally broke the tab between the black (common) screws on the swtich, simply use two short pigtails off the supply line like this... If you have two separate cables (one to the fan, and one to the light), then you'd wire it up like this... And again if you've clipped the tab between the terminals, it will look like this... Here is ...


3

Leaking air, or leaking water? If leaking air, either replace it if it's degraded, or try duct joint sealant (which stands a somewhat better chance of lasting than duct tape.) "Leaking" water - a bathroom exhaust vent needs to be heavily insulated all along its length, and should preferably run straight up, then turn and slope gently to the outside, so ...


2

Please excuse my artwork. I need more practice. The yellowish wires are the white neutral wires (I should have made the background gray.) and are all tied together and also connect to the neutral of the outlet. The bare copper grounds are all tied together and connected to the ground screw of both items. A wire nut capped pigtail is fine for that, though ...


2

Probably the best solution in your case it to directly vent out. Since you have two external walls one of the walls will allow you to vent out of it. You need to pick the one that runs perpendicular to your joists. There is not much downside in venting out. It is easier. By venting up you are actually causing an opening in your house for hot air to ...


2

If the timer is in the fan, it may not be possible to disable the timer without disabling the fan itself. Based on the labels (L,T,N), I would guess that L is the switched input for the light and T is a switched input that starts the timer for the fan. You can test this by disconnecting the T terminal (make sure you cap the bare wire before turning the ...


2

I am assuming that new fan is bigger or same size. You have joists that this is nailed/screwed into. Try not to damage adjacent drywall. I am going to guess from this picture your joists are on the top/bottom of picture. This is because your exhaust/and electric look to be coming from the left. I would cut straight along the top and bottom (using ...


2

Its either attached to joist or there is brackets attached to joists. Look for screw /nail on side of box into joist. If it is brackets you will need to use a reciprocating saw can cut it out. Make sure you don't hit the wire though.


2

You would use a coupling tape and hose clamps. You use thin flex aluminum duct like shown in picture but I like to stick with the semi rigid flex duct. Zip ties can be used on thin stuff but not semi rigid.


2

Cutting a hole through brick is no big deal. You could use one of these as a disposable hole saw for $20: Or one of these as the "right" tool, which will be reusable for $75: Most hole saws require a 1/2 inch drill plus a ~$10 arbor, both of which will be very useful for other projects in the future, like installing door knob sets in new doors, ...


1

No, not without running new wire. The way you have it there is only one switch leg going up to the fan/light.


1

I don't see how a desiccant could possibly remove moisture rapidly enough to be helpful, and it also just traps the moisture instead of getting rid of it. Once the desiccant is saturated it won't absorb any more moisture (or it will just release it back into the attic — the whole problem you're trying to avoid). A dehumidifier with a drain in the attic near ...


1

There is no quicker way to remove odors or moisture than a properly ducted exhaust fan. Surprisingly enough, it is not that difficult to break a hole through the brick and duct it out the side wall of the house, especially if you have a rotary hammer. Ducting through the attic is no issue either as long as if you are in a area that has cold winter climates, ...


1

If you have access to the attic, another alternative is to vent through the eaves. You just have to make sure you get a damper designed for facing down or install the damper in a horizontal stretch of duct.


1

I would 'push' and 'pull' with "muffin fans" I would locate the 'push' side in the toe-kick area in the cabinet to the left and put the 'pull fan inside the top left wall (in the cabinet to the right of the icemaker) this should pull out the hot air at the top and supplement with relatively cooler air near the floor. Fan shrouding, plug in timer for ...


1

Try installing a vent in the door, it will allow the room to breath. Make sure the exhaust from the dryer is sealed all the way around where it exists the wall, then go outside and do the same thing. Check the roof edge and make sure you aren't having water drain behind the gutter into the wall. Then climb into the attic when it rains with a big light and ...



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