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20

Bathroom vent fans must be vented to the out of doors. Venting this fan into the attic is simply asking for problems. The excessive moisture will cause condensation on the roof members, insulation and eventually cause mold. It is never OK to vent directly into an attic even if the attic itself is vented. So, the simple correct answer is NO. Your friends ...


16

You have two big issues here. First is that you have a serious risk of venting sewer gasses into your home. This is why drain vents open above the roof line or use one-way air admittance valves. This is likely to be unpleasant and possibly unhealthy. Second is that a drain vent is typically too small and too moist to properly vent a bathroom fan. Your fan ...


11

See this question. The long and short of it is that a vent fan, whether for a bathroom, a range hood or a clothes dryer, is normally removing very humid air from the room. If that air is not exhausted beyond the waterproof "skin" of your house (up through the roof beyond the shingles, or out the side of the house beyond the siding or brick), then you are not ...


9

Soffit Pros Vent easier to install In heavy snow areas, not likely to be blocked Cons Soffits are designed for intake, so it's possible the air will be sucked back into the attic Moist air can collect under the soffit Roof Pros Heat and moisture want to rise Keeps moisture away from walls, windows, siding Cons Can be blocked with heavy snow ...


8

What you show in the picture is known as a One-way Breather Vent (there are also two-way). Its intended purpose is to provide pressure equalization throughout the roof system and also provides ventilation for the insulation system. In some buildings that do not have a vapor barrier (even some that do), pressure changes inside the building can be forced ...


8

The National Electrical Code (NEC) does not require bathroom exhaust fans to be GFCI protected, however, there is this bit in Article 110. 110.3 Examination, Identification, Installation, and Use of Equipment. (B) Installation and Use. Listed or labeled equipment shall be installed and used in accordance with any instructions included in the listing ...


7

The natural flow of air in an attic is going to be pulling air in through the soffit vents and out through the roof vents/ridge vent. The problem I see with exausting the air through a soffit vent is that the natural flow is going to tend to pull that moist air right back in through the soffit vents and into the attic again. Given that the air flow ...


7

You may have condensation running down the vent pipes into the fans; given how a vent pipe attaches to the back of a fan, the condensation will tend to run to the side(s) of the fan fixtures. Are the vent pipes uninsulated and in a cold space? Could condensation have frozen inside of the pipe, and then melted at the same time as the snow? Would the snow ...


6

That must be one powerful fan to require a dedicated 20 amp line. WOW. The silver wire you see is probably a tinned copper wire. (solder on the end of a stranded copper wire). To connect a 12 and 14 AWG set of wires together, you should use a yellow wirenut. If in fact the tinned conductor is smaller than a 14 AWG, you could use an orange wirenut. If you ...


5

Sometimes with stranded wire, they will tin the ends with solder. I would guess this is the case here since you're right that aluminum is not usually used. I think the only reason they do this is to keep the ends from fraying and keep it neat. You can check for sure by stripping new ends. I have never seen stranded aluminum, or anything less than 12awg ...


5

As far as I know, it doesn't really matter as long as it's vented outside. Venting into the attic is Very Bad -- in the winter, the humid air will condense and (if cold enough) freeze, and you'll effectively have water in the attic. For any vents, the straighter the run is, the more efficient and quieter it is. Avoid corrugated pipes, and avoid bends and ...


5

I think Chris is right, warm moist air from outside is coming into the vent and condensing on the cooler inside surfaces. Fixing this could be as easy as fixing or replacing the outside vent damper so it closes properly. You could also go for a vent damper that installs within the vent itself. And finally, you can insulate the pipe so that the vent pipe ...


5

In my experience, most decent exhaust fans are dual rated, ceiling or wall. If your fan is described as a ceiling mount only, it is probably one of many inexpensive units that use plastic bushings instead of sealed bearings. If you can easily jiggle the fan blade or squirrel cage axle in it's end bushing mounts, then I probably wouldn't waste my time using ...


5

You should use a separate outlet for the pipe as the existing vents won't be able to cope with the volume of air and you'll probably end up with steam in the loft. Did you buy a kit or separate components? If you've got a kit then there should be an outlet grille in that, if not you should be able to get one at the same place you bought the fan and flex ...


5

If you accidentally broke the tab between the black (common) screws on the swtich, simply use two short pigtails off the supply line like this... If you have two separate cables (one to the fan, and one to the light), then you'd wire it up like this... And again if you've clipped the tab between the terminals, it will look like this... Here is ...


4

Ok, if the snow fairy didn't land on every fan individually, then I think we have a common problem between fans. If your roof vent has a common back flow air baffle, I'd check it to see if it is stuck open, allowing snow to blow into the vent pipes. Second and not really likely is a leak around the flashing. A leak around the flashing would appear on the ...


4

This is a very common problem. The person above who mentioned a condensation trap is right on the money. No matter how powerful a fan, how well insulated the duct, you are blowing warm, MOIST, air into cold air which makes that moisture in the air condense into water droplets. A condensation trap, which can be as simple as a bit of a loop in the flexible ...


4

If you put a couple of sheet metal screws in the joints, and tape them with foil tape, you should be able to do a 5 foot vertical rise with support at the roof boot or where you contact the rafters. You could use straps, but usually the boot if sized properly will be fine if the bottom of the run is supported well.


4

The three pairs of wires correspond to the three functions. You should be able to find labels or a note in the manual explaining which is which, but for now I'll assume: black/white: main light red/white: fan blue/white: night light The green wire is a ground wire. How you wire this up depends on what you have available. A 3-way switch will not help you ...


4

Bad, bad, bad. Mold will be in evidence shortly in the loft (attic), as we go into warmer weather. The vent must run to the exterior, either through a gable wall or through the roof. Its easier to properly down-slope to the gable wall (to eliminate any condensation in the vent pipe. To reduce pipe condensation (either inside or outside of pipe), a jacket ...


3

Sealing the vapor barrier You'll want to seal the vapor barrier to the fan housing using an acoustic sealant like OSI® SC-170™, or similar product (you might have to do this from above). Just make sure the sealant is approved for use with vapor barrier, some sealants won't adhere well to the vapor barrier. If there is enough plastic to lap up the side of ...


3

OK, my understanding is that you have a stove on a section of counter that doesn't have a wall immediately behind it. This could result in a "peninsula" design, or an outright "island". Either way, what you want is an "island-mount vent hood". They're designed to install in the ceiling instead of against a wall, for stoves that are out in the middle of a ...


3

Would it not be better to simply purchase a fan designed to be installed into a wall? It may well vary from fan to fan but all the ceiling exhaust fans I'm familiar with don't really like being mounted vertically. They are normally designed to correctly load their bearings only when ceiling mounted. If you do mount them vertically you can expect the ...


3

It shouldn't be a problem to vent the range hood out the wall, just make sure you check your local codes before doing so. I wouldn't think this would be a problem, but there could be different laws in densely populated areas as apposed to rural regions. And laws/codes can vary depending on your locale. Make sure you install the vent properly, and include ...


3

I don't think it's possible to individually control two different lights while controlling a common fan using conventional house wiring devices. Powering the fan will backfeed power to the other light that was supposed to stay off. But I look forward to being proven wrong. It can be done if both lights and the fan all go on at the same time. This is just a ...


3

The first thing to check is if the fan unit is properly and firmly mounted in the ceiling and that the actual motor/fan portion is tightly secured in the housing. If the vibration is being caused because the fan is unbalanced or the bearings are worn, there is probably not much you can do for it. New fan units are not that expensive and are much quieter than ...


3

Leaking air, or leaking water? If leaking air, either replace it if it's degraded, or try duct joint sealant (which stands a somewhat better chance of lasting than duct tape.) "Leaking" water - a bathroom exhaust vent needs to be heavily insulated all along its length, and should preferably run straight up, then turn and slope gently to the outside, so ...


2

Aside from the kitchen, I would say the bathroom is one of the most likely places for things to catch fire. You have: Water and electricity (never a great combination). Curling irons and hair dryers (often cheaply made & get very hot) Lots of flammable things (paint, wallpaper, drywall, cabinets, towels, etc.) Things that go boom (hair spray, air ...


2

As Shirlock says, cut the duct off of the cap, install the cap, and reattach the duct using a 6" scrap piece of metal ducting. Tape any joints with the HVAC foil tape. Another alternative, remove a bunch of shingles, install the cap and flashing straight in, and then install some new shingles over the flashing.


2

I just installed one of these combo fan/light/nightlight fixtures in my bathroom. We used a Leviton triple rocker switch like this one: We used cable with 4 wires between the switch and the fixture. The hot wire goes into the switch. The neutral connects to one of the 4 wires, the other 3 connect to the switch. At the fixture, the neutral is connected ...



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