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0

I don't think the use of these colours are standardised (outside of use in plain old-fashioned land-line telephone systems). I would disassemble the other end and see how the wires are connected up there. Most likely, two are connected to a push-to-make switch. If you are sure the system is unpowered, you could use a multimeter to check all 6 combinations ...


0

First of all, you are mistaken about your assumption that there is a difference in voltage on different size coils on an electric range top. The switches, wiring harness and sockets are the same for all the range top coils. there is no difference in voltage and all feeds are interchangeable except for the length of the wire feed that helps keep the ...


0

When properly installed the cladding of both AC and MC cables are always grounded (in most cases using identical connectors) and both cable types have always been installed in contact with most of the usual conductive building materials: steel studs, structural steel, ducts, plumbing and so on. And because Armored Cable has the bonding strip, its sheathing ...


1

If you have evidence of rodent damage to other wires in that location then maybe it's worth doing something more. But otherwise if using conduit is the more difficult method, I don't think I'd bother. If your garage is open framing and you can run from point A to point B in an approved NM fashion, that's the way to go. Nail a plastic 2 gang box to a 2 by and ...


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IMO in a commercial setting all receptacles, switches, jacks & the like should be installed at what is called counter height (about 48" to the top of the box). This not only satisfies ADA laws, but it keeps it all above most furniture, in sight for quick inventory, easy access, easy repair and upgrades. The days of crawling under desks and counters to ...


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Whoever told you the meter was the point of disconnect was dead wrong. The main panel or disconnect is the first means of overcurrent or disconnect. THIS is where your neutral bond must happen. 2011 NEC Article 250 Grounding and Bonding II. System Grounding 250.24 Grounding Service-Supplied Alternating-Current Systems (B) Main ...


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The grounded (neutral) conductor is bonded to ground in one location. It's common to bond the grounded (neutral) bus and the grounding bus in the panel, but it's not a requirement. The grounded (neutral) conductor can be bonded before the panel, but you'd then be required to keep the grounding and grounded (neutral) conductors separate after that point. So ...


0

I had this problem when there was something wrong with the wiring. Try tracing the wiring from the circuit and look at each junction box, socket, and fixture for a short. Pay extra attention to anything you may have moved or modified.


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There is no problem with installing junction boxes above a suspended ceiling, as long as the box is less than 100 in.³ and securely fastened. National Electrical Code has this to say... National Electrical Code 2014 Chapter 3 Wiring Methods and Materials Article 314 Outlet, Device, Pull, and Junction Boxes; Conduit Bodies; Fittings; and ...


3

You are on the right track. Junction boxes, with blank covers are allowed above a suspended ceiling as it is not considered a closed space. The wires that are loose and wirenuted need to be put in a j-box. Also, clamps need to be used at each wire going into a j-box. Some boxes have clamps pre-installed, if not, you need to use a RX connector in the ...


2

the 3 bulbs are 60W equivalent ecosmart compact fluorescent's This may be your problem. Many CF (compact fluorescent) bulbs are NOT designed to be dimmed. Try changing out your bulbs with "Dimmable" CFs.


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By FAR the best bet for billing questions and complaints is to call your POCO (power company). In my area they take high bill complaints very seriously and will send a representative out quickly. Also, things like this are absolutely NOT grounding/earthing issues. It is possible that it is a neutral problem and the grounding has become part of the issue ...


2

Often, electricians used ordinary black/red/green twin&earth for C but marked the black wire with red tape (to indicate "switched live") You seem to have something nonstandard, perhaps a spur (therefore missing B) without an earth to the switch? You'll have to use appropriate methods to determine what is what. See answer to similar old question ...


4

This has happened to me. You may have just manually tripped the breakers when you were putting the cover back on. It doesn't take much force to trip the breaker. It's unlikely that an electrical mis-wiring caused this, because each side of the box is fed alternatively by both of "hot" feed. Say you have split phase 1 and 2. The left side of your box ...


0

I had the same issue with a new fan that had all CFLs installed. I changed one CFL to an regular old fashioned bulb and the flickered stopped. I do have other fans with no issues and all CFLs.


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Sparks mean you just completed a live circuit. If you are working in any sort of electrical installation without first turning off the upstream breaker, STOP! Just stop what you're doing and call an electrician. You stand a good chance of getting yourself killed.


7

If the main breaker was on this would be expected if you put the breaker (in its on position) in before connecting the neutral and there was something turned on in the branch you were connecting. If something is drawing on a circuit there is going to be current flowing back through the neutral - that is what the neutral is for. It completes the circuit from ...


0

I am not an electrician, however I am an electrical engineering student, and have some experience with electricity. Shutting off the main is definitely not a bad idea, especially if you're going to work on the system. One thing you can do though, while the main is on, is test to see if the wiring was reversed in your panel or at an outlet. You can use an ...


0

Apart from electrical considerations, one should avoid having dissimilar metals in long-term contact, especially in what could be damp or humid conditions. Electrolytic corrosion could compromise one or the other of the metals. That's why, for example, you need to use copper clamps and copper nails to fasten copper water pipe...


2

There is no such thing as BX cable. Are you working with Type AC cable (armored cable), or Type MC cable (metal-clad cable)? Metal-Clad Cable (Type MC) Type MC cable has a grounding conductor, and the sheath cannot be used as a grounding conductor. If you're working with MC cable, it's not likely any fault condition could lead to the ducting becoming ...


2

Armored cable is meant to resist damage to the conductors from contact with other materials (like a duct). The armor itself is grounded when properly installed, and touching other metal should pose no risk (assuming the armor is not so bent or compressed as to expose the conductors).


1

Wiring colour conventions can vary worldwide, so as you don't state where you are located, it's not possible to give a definitive answer. In the UK for example (for single phase wiring), convention would have the live wire as brown (new colour) or red (old colour) and the neutral wire as blue (new colour) or black (old colour). It was not uncommon to see ...


1

The "California Three-Way" could be wired similar to what you have shown. Fundamentally, it wires each wire of one three-way switch to the corresponding wire of the other; if the switches are in opposite positions, each switch will form a connection between the wiper and one other terminal, and thus the two non-wiper terminals will be connected. The ...


2

Many switches that need a neutral have equivalent versions from other brands that do not need a neutral. You may be able to find a switch that has the functionality you want without doing additional wiring. While current code requires a neutral at switches, you are allowed to replace existing switches without rewiring if the neutral is not present. If that ...


1

Stop! Before you start drilling holes everywhere - take a look at Homeplug adapters. Plug one in near your Cable Modem. Run ethernet from the modem to the plug. Plug another one in downstairs near your TV Run ethernet from the plug to your TV Hey presto! Your Internet connection now runs over your power lines. Depending on the age and the quality of ...


1

I have run the odd cable in my house (wood frame, wallboard) by drilling down from the attic into the hollow wall. There's a 2x4 at the top of the wall, with vertical 2x4 studs. I've mounted a junction box on the stud by cutting into the wall, then made a small pilot hole into the attic through the ceiling to register the main hole through the 2x4. Then use ...


0

I have been planning to install receptacles in my home for 12 volt dc. I decided to use a 15 or 20 amp outlet that is designed for 277 volt, the configuration is nema 7-20R or 7-15R. It looks like a regular 120 volt receptacle but the hot and neutral slots are set at a 45 degree angle so I won't accident plug into 120-240 volt. use the silver terminal for ...


2

If you don't have much experience running wire, an easy option in some cases is to run the wire along the exterior of the house. You punch out the wire at the source, run along the siding, under the gutters, etc. and then drill through the wall to bring it into the house. This is easiest on exterior walls, but you can also bring the wire into the attic and ...


4

Having done a LOT of this over the years, your options are basically - find something else to follow, go plenum-rated and use ductwork if you have it as @Comintern suggests in a comment, run wires on the surface or go though a lot of agony trying not to open up walls. In many cases, opening up walls would be a lot less agony. There are often inconvenient ...


0

The top element is always the first one on. In fact the bottom element does not receive power until the top thermostat is satisfied. I’m guessing that setting your top thermostat to a 150 would give you small amount of really hot water rather quickly, while setting the upper and lower thermostats evenly to a moderate temperature (115-125) would be your ...


0

If you have a voltage reading between hot and ground but not hot and neutral, it means you have an open neutral somewhere between the bulb and the panel. Since you were playing around in the fixture, that'd be the first place I'd check. Remove all of the wirenuts and check the quality of the connections, both from the line as well as the socket. If the ...


1

Or: A completely different approach to the problem. If the compressor is really the only thing driving you to want more power in the garage, and the electrical service in the garage, as it stands, would suit your needs adequately otherwise...move the compressor. Build it a "doghouse" in the yard where you can run a dedicated (and shorter) electrical line ...


1

tl;dr - if you are going to all the work, and a subpanel, you presumably want a bit more than 20 amps (think it needs to be 30 amps minimum for code these days, and 60 amps is probably better.) You'll have to dig a ditch. At that point, my opinionated opinion is that you should go ahead and put in conduit, and an additional conduit for any current or future ...


1

I wouldn't rule out the use of Sch40 PVC here. In fact I would consider a length of sch40 PVC glued to the hub of a PVC box all well fastened to the wall a far superior choice, and it's virtually allowed per 334.15(B) "...or other approved means..." EMT and metal boxes mounted to damp below grade masonary walls have way too many issues for me: possible ...


1

CFM: Cubic Feet per Minute. It is the same unit for both. Note that computer fans are not rated or listed for such use or permanent installation and might not like getting wet. I don't doubt that such a setup would work but I would test it first with some power adapters (12VDC, common for 120mm fans) before looking at solar panels. As the exact power ...


2

It depends on which side of the switch is the line (power source from the box) and which side is the load (light and outlets). If the two wire cable is the line and the three wire is the load, you may be able to use the red wire to carry uninterupted power to the outlets. The next question is whether the light or the outlets come next in the circuit, and ...


0

If you twist the outlet back and forth while pulling on the wire, usually the wire will walk itself off. However, you should not re-use the wires you remove in such a manner as they will be scratched and scarred. With that in mind, just cut them flush with the outlet and strip the wire fresh.


1

Unless the wires are way too short, just cut them off - it's not worth wasting your time for 1/2" of wire. You can use wirenuts and add a pigtail if you need more wire. If the wires are way too short, and the circuit is dead, put on safety glasses and use a hammer or locking pliers or a bolt cutter to smash the crap receptacle and release your wires quickly. ...


1

A short circuit is a fire hazard, though it may not require rewiring the house to repair. When this happens, identify all affected outlets and lights. Then, when the circuit is normal, locate section of wire that must contain the fault by separating the line and load at various points to map out the circuit. When you disconnect the hot at one point in the ...


-2

there might be a wire cracked somewhere in that circuit. It might expands because of the electricity's flow ( elector-magnetic field ) and cause the interruption.


0

If you are using a simple outlet tester you could get a false positive. You should always use something that draws some decent current, like a lamp. Here is a related story. I unplug the electric clothes dry recently while cleaning the ducting. My wife plugged it back in afterward. From then on, although the drum turned fine, the heat was intermittent. ...


0

I wan't able to find installation instructions from any of the major receptacle manufacturers. Though I was able to find this video from Leviton (a major manufacturer of electrical devices, in the United States). The video demonstrates how to install a receptacle (there's also a version on YouTube), and clearly shows the installer using both sets of ...


2

Mike quotes the code (300.13B Device Removal) but misunderstands what it means. The paragraph's 1st sentence starts out, "In multiwire branch circuits,". That means where 2 or 3 circuits with 1 shared neutral wire are passing through a box. You'll probably never see this kind of wiring in a home, but if you have 2 or 3 circuits sharing a neutral in the same ...


9

You have an open or compromised service neutral. PLEASE call your power company immediately to have them check their connections. It is also very possible you'll need an electrician to check/repair/replace the terminations in the meter pan. I have to ask, do you own this house? If not then calling your landlord is your ONLY option.


-1

The way to learn how to handle high-current circuits (e.g. mains!) is to become an electrician. The people who design and create the sort of home-automation devices you seem to want to build have training and certification in all the relevant areas. That said, if you can find someone who is qualifies and does have experience, they can supervise you whilst ...


2

Are the bulbs you got made for dimmable applications? Unless the LED explicitly says that it is dimmer compatible, it may not always work at different voltages. The characteristics of each make and model of LED are different, so it's a bit of a crap shoot as to whether they'll work at each voltage put out by the dimmer.


1

There's these things known as Circuit Breakers, switch them off on the circuit you are working on. Working on live circuits is only for linemen working on the grid and eventually dead DIY people. All it takes is one little slipup and you've bought your halo.


1

You got terrible advice. Head to a library, get a book on home repair. Head to a toy store, get an electronics kit for beginners. Experiment for a while. Happy April 1st, if you're celebrating.


0

For USA jobs, the national electric code mandates a minimum of 1 1/4" from the edge of the wood to the cable (reference NEC Section 300-4). In other words, if your screw mounts less than about an inch into the wood, and the wire was installed correctly, you're fine. I'd recommend using a bracket with a series of shorter screws rather than one big one. ...


1

If the mounting hardware would hit a cable, you need only move the mirror a few inches to avoid it. Cut a small hole in the drywall / plaster and look in the wall. See where the cables go and hang the mirror in a way that doesn't hurt them. Cut the hole in a place that the mirror will cover, and you don't need to worry about doing a good repair job on it. ...



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