New answers tagged

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As TFK mentioned, this is likely not going to be an easy task. It will surely require installing new wiring, and modifying the existing wiring. However, you have not provided anywhere near the detail required, for somebody on the other side of the internet to tell you how to do it. If you're not experienced with electrical work, you're likely going to have ...


0

Just turn off the main generator breaker. Then it won't kick on.


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There are too many unknowns here for us to help you out. We don't know which switches you intend to use afterwards (locations), what access you have to joining the circuits together, or what the possibilities of joining them would be without knowing of your personal setup. Your setup, roughly as described to us is... <--- S --- S --- Kitchen Lights ...


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I don't believe you have four way switches. Four way switches do not have commons as they do not control the light directly, they simply break the path of two other three ways. Three ways have 3 screws, four ways have 4. (And the ground) Next, (to answer your question) since the exterior light only works when one of the switches are on, most likely you've ...


2

Simply turning off the breaker that feeds the furnace will turn off the thermostat power as well.


1

This kind of tester will tell if the wire is hot. A bad return path (white wire) could be the cause. Also the lamp can be bad, but you said both quit so I would check to see if the neutral wiggled loose.


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It absolutely makes a difference. If you attach the hot from the mains to the ground on the fixture, it will most likely energize the entire fixture body (extremely dangerous). Assuming that you're in the United States (or another 120v country), there should be a faint green stripe visible through the insulation on the ground wire. If you can't make it ...


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If this is a simple 115 volt system then running the wire from your switch is the wrong way of doing it unless the two wire power supply goes into the switch box to use. The answer telling you to extend the power and nutural wires plus ground from the light to the fan is the only way to control the light and fan together, that's a plus for Tester101


1

By string lights are you refering to something like a string of christmas lights. If this is what you mean then remove the buld and replace it. If you don't have a replacement bulb, cover the opening with tape just so nobody sticks their finger in the opening and you're good to go. Plug it in and let there be light.


-1

I'm unsure why you disconnected it to begin with but first I would make sure you reconnected it properly and it's not connected to a similar type of breaker as well in the panel. Depending on the location of it and what was being used for, these outlets do go bad and in the end need to be replaced. If you recheck all the wiring connections and they are done ...


1

If the device is not wired probably, it will not set. Make sure you've wired the LINE and LOAD terminals properly. Make sure you use the markings on the device, and don't simply wire it how the old one was. The LINE terminals are where the wires coming from the source should connect, while the LOAD terminals are where the wires going to other devices ...


1

Actually, it was the reset button, which needed to be pressed after flipping the breaker switch on.


1

It's either an intentional product feature (i.e. To serve as a night light) or an ...unintentional bug which would require really exceptionally bad design. If this is a quality premium unit, I would expect the former; if it's a bargain priced thing from China perhaps the latter. But it would be really unusual for a product defect to leave a tiny bit of ...


1

The first answer is a good one but if you think you put everything back together as it was, check the recepticle to make sure there is nothing shorting out in there or better yet, just change it with a new one. The white wire colored black should most likely be connected to a black wire and if it's connected with the whites you have a dead short, disconnect ...


5

Not all white wires are "neutrals", and not all "neutrals" are white. Some white wires are in fact used as "hots", especially those that are marked with black tape/marker/paint, and/or connected to single pole snap switches. You should put everything back the way you found it, and contact a local licensed Electrician. Better yet, just shut off the breaker ...


1

You need to swap the cord on your range for a 3-pin range cord (NEMA 10-50) and configure the bonding jumper appropriately, then install a NEMA 10-50 receptacle for your stove. (This is allowed for existing branch circuits, just not new ones.)


0

Some possibilities: 1. Your suction exhaust pipe (or flapper) may have a partial obstruction or a stuck flapper that temporarily reduces air flow when you first start vacuuming. Ensure there are no partial obstructions in your piping & that you flapper isn't sticking. Note: Rodents can sometimes die & get stuck in central vacuum piping/tubing. ...


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There are two approaches to this problem: use dual pole switches to control the fan and each light simultaneously -- this is the best approach if the lights and fan all are on the same circuit from the panel use a dual relay to control the fan circuit from the light circuits -- this is the best approach if the fan and lights are on separate circuits, or if ...


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What you propose is indeed possible. How difficult it is, depends on what wiring is currently in place. You should start by connecting all the bare/green grounding conductors in the switch box together, including a pigtail to both switches. Other than that, it sounds like the wiring in the switch box is good to go. If you want to control the fan with a ...


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I realize this is an old question, however I just wanted to mention something... Tester101 indicated not to drill too many holes within the joist, as it could weaken it and cause structural damage. I thought I should clarify something... The principal force that is applied to a floor joist is moment. With that, you get tensile along the bottom edge, and ...


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Maybe you CAN do this. You cannot send current up one cable and down another. Wires are grouped for a reason, so magnetic fields cancel out. Anything inside a loop of wire becomes the core of a toroid, which is much more powerful than you think, especially if there is any metal inside. Are you saying both 12/3’s power a circuit on their black wire, and ...


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You should definitely pull a new cable for the washing machine circuit. Problems with your solution You can't use a red wire as a neutral (See NEC 200.6(A)). Circuit conductors (wires) must be contained in the same "raceway, auxiliary gutter, cable tray, cablebus assembly, trench, cable, or cord" (See NEC 300.3(B)). You have not clearly described where ...


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This would be called a multi wire branch circuit. The circuit breaker for the red and black wires must be on adjacent circuit breakers for it to be legal. The red black also need to be identified so the wiring doesn’t get separated at a later date as that would undersize your neutral. This is legal because 1 wire is on L1 and 1 wire is on L2 the return ...


3

Assume we have 6 switches (S1-S6) and 5 lamps (L1-L5) -- also assume that we don't want any lights in the stairs on when the stairs are not in use by anyone (even if there's someone on top of the tower), and that someone walking up the final flight of stairs doesn't want the light below them on. Finally, we can assume that nobody's flipping light switches ...


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I'm a little confused by the dimmer switch based on your post, so hopefully you'll correct that and I'll finish this answer. However, to start you off on a new front that you might not have considered: go ahead and draw in 3-wire cabling between every item. You already know the layout that they have to be in and the maximum wires. Although it's for bonus ...


2

I'd first check if someone incorrectly wired a single half switched receptacle. To do this, you're going to need to check the outlets for a hot and then determine how the circuit is run through the walls for the switch. Turn off the switch and check outlets to see if there's still a hot connection anywhere. I'd try with a non-contact tester first, and if ...


4

As Wolf says, a combination of SPDT and DPDT switches. One switch on each floor, top and bottom are SPDT, all others are DPDT. The number of switches is one more than the number of lights. Here are a couple of ways to wire it: The left diagram shows the sane way. Blue is the neutral leg. The right diagram shows how to use the Carter three-way pattern to ...


0

Sounds like 3-way switches. Two of them, ganged together so they throw on the same physical switch handle. It's like a single 3-way is SPDT, 2 ganged 3-ways is DPDT. So, 1st floor lighting controlled by 1st floor and 2nd floor. 2nd floor lighting controlled by 1st floor and 3rd floor. 3rd floor: 2nd and 4th. Etc.


2

There are a couple things you can do depending on what the cause is. If the entire cover plate stands proud of the wall, then it probably means the receptacle itself is not far enough back. Make sure it is screwed all the way into the box and that the box is set at a proper depth into the wall. If it's unfeasible to adjust the box, and you're only dealing ...


3

The following assumes that only one switch controls the outlets. Turn the breaker off to the outlets. Confirm there is no power with an outlet tester. Remove the switch cover. Loosen the switch. Confirm there is no power to the switch using a no-contact tester. Remove the two wires attached to the switch (should be a combination of black, red or white). ...


3

You have a Square-D Type QO (3/4" wide) breaker there. These are ridiculously common -- just about every big-box store and electrical supply house will have them, as well as industrial MRO suppliers and even small hardware stores. The other possibilities can be ruled out as follows: Eaton's CH fits a similar 3/4" form factor, but obviously would have ...


1

Sounds like a dead thermostat. When it was working before, it hadn't died yet. Why it died is likely to remain a mystery. Things don't live forever (neither do people - dragons might, per one song.) Replace it.


6

I can see a SquareD logo on the side, and the red indicator window on the front makes it look like a Square D QO 20-Amp Single-Pole Circuit Breaker, model #QO120CP: The overall shape of the breaker and orientation of the contacts on the back seem to match your breaker.


1

First, just to prevent any confusion, it's a "3-way" switch setup, not 2-way. 3-way switches take power in (or let it out) through a singular wire, which then is switched between two 'traveler' wires. It's referred to as a 3-way switch for the same reason as a 3-way intersection - there are 3 paths in/out of the switch. Next, you need to ensure that the ...


1

Yes, it should work. I found this wiring diagram below on Thermador's website. It's for a 4 speed blower, but it's basically the same concept for the electrician except one less wire. Black, red, and blue are the three speeds. White is the neutral. Green is the ground. This diagram might not be relevant to your model or installation and so any information ...


1

If this is one of your 2 20A small appliance circuits the lighting should not be on it NEC handbook exhibit 210.28. I think it is always a bad idea to have a refrigerator on a small appliance circuit but it is allowed by code. If this is in addition to the 2 small appliance branch circuits for the kitchen countertop area it is legal.


1

Yes, you can. Although I'd watch what you use with these receptacles as you could easily trip the breaker with the refrigerator on there too. Also, I doubt those LED lights are 50W. They're probably much lower unless each fixture is like a chandelier with multiple bulbs.


0

also those NON-contact voltage detectors are all different, even identical model/brand. i've always found that alot of them detect voltage from 1-inch and greater distances. i've gotten lucky with a pair of Klien ones that won't detect until your actually touching the wires insulation. i recently bought a really nice looking one with a vibration motor and ...


2

No. While ground may be tied to the earth, it's also connected back to the source (distribution transformer). Electricity doesn't flow from the transformer to the earth, it flows from the transformer back to the transformer. Only connecting the grounding conductor to the earth, will not provide an effective ground-fault path. So a ground-fault will not ...


0

You could use the UPS to defer some of the load while the microwave runs. I did this as a kid. I had only 15 amps to live on in my room, and my microwave are up a good ten of them. So I kept a 3000kva ups charged and ready, and when I used the microwave a load sensor I installed anr programmed automatically isolated the UPS from mains and my computer ran ...


0

Yes. Evacuate the house immediately and do not return. Call your insurance company and have them total the entire building and by you a new home. Tell your neighbors they should vacate the area as well. It's not that serious. But yes. You should avoid all temptations to lick or touch the metal conductors of those wires directly with your skin. Whoever ...


1

Yes, that should be very straightforward. Simply wire the switch to interrupt the "W" wire, which is the one the thermostat uses to ask for heat. Its request will be unanswered obviously. Do this between the thermostat and what I presume is a big relay with a 24v coil that switches the 240v power on to the heaters. Turn the 240v off at the breakers ...


6

Those are indeed hazardous "exposed wires", and you should take immediate precautions to make it impossible for anyone to inadvertently touch them. Ideally, you'd turn off power to that circuit and either keep it turned off, or while the power is off cover the exposed wires securely with an insulating device (a securely fastened wire nut, electrical tape, ...


3

The fuse is there to prevent your wires from burning up in the walls. A UPS is for a short supply of backup power when the power goes out - not to bypass the tripping of a fuse/breaker. If you're not able to move these loads to different circuits, then you shouldn't use them all at once or allow them to be used together. You don't want to bypass a safety ...


0

They sense the electromagnetic field of the conductors. They are a first line item and not to be relied upon for accurate measuring. Electricians use them just to let us know if there is power in a junction box or conduit. From there if we want more accurate information we use a regular voltage tester. They will occasionally tell you there is power on a ...


2

Changing an element us not difficult. Turn the power off. Turn the water to the water heater off. Drain the tank. Some models require a special wrench some a crescent wrench will work. Unscrew the conductors that attach to the element. Unscrew the element. If it comes with an O ring a very light coating of vegetable oil on the O ring will help it seal. If it ...


1

Simply move it further towards the right on the wall (closer to the door) so that it clears the meter and you're good. The clear space required is... Depth: 36" [NEC 2014 110.26(A)(1)] In front of the box. As long as you're over to the right far enough that the meter isn't directly in front of the left corner of the transfer enclosure, you're clear. ...


0

Yes, it is possible and relatively easy since it is all low voltage and simple circuitry. If you have multiple heat zones, you need to be sure you have the termostat controlling the basement zone. If you have one heat zone for the whole house, just set up the thermostat in parallel with the other thermostat(s) in the house. Note, you might want to use a ...


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I think your location may have more than 1 issue. Normally the maximum height is 6-1/2’. The door on the transfer switch must be able to be opened to 90 Degrees. The space in front of the opening usually requires 36”. These requirements are in the NEC 110.26(a)(1), 110.26.2 & 110.26.3.


1

Typically there are two hot wires coming into a fan box that has separate switches for the fan and light kit. Typically the black is used for the fan, and the red is for the light kit. That said, other color combinations are possible. Typically, the blue wire from your fan/light combo supplies the light kit. Whichever of the two hot wires was connected to ...



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