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2

Sounds like you have one black hot wire coming into the box (probably that bottom one), which passed through a hot over to your bedroom switch. So my guess would be that you should have two of the blacks wirenutted together -- that would be the hot wire coming in to the box, and the passthrough to the bedroom light. Also in that bundle should be two ...


2

In general, this is a sign of a circuit loaded a bit too heavily. After an outage, everything is starting at once - motor loads, in particular, tend to draw a very large current at startup - if a circuit has several motor loads which do not usually start at the same time, it may not trip in normal service, but if all the motor loads start at the same time, ...


1

14in light is a useless figure. What you're looking for is lumens. ("Replaces a X watt incandescent" is also useful, though affected by marketing a bit.) Get a target lumen value, then get a lighting setup that meets this value. LEDs vs fluorescents doesn't matter for getting enough light, just for power-saving purposes. Before you replaced the lights, was ...


0

For a 200A residential service in the US or Cananda typical would be 4/0-4/0-2/0AL or 2/0-2/0-1/0CU conductors. Either combination would normally be run in 2" conduit. This is only scratching the surface of what you need to know to do this project. Are you aware and knowledgeable of all the other requirements/codes/etc???


2

At least one of the tabs on the old 1/2 switched outlet (the hot side) must have been snapped off, or it couldn't be 1/2 switched, it would have to be all switched. You describe only 3 wires (2 whites + one red), but there should be 2 non-white wires: one always-hot wire for the unswitched side of the outlet (should be black), and one switched hot wire ...


1

You need 4 wires for a subpanel (neutral and ground separated) - as such, 6AWG is all that fits - 4 AWG would require 1" conduit at a minimum (even for 3 wires.) I don't keep this in my head - I use this, or one like it: http://www.electrician2.com/calculators/rf_calculator.html


2

The old boxes in their current location will be decommissioned. Whether they get caps, or are removed and the holes patched over is an aesthetic question and up to you (as @Kris says). Since you have access from the attic, you have two choices as expressed in your question leave existing wire and boxes connected, shift them, and add wiring and a third box ...


3

There's no technical reason that he can't move the boxes. It would certainly be more elegant. My best guess is that your electrician doesn't like drywall repair/ painting. If the ceiling is textured, that's a strong disincentive, as matching texture is hard. He'll definitely save you money with his approach.


0

Option 1 A less expensive option if you don't mind having a plate behind the refrigerator is to put a 3 gang blank plate over the existing 3 gang switch box. Then feed out of it with the necessary wires to the other side. The electrical is pretty basic as all you would be doing is extending the switch loops/legs to the new 3 gang box. You do not ...


4

I would avoid any interference with a load-bearing beam (which you do well to point out). Drilling holes -or space for a receptacle- will surely make it more fragile. Instead of that, the option of switching the switches from one side of the wall to the opposite side may be attractive. Basically, you would need to disconnect and take out the switches from ...


10

The trap doors serve a few purposes in plastic boxes: They keep stuff in. Sparks, flames, and other rogue electrical gremlins. They keep stuff out. Fingers, pets, or anything else capable of getting electrocuted or causing a short. They act as the cable clamps for non-metallic cables entering the electrical box. Fire proof foam or caulk would likely ...


0

Pardon my wordiness below – I just wanted to be as clear as possible, and hope some of it will be useful. I have not searched the NEC re. crimp/solderless connectors so I will not address that question. As someone who also has a strong preference for stranded wire, however, I will offer some suggestions that might alleviate some compliance concerns – based ...


3

Yes, that is precisely correct. Though I prefer red tape, but that's a preference, not a requirement to go buy a roll. Nicer (IMHO) because you can easily mark switched hots whether they be black or white.


3

It doesn't sound like the #14 and #12 grounding wires being connected is the issue, to me. EDIT: NEC 250.148 (C) Metal Boxes. A connection shall be made between the one or more equipment grounding conductors and a metal box by means of a grounding screw that shall be used for no other purpose, equipment listed for grounding, or a listed grounding ...


-1

I think this is partially common sense. If the total combined load exceeds 2x the branch circuit grounds capacity then you should not piggyback more grounds into the branch circuit. For example a # 10 copper ground will hold up to 60 amps. This is why #6-3 NM ground is sized as #10, not as a # 6. That is 2x the capacity of the non-grounded conductors. ...


3

Lighting branches didn't require grounds back then, so that probably explains why your closet was left ungrounded (I'm assuming there's no receptacles in there). My house was built in 1987 and I've fought a few ground battles on lighting circuits as well. There should be no issue connecting your grounds. It's possible that your ground's continuity is broken ...


2

According to National Electrical Code, the water piping must be bonded to the service equipment enclosure, the grounded conductor at the service (service "neutral"), the grounding electrode conductor (where large enough), or directly to one or more of the grounding electrodes. The bonding jumper is to be sized using Table 250.66. For 200 ampere service, ...


-3

Having a big ground does not matter if all the other wires are tiny because they will melt before the ground does. As long as the ground is bigger than any of the wires in the house, then it is sufficient. Usually the biggest wire is the one going to the oven or a dryer. The amperage rating of the box does not matter at all. For example, the box is 500 amps ...


3

You'd have to remove the bonding jumper, and install a separate grounding bar. Notice in this image, there are clearly separate grounding bars installed.


1

You can buy connectors made specifically to join stranded and unstranded wires For example Wago lighting connectors can be used in nearly all electrical connections where a connection between solid and fine-stranded conductors is required for household and similar purposes in buildings. Applications can be, for example, automated blinds or awnings, ...


0

We resolved the problem with the portable AC by purchasing a heavy-duty, 15-amp, 12-gauge extension cord and running it from the bathroom to the AC by the window. Since the bathroom is on its own circuit, the AC does not trip the breaker. A big thank you to those who suggested this in the comments. Ironically, management has decided to replace our central ...


3

Be sure you use a 30A double-pole breaker to adequately protect your wiring. Make sure you provide an equipment ground and use a NEMA 14-30 receptacle. The box can be metal or plastic. Some form of cable clamp is always required, it's just that most plastic boxes have an integrated clamp (that finger-trap style door). If using NM cable, The cable must be ...


2

It sounds like you are converting from a fan that did not have a remote control to one that does. In many older fan/light setups, power came to the wall switch with just two wires, hot (black) and neutral (white). There usually was also a ground wire, most commonly bare, but sometimes green. In many cases the incoming hot line was connected to two switches, ...


0

The electrician may be quoting the cost of replacing the breaker with a 15A breaker, instead of changing out the 14 for 12. I agree with your concern, 100 feels quite cheap, 400-500 may be in the ballpark, you'd want to get an electrician in there to give you an estimate in person, though. What seems difficult to you may actually be simple. (it may also ...


3

To do this properly, You'll likely have to run a new circuit. Since you haven't posted the make, model, or nameplates of the equipment, it's impossible to say for sure if these two devices can be on the same circuit. If they can, the solution is to extend the circuit using approved methods and materials. If they can't, the solution is to run a new circuit. ...


0

AS WE KNOW 1 TR = 3.516 KW FOR 5TR IT IS= 3.516X5 =17.58 KW CURRENT FOR 430 V SUPPLY = 17.58X1000/(1.73*430*0.9) ASSUMING pf 0.9 =17580/669.51 =26.2 AMP (APPROX)


3

From the information that you gave so far it would seem pretty conclusive that the red wire has broken open between your test outlet box and the power panel. Did the red wire circuit outlets ever work? If they did work at one time can you think of any key events that may have occurred between them working and not working? Think about things like ...


1

Alway trun off the power. I use Klein Linemans/Pliers to twist the solid wires together, making sure that all the plastic covering of the wires line up. Next I strip the stranded wire, a little longer then the solid wire, and that the plastic covering of the wire lines up and twist the stranded wire around the solid wire with the pliers. Next using the ...


2

Is this for AC wiring (more permanent house wiring, that needs to meet code, or for something else? If I were you, I would look into wire nuts, they may be able to get it done the cheapest/most effective. Also check out the splices used in this question about grounding Grounding wires


5

If that was installed in 1958, the wire may or may not have PVC insulation. If it's the old rubber insulation, it's going to be brittle. Bending the wires could crack and compromise the insulation. Also, it's virtually guaranteed that there is no ground wire in that fixture. You should check local electrical code to make sure that replacing the fixture ...


2

The decision as to whether you have to remove and replace the existing light box rests on a number of factors. The electrical wire hookup to the existing light box appears that it may be under the access lid toward the rear part of the box in your picture. There will be a question as to whether the existing wiring will be long enough to make it to the ...


0

Inside that small access hatch in your picture you will likely find the original wire connections in a small box. Make sure that power is turned OFF either at the switch (tape the switch in the off position and put a note there so nobody turns it on while you are working) or at the circuit breaker/fuse panel. Open the access hatch and disconnect the power to ...


7

Those certainly looks like doorbell electromagnets, so my guess is you are correct in assuming it is a doorbell chime unit. Maybe a previous owner removed the door button. Doorbell chime with electromagnets visible, for comparison: My idea at the moment is to shut off the main breaker (since I don't know which one this is on), unscrew the wires, ...


4

If you have a circuit where you need both AFCI and GFCI protection for some reason, yes, these breakers are fine to use, and no, you do not need additional GFI receptacles. That would be redundant and waste $$$. Yes, you definitely would need to go to the breaker panel to reset a tripped breaker. There is no such thing as a "remote reset". You also should ...


0

The answer to your only stated question is YES. To independently switch 2 different things you need to have 2 switched hot wires, you would have to run an additional wire from the wall switch location to the ceiling location. The statement that "the light only has 14/2 running to the switch" tells us that one of those wires is a hot lead to the switch, the ...


3

It sounds like the two black wire with the pigtail are the incoming hot and a branch hot to another location, such as the outlet. The other black attached to the switch is probably the switched hot that goes to the fixture being controlled. You can verify this by turning the switch to off, making sure all the wires and terminals are clear and not touching ...


2

Shouldn't be a problem. If the garage has a habit of filling with water, you'll need to use conduit and conductors rated for wet locations. Otherwise I can't think of any problems. You'll have to use conduit that can be subject to physical damage. To be sure, contact your local building department.


1

If you absolutely have to use a long extension cord I would use a 10 gauge. I also would feel the cord for heating as another caution. Some may feel this is overkill but like I said if you MUST use an extension cord these are my thoughts.


3

What size conduit should I use? (I was thinking 3/4") Since you're pulling more than 2 wires through the conduit, you're only going to be able to fill the conduit to 40%. Since you didn't specifically mention what type of conduit you're using, I'll list all metallic and PVC conduit. 3/4" Intermediate Metal Conduit (IMC) @40% = 0.235 in.² 3/4" ...


2

You should be able squeeze one of the connection heads and pull them apart. Some light kit also have a little tab on the side of the connector that have to be push in or pulled apart to release them.


2

It sounds like two of your red wires form a switch loop to one of your switches. The remaining red wire is the hot (I believe called active in Australia?) coming into your ceiling. By connecting them all together, you have wired your light (and switch) directly to your unswitched power, which is why it stays on. You'll need a multimeter, voltage tester, or ...


0

/The aluminum to copper splice connector that I use is the AlumiConn 95104 which fits wire from #18 to #10. Remember that aluminum wire is larger than copper for the same capacity current. These connectors are available at Lowes for about $6.50 for a package of 2.


2

The broken part is a thermal fuse. Here is a link to the part You should be able to pull the broken parts out of the end of the wires. They are just simple spade terminals.


1

Some alternative possibilities would be: Build a separate (waterproof) vertical conduit to contain and isolate the water system - both incoming pipes and what looks to be a drain on the right of the image. This would not need to be very large, perhaps 1 foot square could be enough. Move the water valves down as low as possible. The rationale being that the ...


0

Another way would be to tighten the valves so much that it won’t leak. Make sure the nut is also fixed properly. It depends on how frequently you will open the valve. If it is too frequent it’s better you change the place of the switches or relocate the valves.


-1

True. Three phase power may be supplied in residents according to the authority having jurisdiction. Here in Louisiana three phase power is forbidden in residential areas and limited to commercial and industrial applications. However, I do know a couple of rich guys who actually have their homes powered by three phase distribution. I don't mean to be rude ...


0

More headaches are caused by floating/open, high resistance/loose, corroded,bad connections anywhere along the neutral in any 120VAC phase to neutral system! Neutals are current carrying conductors in single phase 120VAC systems which need to be properly grounded and have a clean low impedance connection all the way back to their source of power;.. the ...


-1

It is hard to say, but it looks like it is bolted to the metal frame, so I think it may be the ground for the frame. Okay now that you have more pictures Longneck is correct. It was hard to tell from the first angle.


3

According to the National Electrical Code, a gas furnace (or any other central heating equipment) must be on its own circuit. So connecting a water heater (or anything else), would be a code violation. National Electrical Code 2014 Chapter 4 Equipment for General Use Article 422 Appliances 422.12 Central Heating Equipment. Central heating ...


3

Indeed, a range is another name for a freestanding electric oven/cooktop combination. As to your tripping problem -- random trips on different circuits with no sign of an overload is a sign that the breaker panel busbars are on their way out, and trying to burn your house down in the process. Get a good electrician (or three) in there to get the panel ...



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