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1

I think this depends on the quality of your old outlets. A lot of times builders might use the lowest quality for outlets and I have gone through houses that were 10-15 years old and just spent a day replacing them all. However with GFCIs it is not very common for these to be cheaply made. They would have to probably be quite a bit older than 10 years ...


1

I seriously doubt that a meaningful quantity of GFCIs fail after only 10 years. Maybe that's just the typical warranty length. If you're concerned, GFCI outlets have a test function, which simulates a ground fault (or use your GFCI tester, which probably does the same thing). Test them monthly, if you desire.


1

You will need to separate the neutrals -- this is both unsafe as already explained and a 200.4(A) violation: Installation. Neutral conductors shall not be used for more than one branch circuit, for more than one multiwire branch circuit, or for more than one set of ungrounded feeder conductors unless specifically permitted elsewhere in this ...


0

Since you are asking, seems like you are concerned. If its a matter of being proactive or having piece of mind, At $10-$15 an outlet do one a month and have a safer piece of mind. You can read about AFCI Breakers/Outlets and replace the ones in your bedrooms too. http://www.ehow.com/info_8324361_afci-receptacle-outlet.html ...


1

Yes! I do that all the time. I use my own "standard" conventions: Use the red wire for the "switched hot", black for "always hot". Make it the top half of the receptacle that is switched. Mark the switched half of the receptacle with a dot or something, to show it is switched.


1

I suppose there seems to be some confusion of what you can or cannot do, and unfortunately it seems that this is determined by a permitting process. Electrical codes are not a hoop you jump through to pass inspection. They are for protecting life and property. Is the loss of life permissible in the absence of the permit; if something goes bad and another ...


0

If the power company did not change the bonding point, you still have a main panel ("the one with the bond in it.") So long as there's only one, the location of the bond can and does vary with the preferences of the power company, mostly. Mine is inside the meter box, so my panel is wired as a sub-panel. On a typical panel run from a meter and bonded in ...


0

As was mentioned above, check your neutral source. I've seen the same situation and what cured it for me was tightening down the screw holding the neutral to the bus bar in the breaker box (after turning the box off of course). While I was at it I found a couple other screws holding down neutrals that were loose by a screw turn or less. It is always a good ...


3

First off, the first electrician is wrong in saying that the use of a crimp-type terminal in house wiring is categorically unsafe. Crimp-type terminals listed under UL 486A for use on solid wire of the given gauge are considered acceptable for use in building wiring, as per UL 486A section 1.1: These requirements cover pressure wire connectors and ...


0

Use a non-contact voltage detector pen to check the ground screw/strap of each outlet -- if hot is present on the outlet ground terminal (i.e. the reverse polarity bootleg ground that has been alluded to by other answers), it will light up brightly and/or beep at you as soon as you put it near the hot outlet ground strap; on a properly wired outlet, you'll ...


0

Point 1 -- a GFCI is the best protection against shock you can reasonably put on a 120V mains circuit, grounded or not. Point 2 -- leave the ungrounded outlets ungrounded if you cannot put a new home run in! Bootleg or otherwise improper grounding can be very dangerous to life, limb, and equipment when combined with reversed polarity due to 120VAC flowing ...


0

NEC 2011 210.19 (A)(2) Branch Circuits with More than One Receptacle. Conductors of branch circuits supplying more than one receptacle for cord and plug connected portable loads shall have an ampacity of not less than the rating of the branch circuit. This tells me that the circuit should be pig tailed ...


2

Short answer is no, not a good idea to do this. First, splicing cords is a bad idea as they become fire hazards. A splice drastically weakens the cord possibly allowing the conductors to separate which then will cause sparking. The other, is the dimmer. The manufacture of the lamp most likely used the cheapest dimmer possible to run the lamp. Putting ...


4

Considering the age of the home, the only complaint, and in my opinion safe, alternative is to have a new circuit run to the bathroom for the GFI. It is almost guaranteed that in a bath a hair dryer will be used, which is a huge draw for a general use circuit. So adding a receptacle to the existing wiring will not only not be code complaint, it will stress ...


0

Yes you can, and it must be a GFCI. But watch out for overloading the circuit. It should be fine for an electric toothbrush or curling iron, but a 1200W hairdryer might blow fuses/breaker depending on what else is on the circuit.


0

Most likely you can pull power from an existing work box that has a switch, as long as you don't overload the circuit. This is a pretty common wiring task, but if you provide details or a photo of the wiring in the source box we can provide a wiring diagram.


1

Call a friend and have them come help you. Tell them to bring a cell phone. They will go from room to room with you on the phone, floor to floor as you switch off each breaker one by one. When the power goes off in the room they are in, mark on your electrical panel which breaker/fuse you pushed and Confirm what room your friend is in. No matter the size ...


0

Switches generate small, momentary arcs as part of their normal operation; AFCIs are designed to recognize and ignore these momentary arcs. However, holding the switch between positions (or taking a while to transition between positions) can lead to the arc sustaining itself, which damages the switch contacts and also causes the AFCI to trip because it sees ...


0

Unfortunately, you'd have to completely rewire the fixture -- the four-pin base is a sign that the fixture has an integral fluorescent ballast and starter, which provide the current limited, high-ish voltage needed for a fluorescent tube (irrespective of what shape it's twisted into) to operate.


0

We ran into this with our Kitchen requiring two GFCI Circuits, we were using GFCI Breakers vs Outlets. The Neutral needs to be dedicated to the GFcI device so it can detect the fault. We ended up running two 12/2 circuits instead of the 12/3.


1

Points one and two, I can't make a definitive answer but generally when a ground is not provided a GFCI provides acceptable protection. As for point 3, grounding issues is a major source of noise/static. If the item is not grounded the metal case around the device will be very ineffective in shielding the device from EM interference. Likewise, any EM ...


3

Column C First off you'll notice the text "Column C to be used in all cases except as otherwise permitted in Note 3.)", in the title of table 220.55. This makes it simple. You have 2 appliances, so follow that over in the table, and you'll see 11 in Column C. So there you go, you can just use 11 kW. Done. 11,000 W / 240 V = 45.8333 A So you'll need a 50 ...


2

Typically your electrical utility is only responsible for delivering service to the meter, everything after that belongs to the home owner. So it might be true that they did not detect any issues to the meter. A fault can occur in almost any place of your electrical systems, and depending how it's designed, even a seemingly small issue can have a large ...


1

I can find nowhere in the NEC that says that you must bury inter-electrode bonding jumpers. In fact, 250.64(B) explicitly allows for running grounding electrode conductors (such as inter-electrode bonding jumpers) along construction or otherwise aboveground when suitably protected against physical damage, etc.: Securing and Protection Against Physical ...


0

First things first: ignore the tap conductor rules in the NEC! You can't use them for receptacles anyway: 240.21(A) refers you to 210.19, which sadly is a bit confusing-looking as it refers to receptacles in two different places, only one of which refers to a notion of 'tap conductor', which furthermore isn't in the NEC's definitions section! But, ...


0

I suspect the subcontractors were trying to shirk the work they were called out to do -- the symptoms the power company technician identified (and you have been experiencing) are classic signs of an open neutral in the electrical service. This is something that the power company must fix -- it can lead to an electrical fire down the road.


1

As long as the circuits are 120V you can run a 3-waire cable. The only caveat is that you would then need to use a two-pole GFI breaker to protect the circuits. With two 2-wire circuits and single-pole GFI breaker (or devices) you can isolate the circuit for troubleshooting and maintenance.


4

This is a VERY misinterpreted section of the code, especially by lay people and home inspectors. Most homeowners and likewise simply think a water heater cannot be near a panel, for what reason I don't know. Basically, the panel can be anywhere in the 30" width working space. There is no mention of center of the panel or otherwise. Meaning, the panel can ...


0

Yes, a faulty dimmer. But only faulty by manufacture, not operation: certain components within the dimmer circuit will vibrate, at 60Hz and 120Hz (or 50/100Hz if that's your mains frequency). Because of this, manufacturers glue everything down, a process called 'potting', to the point where no components could ever be removed. Nobody's going to bother trying ...


2

First off. The only way to provide proper "grounding", is to install a grounding conductor from the panel to each outlet. Providing AFCI and GFCI protection to the circuits is helpful, but these devices will not provide "grounding". If you switch from 2-prong receptacles to 3-prong on these circuits, you should not connect anything to the grounding screw ...


0

Most likely a faulty dimmer if one buzzes and the other doesn't. Are the bulbs on both circuits the same type? Make sure the bulbs are designed to be dimable. (not CFL's)


2

In most modern fixtures that have multiple lamps, the wires are preconfigured going into the hood so that there is only one black (hot), one white (neutral) and one green or bare (ground) wire coming from the fixture to be attached to the wires in the box. If there are separate wires for the three lamps, all three black wires should be twisted together and ...


0

This usually means that the transformer either is not large enough or not compatible with your LED bulbs. It could also be a problematic bulb or socket, so before replacing the transformer, try the bulbs in different sockets and see if its still always adding the 4th bulb in the same location that causes the issue. If its always the same bulb, regardless ...


1

I'd recommend option 1 or 3 -- AFCI receptacles are much more limited in their functionality than CAFCI breakers are, due to the receptacle being further downstream in the circuit. Also, not all installations conform to the requirements for installing AFCI receptaclesEDIT: the Code I quoted is for new installs only, 210.12(B)(2) permits receptacle AFCIs in ...


4

I am going to guess that the outlet that the lamp is plugged into is the same one each time you have tried this. You may want to try plugging the lamp into one of the other four outlets. If the lamp does not come on then read on here. It is clear that the lamp outlet is wired in a daisy chain manner such that power feed comes first to the lamp outlet and ...


0

On mine, the two-story house makes drops impossible. I ran a cable outside from the downstairs point (just 1 place) up the wall to the soffit, in the attic all the way across the house, and then into the router closet. The CAT5e lasted years exposed outside with no problems. For fishing and drilling within the space between the floors, I've not even found ...


1

The voltage rating of 300V is irrelevant because you'll only be using a 120V power system. All it means is that the original plug is capable of being used with higher-voltage systems (240V plus some room to spare) even though the heater it was attached to probably isn't. As you said, 1500 W at 120V is 12.5 amps, so a plug rated for 15A should be fine. Note ...


3

I wouldn't expect it to be anything more than a resistive element so it shouldn't be polarized... but the maintenance manual is almost certainly available on the weB, free or for a small fee, so I'd suggest you check that.


0

Yes this is normal. There are two hots at 120v. Hot to hot gives you 240v but hot to neutral or ground gives you 120v.


1

Assuming the GFI isn't defective, there are three common things that can keep it from resetting: There is no power to the outlet. The GFI is wired in backwards: the wires coming from the breaker box are connected to the "load" side of the outlet rather than the "line" side. There is a ground fault somewhere in the circuit the GFI is protecting. Given ...


0

It's possible that you are detecting residual voltage from the neutral through the lamps at one switch (in the order of 50V often), you can use a multimeter in voltage mode and see how much voltage you actually detect. Or take out the bulbs from the fixtures and check again. Other wise you can (with the breaker off) connect 2 wires at one switch then check ...


0

I reset breaker and tried to reset and still didn't work. I don't understand why all but one quit working. Is it possible that they are all connected together?


1

Use the solid state to drive a relay (that actually switches the baseboard) that is rated for the amps.


7

By all common sense you should not try to splice an appliance cord to make it longer. What you should really do is to open up the appliance and remove the remaining chewed off chunck of cord. This may require you to free any type of cord retainers and / or strain reliefs. Then a new cord of ratings same as the original should be installed in place of the ...


0

You have a relay in your light box, hence the yellow wire. It is mounted through a knockout in the box. Your switches are connected to the relay outside the box in attic space. The relay coil is 12 or 24V. It's an automated house. Check your voltage again at switches: you should have 12VAC or 24VAC.


0

I assume you want two switches, one for the fan, another for the light. From your description this would not be possible with the wiring you have. You are one wire short. In order to control both light and fan separately you need an individual hot wire going from switch to fan, and from other switch to light. I would recommend going with a fan with a remote. ...


0

In the US, switching a breaker on will sometimes trip a GFCI for no apparent reason. Reset the GFCI with the breaker on, and if it trips with current to it, it may be bad, OR you might have a ground fault. These devices aren't designed to last more than 5 to 10 years. If considering replacement, have an electrician check the wiring first. I've seen many GFCI ...


0

A white wire connected to a hot can be seen on switched hots. A good electrician will often add a piece of black tape to indicate this, but that often doesn't happen. When connecting wires to screws on outlets, you only want one wire per screw. If you need to attach multiple wires and don't have enough locations to screw them on, then pig tail them together ...


1

The switch must be in a listed and labeled enclosure, or the switch itself must have a built-in enclosure. The switch should also be rated for the voltage, and current, to which it will be subjected. You'll also want to make sure the switch is attached in such a way, that normal use will not rip it from the enclosure. Pull chains can be subjected to a lot ...


3

If there's no permanent ladder or stairs leading to the attic, you may be able to simply lay the cable across the rafters. "Where this space is not accessible by permanent stairs or ladders, protection shall only be required within 1.8 m (6 ft) of the nearest edge of the scuttle hole or attic entrance.". National Electrical Code Chapter 3 ...



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