New answers tagged

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Does a receptacle have to supply the max current that it is rated for? Simple answer A receptacle, and the circuit supplying it, has to do only one or other of two things: Either safely provide the full rated current, continuously, at the full rated voltage (±10% †). Or safely trip an overcurrent protection device (a circuit breaker) and disconnect ...


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There is no requirement in the National Electrical Code for any particular receptacle configuration. If I want to wire my whole house with twist-lock receptacles there is no prohibition of that. There is no guarantee that the rating of the receptacle matches the rating of the circuit. It may be implied but not required. The code requires a minimum ...


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Does a receptacle have to supply the max current that it is rated for? The answer is usually no. A line of 20 amp outlets on a 20 amp circuit cannot all be expected to provide 20 amps—at the same time. Likewise, a 50 amp dryer or range outlet on a dedicated circuit may well have been installed for plug ("pigtail") compatibility—not because ...


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Short answer: Yes, in general it is safe to assume that an L5-30R will supply you up to 30A (nominal, 24A continuous) at ~120V. Give or take. If you're still reading... Suppose you come across a L5-30R (120V, 30A receptacle) somewhere. By spec, can you assume that there will be 30 amps at it? The ratings of these outlets tells you about the safety ...


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250V is the insulation rating of the L6-30 plug. It's the "never-exceed" voltage. Normally it's used for 240V single phase (delivered as split-phase). However in some locales, mainly NYC, they supply houses with two legs of 208V 3-phase wye. So it is 120V phase to neutral, and 208 phase to phase. There is no separate receptacle design for "208 2-leg", ...


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The outlet needs to be listed for the voltage being used. A 10-30r is listed for 125-250v 30Amp This outlet would require a minimum of #10 wires you could use a smaller breaker but that would be silly in my opinion because the cost of the wire and outlet are most of the cost of this outlet. The problem of using the wrong type of outlet comes up when another ...


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Even for a novice, I would suggest basic, inexpensive test equipment like a $20 Kill-a-Watt, sold on Amazon or Menards (there are also more featureful alternatives for a little more money). If you're blowing a lot of stuff, my first thought is you have high voltage. There's a specific thing to watch for: a lost neutral. American power is 240V with a ...


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The plug specs are the maximum ratings given for how the plug is meant to be used in any given application. So a plug speced as 120V/30A is not designed to be used in applications over 120V and not to be loaded over 30A. Now that said....those numbers do not directly have anything to do with the capabilities of the supply circuit or wiring. If the circuit ...


3

If you plug a device into an L5-30 receptacle, you can expect that the device can draw up to 30 amperes @ 120 volts. If you plug a device into an L6-30 receptacle, you can expect that the device can draw up to 30 amperes @ 240 volts.


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If all the breakers on every other row go out, you lost one of your phases. That's not as bad as losing a neutral, in which case each 120V leg can go as high as 240V, blowing stuff up and starting fires. All that to say, if it proves to be a wire connection problem, check your neutral too! If both breakers in a single row go out, you may have a burned up ...


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I figured it out after opening it up. The old switches the previous owner installed were actually upside down and the common terminal was in the wrong spot, so when I tired them up the same way the hot was only being properly fed by one switch and when that switch was off the other switch wouldnt work. Once I figured out that that was the problem it was an ...


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I recently came across a receptacle that had "single use" printed on the back near the wire holes, and there was no release mechanism. I had to cut the wires and use the screws on the side to reattach them.


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It's not enough to get any dimmer. You need a dimmer that is compatible with your LED system. That's a hard find, and diy.se is not a shop-for-me site. We can help with how to navigate the limitations of the available tech. Very often these under-cabinet LED lights are 12 volts from a power supply. If so, that is the place to do the dimming - after the ...


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You need a fixture listed for wet locations: from the NEC. Bathtub and shower areas. Luminaries located within the actual outside dimension of the bathtub or shower to a height of 8' vertically from the top of the bathtub or threshold of the shower shall be marked for damp locations or for wet locations were subject to shower spray. NEC 410.10.D. Since in a ...


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From the 2014 NEC: 210.8 (A) Dwelling Units. All 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20-ampere receptacles installed in the locations specified in 210.8(A)(1) through (8) shall have ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for personnel. (1) Bathrooms There is no requirement in the code for bathroom lights or exhaust fans to be GFCI protected. ...


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I think the point here should be never take electrical advice from a General Contractor. Get your advice from an experienced electrician. There is absolutely no reason to replace all the wiring in the house. Upgrading or moving the service does not require a complete re-wire. Fire is about the only thing that requires a re-wire. If you want to keep the ...


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Yes. I fit steel junction boxes in places the old wires can reach. Then run EMT conduit between the panel and those boxes. No more than 3 circuits (MWBC counts as 1) in each conduit and use 3/4" conduit, for easy pulling and future expansion. NEC limits each conduit run to 9 conductors (4 circuits: grounds and MWBC neutrals do not count) unless you upsize ...


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Are you sure nothing else is plugged into that circuit? It may be just enough for the normal load, not enough when one more thing is turned on...


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It's definitely possible to have poor power quality, which can lead to shortened life of devices. It's possible for this to be caused by poor wiring in the building, though it's more commonly a problem with the distribution system. In areas where utilities are older, it's common for the distribution systems to be overloaded by higher consumer demand. ...


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From the 2014 NEC: 210.52 Dwelling Unit Receptacle Outlets. This section provides requirements for 125-volt, 15- and 20-ampere re-ceptacle outlets. The receptacles required by this section shall be in addition to any receptacle that is: (1) Part of a luminaire or appliance, or (2) Controlled by a wall switch in accordance with 210.70(A)(1), ...


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Yes, both sides of a door in habitable rooms for any wall space 24" or greater, except closets. Hallways only require one no matter how many doors, or wall breaks. 66" max height if memory serves correct for it to count as part of the wall outlets. Fixed cabinets do not count as wall space so not an issue if the outlet is accessible or not if inside a ...


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In my experience it's usually not the breaker, but it could be. This depends on where you live and a bunch of other factors. For example here in FL the heat in the summer could cause a breaker to become damaged in such a way that it constantly trips once tripped one time. That said your main goal is to safely identify the problem and replace the "broken" ...


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Your TV, sadly, has what is referred to as a susceptibility problem -- it's vulnerable to being confused by electromagnetic trash generated by other gizmos, like air pumps and desktop PCs. From the nature of the interfering devices, it sounds like the electromagnetic trash is being carried from your PC and air pump to your TV via the power lines. My ...


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While cabinets don't count as wallspace -- the intent of that Code requirement is to make it so there are sufficient outlets available so you don't have to string extension cords all over the place. Also, no, a light switch doesn't count, as a) you can't plug things into one and b) switch loops didn't have a neutral until extremely recently.


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No problem. As long as you install a double pole breaker, make the white wire an ungrounded conductor (including marking as you describe), and change all the receptacles and devices to 240 volt devices.


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A fault like this could be anywhere in the circuit. In order to diagnose the cause, you will need to isolate the problem. Find out what is hooked to the circuit and unplug everything that is on it. You should also set all of the light switches to the off position. Once all of the loads are taken off the system, try resetting the breaker. If it resets, then ...


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I have found several times when this happened a light bulb element shorted causing the breaker to trip. It is rare but happens and a good place to look if no other changes to the circuit have been made. Another possibility is a bad ballast in a compact florescent lamp. Breakers rarely go bad.


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It could be a bad breaker, or a problem with the wiring that the breaker is protecting you from. You should contact a local licensed electrician, to determine which it is.


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Shared neutrals could cause this. If the two circuits are both in a box together somewhere, and the neutrals from the two circuits are tied together, this could cause this problem. It's common practice for DIYers (and some "professionals") to simply connect all the neutrals in a box together. If there are two circuits present in the box, simply connecting ...


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We've seen the "one second" thing before. The issue was an electronic switch (dimmer, motion sensor, etc.) which used a 2-wire installation - it's designed to work in a traditional "switch loop" where it has no access to neutral. It sits in series with the light bulb. When off, it exploits the fact that incandescent bulbs have very low impedance when ...


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I'd start by getting a Kill-a-Watt power monitor so you can measure it rather than guessing. You need to know how much current everything is drawing for real, and whether voltage is sagging, which would indicate too-thin or too-long wire. Here's what won't work. Surge suppressors. They limit voltage surges, not current surges. A line-interactive UPS ...


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You can cap the wires, and cover the box with a blank faceplate. There's no problem with that, as long as the twist-on wire connectors are the correct size for a single wire.


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Line to neutral loads are loads that require a path for electricity to come back to its source. An outlet circuit (120 v line to neutral) in your house for example is a line to neutral load. It carries the unbalance provided by the "hot" wire back to the panel so it can provide electricity continuously to whatever needs it. Your oven circuit (240 v line to ...


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Assuming you are in the US, a quick way to tell if a switch is a three-way is that it will not have the words "off" or "on" on it; threeway switches can be mounted in either direction.


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This is called "voltage sag". Short of sticking all sensitive equipment on a UPS, there isn't a lot you can do to combat it, particularly on the printer side. One thing you could try is to put a surge protector between the printer and sensitive systems. Some surge protectors may be able to suppress voltage sag, particularly the ones advertising as "line ...


0

The problem is that some laser printers try to fast start their fuser by allowing maximum power on start up. This makes the printer ready faster but induces a high "inrush" current which can be at least 20 amps and sometimes as much as 40 amps momentarily. Do not use a UPS on a laser printer. UPS's are for computers. Your printer instructions should ...


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That is a feature of laser printers - they work by using heat to fuse plastic toner onto paper. That usually means a periodic very high current draw. I think your main choices include Replace the laser with an inkjet Try a borrowed different laser printer Buy a very small inexpensive UPS for the computer and monitors (not for the laser printer). Some ...


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You can always use larger size wire, however, you may run into a few problems doing so. Terminal size The fist problem you'll have, is that the 6 AWG wire cannot be directly terminated at the new 20 ampere breaker. 20 ampere breakers tend to only accept 14 AWG to 8 AWG wire, though this may vary a bit by brand. To solve this, you're going to have to use ...


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The only way to know for sure if an upgrade is required, is to do a load calculation on the building. For this you'll need to know the electrical requirements of all the major electrical equipment (A/C, Heat, hot water, range, dryer, etc), and the square footage of the building. In my opinion, any home that's all electric, should probably have at least 200 ...


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Incandescent bulbs and halogen bulbs will work with any dimmer, and since you have a 700W dimmer, it is probably not intended for high efficiency LEDs or fluorescents... it sounds like a more simple model. All dimmers warm up when the lights are on; as a dimmer becomes warmer, resistance increases; that is a pretty universal property of all materials (that ...


1

The best solution you can arrange for 2-pair cables will be limited to 100 Mbits/second (or 10 times slower than the current most common standard wired ethernet speed.) Rather than looking for an adapter (dubious at best - any you find will likely be intended for telephone signals rather than data), I'd suggest just removing the RJ-11 jacks, and replacing ...


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So, it's a dirty little secret that most ethernet twisted pair wiring uses only 2 of the 4 pairs -- at least until recently. But, 4 pair is better for a lot of reasons -- like power over ethernet, redundancy in case of a broken wire, etc. Also, some old ethernet twisted pair used all four pairs. As to your question about an adapter -- dunno on that one. ...


2

Unfortunatly, a 20 amp breaker is not rated for #6 wire but you could pigtail the wire with #12. Not very pretty but actually legal by the code. You will then have to pigtail the receptacle with #12 also. Here is the problem, with 3 #6s and a pigtailed receptacle you would need at least 19.5 cubic inches of box space. Even a deep device box is only 18 ...


5

Yes, you can use that circuit to feed an outdoor outlet. However, there are several challenges which depend upon the choices you make. The easiest would be to reuse the yard end cutoff switchbox as a subpanel. That way it can easily accommodate #6 wire. If it was wired as 240 volts with a neutral (white wire besides red, black, and bare or green), it ...


6

Sure, you're always allowed to use oversize wire. You are designating the circuit 20A, you could use anything 12 gauge and up. This is absolutely fine, there is nothing wrong with this, in fact it's a good idea if it's a long run and copper is no object. You just have to contend with physical issues: the outlet (and possibly the breaker) is not listed to ...


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You would need to add a new wire from a new switch for the ceiling fan. If the (required) fan-rated box that will be installed is large enough you can simply leave the splice for the center light in that box just capped off.


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It's not the best idea but it is perfectly legal. Make sure your boxes are all rated to handle the capacity of all the #6 wire in it along with the receptacle(s). This is one of the reasons it is not the best idea, too many issues like box fill to take into account. It may be easier to splice the cable to a length of 12/2 inside and feed that to an outside ...


0

On 3-ways, the two gold terminals are the travelers. The one black by itself is a "hot" if you will. On one switch, this hot needs to be attached to power. The other will go to the light hot (black) wire. In your switch box, it looks like what was your neutral is not used. The circuit neutral is picked up in the light box. You need to get that neutral to ...


1

For some reason those plug-in receptacle testers show this result when there is an open neutral. This means the neutral conductor for the circuit is open or compromised somewhere. Most often it is a poor connection at a receptacle where the wires are back-stabbed, or stuck into the "quickwire" holes in the back. A quick test to do is to plug the tester ...


1

In a kitchen there are a minimum of 2 20 amp circuits required. Where I live a dedicated circuit is required for dishwashers, Most of the houses I have wired have 4 branch circuits or 5. I usually put the fridge on its own circuit, a microwave and the disposal on Thier own circuit, if there is a trash compactor the disposal and compactor. In some cases where ...



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