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2

After writing this long answer, here's a YouTube video. I'm not a professional, but I had to do a ton of research for a similar situation at my home, and here's some information that I hope will be helpful. First, it would be easier to break your question into parts, for clarity. I may be misunderstanding your question though. Q1: I don't have ...


0

The start up current of the heater probably is a bit over 20 amps (like 25) for up to a minute. Once it heats up, its load should be at 20.833 amps. For less than an hour, that is an acceptable load, but heating equipment wiring must be rated for continuous load according to the NEC. Either get a lower rated heater instead, or use a contactor. The ...


2

Without cutting drywall, you're going to need to buy a surface mount conduit. This is a rectangular metal tube through which you can run wires. Find an outlet into which you can tap the feed. Remove the outlet (power off! Wires Marked!) and mount a surface box extender. Re-mount the outlet on the extender, and tap your new wire into the feed in the box. ...


5

You need, at minimum, an interlock. That is a device which physically prevents the generator input and the main supply breaker from being on at the same time. Both can be off, but only one can be on. This is important for electrical line-worker safety. If you buy or feel the need of an autostart generator, you will need to move loads to a sub-panel and have ...


0

All dimmers buzz a little bit. They "chop up" the AC waveform, which creates mechanical vibration (buzzing) and electrical noise (EMI). Usually they are the most quiet when the lights are fully bright, and get louder as you dim the bulbs. Here is a good page that describes what is happening. A different dimmer may be quieter, although Leviton does make ...


0

Unless there is already wiring to allow the separation of the fan and light from the same switch (ie. L/F===|sw|==[+]--), then no - you will need to run a second [+] wire from the switch to the fan or light because the current circuit would look like L/F>---|sw|---[+]--. If the circuit is like my first pictorial, then yes - it's just a matter of finding ...


0

How many lights in total? The total wattage of all globes may exceed the switch/circuit rating? i.e. 6x 100W globes on a 400W dimmer or switch. You could possibly run two parallel sets to reduce the load, but this will decrease brightness. e.g. use (+)---switch<===:=:=:===>---(g) rather than (+)---switch---.-.-.-.-.-.---(g)


1

There are ceiling pull-chain switches sometimes used in the UK for bathroom lights, for historical reasons. I don't know how available they would be in the US. Since you're just switching a lamp, you could get a metal blank switchplate, drill a hole in it, and install a lamp- or fan-type pull-chain switch in the wall box.


3

Calculating the total wattage using Ohm's law is quite simple. Watts = Volts (V or E) * Current (A or I) Therefore Watts = 240 Volts * 20 Amperes = 4800 Watts However, if you live in the US (and possibly Canada has similar rules) and follow National Electrical Code, you're not quite done yet. 424.3(B) says that fixed electric space-heating equipment ...


-3

In Canada and in the United States (If i am not mistaken) total wattage is (A x W) x 80%.This goes to say, a double pole bridged 20amp breaker would be consider 40AMP. So 40AMPS x 120(Or corresponding voltage) x 80% = 4800 X .80 = 3840 would be the maximum voltage. In order to find out how many fixtures you can put on that circuit, divide the total save ...


1

Start troubleshooting with any recent fixture, switch, or outlet work on that circuit. Then trace the problem circuit from the main box outward removing every junction faceplate and inspecting. Jiggle and twist connections while looking for issues. It may be resolved just by a few turns here and there.


0

This question really needs more detail as to what your expectations are. Firstly, AutoCAD is a drawing tool that has often been used for Electrical drafting, but Autodesk now have a product (AutoCAD Electrical) specifically for this. It is still based on the AutoCAD package and there are many alternatives produced purely for Electrical Drawing, eg. ePlan, ...


2

Your panel is a 12/24, so every space can have a tandem or even quad breaker. That's what 12 space, 24 circuit means. In the panel schedule you may even see a line or dotted line through the middle of each breaker space. A single 20A breaker can certainly have all that on it, but the question is should it? It all depends on what you will be running ...


2

I'm going to volunteer that yes, there is much more it than knowing AutoCAD.


0

You could put in a sub-panel (which can be greater than or equal to 30 Amps capacity; the load to it is ruled by the wire and the breaker in the main panel feeding it, not "what size it says it is") and breakers to feed branch circuits, if you need (or have use for) the full 30 amps. 30A 240V Dual === 40, 50 or 60 A Sub --- perhaps 4 120V singles - 20A for ...


1

As long as the existing cable has a grounding conductor what you propose is absolutely fine, although you must replace the breaker with the proper two-pole 20A breaker. Although not required I would definitely place a label on the wire in the panel stating it is to be used for a 20A circuit maximum. I would place the 10/3 in a box and branch off with two ...


1

If the dimmer itself is buzzing my suggestion is to replace the dimmer. I would only use a high quality dimmer like Lutron, Cooper, or a higher end Leviton. Also don't get a rotary dimmer. Many cheap rotary dimmers are low quality with little filtering.


3

If this receptacle you are referring to is serving the kitchen counter you CANNOT use that to feed a disposal. Kitchen counter circuits cannot be used to feed fixed appliances. You will need to run a new feed to the disposal, preferably a dedicated circuit from the panel.


-3

can I branch out from this with smaller gauge wire e.g. 12-2 or 12-3 for outlets and a sink with a disposal for my new kitchen island? Not as it is currently configured because the breaker will trip when more than 30A of current is being drawn, but all of that 30A might be going through a #12 wire, which is too much by far. However, if you replace the ...


3

The GFCI for the circuit might be in a bathroom. Check the GFCI's in the house as one might be feeding the kitchen (which should be on GFCI)


1

OK, first of all, plainly this is a mess. The fact that there is a white wire hooked up to a black wire without any recolouring of it alone says that (1) there's some amateurish stuff going on here, and (2) you cannot trust any of the white wires to actually be neutral until you prove that they are. So proceed cautiously, and take notes as you go. There ...


4

My understanding is that I need a 1 phase(household) to three phase converter to do this. Yes. Usually these are used if you need to control the speed, torque, or another aspect of the motor. If you just need a constant 1750 RPM with a max 1HP, then you can purchase a single phase AC motor that doesn't require a converter. If you need to control the ...


17

I'm sorry, but from the tone of your question, and the fact that you even suggest plugging this motor into a regular 15A receptacle tells me you are so far over your head your only valid option is to hire a pro to wire this. This is NOT a simple DIY job and you cannot simply ask questions to get every little detail out of an internet message board to do this ...


6

The NEC simply states "where supplied through a ground-fault circuit interrupter" in this instance, so you can achieve this either by a GFI receptacle, a faceless GFI device, or a GFI breaker. You cannot however use an AFCI breaker, unless it is one of the new (and rare) AFCI/GFCI breakers. Good luck finding one though. I find one Siemens on Amazon and ...


2

Yes, it is safe. NO, it is not what you should do. The proper fix for this is to find out why the GFI is tripping. It is doing it's job and you need to find out why.


1

No. The bare copper wire is the grounding conductor, and it should be connected to the circuits grounding conductor. If there is no grounded "neutral" conductor coming from the cooktop, you should cap the white wire off. The grounded "neutral" conductor is only used for 120 Volt or 120/240 Volt circuits, and is not required for straight 240 Volt circuits ...


0

It is safe to run with the outside outlet disconnected. Just cap the wires so they don't become a potential short hazard. But that said, my personal preference is to put a dedicated GFI outlet in each location. Get an outdoor rated GFI outlet for outside and instead of wiring it to the load of the bathrooms GFI, move it to the same terminals as line (if ...


0

I guess the first question would be if you have a engineered truss system or ceiling joists; they aren't the same thing (as I've learned). Is there livable area on top of the garage or an attic/loft? If they are just ceiling joists you can drill a hole right through the middle of the joists (don't cut out notches). I've done 3/4 inch holes with an auger ...


0

The device labeled "PS-802 ELWCO", is a low water cut-off. The "C" terminal there, is not the C you're looking for. I believe the white wire from the transformer, is what you'll want to connect your C wire to. I'm not 100% confident though, since I'm not that familiar with this system. You may be able to contact the manufacturer for confirmation.


2

It looks a bit of an unusual setup, but I'll hazard a guess that there is either a further light on the circuit either fed from one of the switches or the power from the circuit is fed in at a switch and feeds on from here to another light (or lights). (Obviously, you need to verify this, as we can't tell how it's wired from just one photograph). From left ...


0

Sounds like europe? Total Wattage divided by voltage = Amps or Volts x Amps = Watts. so 240V x 30A= 7200W. I would personally not hit that 7200 total watts and have the circuit totally loaded. so the wattage of the lamps is the determining factor as Niall said.


4

I assume you are in the USA. The heater is probably a pure 240V load with no need for the neutral (white) wire. you should simply cap the white wire with a wire nut and tuck it back into the electrical box.


0

What, if any work was done to the electrical system when you renovated and the problem started? In addition, what, if any work was done on the house in the immediate vicinity of the electrical service entrance? Do you happen to own a non-contact thermometer (or know someone you could borrow one from?) If this is a bad connection (and that's my guess), it ...


0

Another possibility not yet mentioned would be that some kinds of light switches will 99.9% interrupt current but still let through a tiny residual amount. This is particularly true of electronic dimmers that don't use a neutral connection (many need a tiny amount of power for their control circuitry) and for self-illuminated light switches. When using ...


0

Can you find the route of the existing 12/3 underground branch circuit cable? If so, you can expose the 12/3 cable in its trench and lay a 12/2 cable alongside it to carry the neutral and grounding conductors as per NEC 300.5(I): (I) Conductors of the Same Circuit. All conductors of the same circuit and, where used, the grounded conductor and all ...


0

It's tough to say for sure without seeing the setup and troubleshooting further but it could be a sign of a bad connection (corroded, loose, damaged, etc.). Does this occur only on some circuits, or the entire house? This will give you an idea of where the issue is - if its all circuits then its likely between your panel and service. Something to watch out ...


1

I would use a 6x6x4 junction box and mount the relay to the back with Tek (drill point) screws. This should give you plenty of room for wiring and terminations.


1

This is possible using standard electrical wiring devices! You will need (in addition to standard electrician's tools and supplies): Three three-way switches (switches 2, 3, and 4) A four-way switch such as a Leviton CSB4-15T or equivalent (linking for the sake of those who have never bumped into one, a good home improvement store should have one kicking ...


4

Another alternative would be to fur out the ceiling and install a drywall ceiling on top of your existing ceiling. This would give you an area to run new, concealed wiring. Another benefit to this is that you wouldn't need to scrape the existing ceiling which can be really messy (not to mention a lot of work), and you will need to mud/tape and paint ...


5

While that might work, I doubt your HOA would allow grooving the ceiling because the concrete is part of the common structure. Instead, install flat conduit. Or flatwire. Or maybe you might like a beam which could conceal a wire.


2

The maximum breaker size is determined by the wire size—not the type of outlet. It is okay to install a smaller rated breaker than the wire can carry, though that may be confusing to future owners. For example, 10 gauge copper normally has a 30 amp breaker. However, it is perfectly fine to use a 25, 20, 15, or even a 10 amp breaker on 10 gauge. ...


1

I don't know the details of that system, but that certainly is not "how they all work". The box outside should only be an intercom in the one you've shown us. If there was a keypad to unlock the door, that would only send key-press signals rather than connecting directly to the latch. The wire which operates the latch should NOT be exposed. Either you're ...


0

If I am inferring correctly what you are describing, it sounds like the "brains" of the system are installed outside with one screw access. That, of course, is an abysmal design. The only thing that should be outside accessible would be the wires to the call button and speaker - all other wiring should be inside-access only. If you are otherwise happy with ...


0

The system to which the question links lists this "Flush Mortice Lock Release 12v AC/DC - Fail Secure" under the heading *Related Items You May Need". If the lock is in a locked state, it remains locked upon interruption of power just as one would respect of a competently designed system component.


3

The loss of electrical power described in the question may be symptomatic of potentially serious issues that might result in fire and/or injurious or fatal electri shock. It needs prompt attention from a person competent to analyze and work on residential electrical systems. Hiring a licensed electrician is strongly recommended as a general recommendation. ...


0

Yes, however that's only half the problem. The other being that your lights are flickering. Somewhere, one or more of the 30 plus connections on that over-used circuit is bad, if you're lucky you just have one pissed-off breaker. If your lights still randomly flicker after you've swapped it out, I'd suspect an intermittent contact to ground. Perhaps a bad ...


2

Pretty simple question that seems to have gotten out of hand. I believe the OP was trying to fix or modify a work bench like this one, pictured. These would be the correct off-the-shelf parts... pretty legit if you ask me. Good luck finding a non-Decora GFCI for it, no wonder they needed a seprate GFCI.


0

I agree with the other comments and answers that call out that the components you've identified seem dodgy and that you could be using off-the-shelf parts. That said, I agree with the general idea of what you're trying to do and I have built a similar system in my shop; let me describe it for you. First off, the shop outlets and the shop lights are on ...


1

The OP is probably fine with Ben's answer, HOWEVER, you should only nut the wires together if you are sure that they were previously connected, E.g, had taped-off the same outlet (that still had its linking bar intact). Two blacks and two whites could mean there is multiple circuits present. If turning off one single pole breaker killed all the power in ...


2

'T'-bladed 20a receptacles must be on a 20a breaker. A 15a simplex outlet (where it only accepts a single plug) must be on a 15a breaker. Standard 15 and 20 amp duplex receptacles (slots for two cords) may be protected by either 15's or 20's. Is using 15 amp components on a 20 amp breaker against code? Provided it's not a simplex outlet (or as long as ...



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