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3

Yes, you can protect those outlets with a single GFCI per circuit and put three-prong outlets in the boxes. There will still be no ground wire and no actual grounding in those outlets. Technically, all un-grounded outlets that are protected with GFCI are supposed to be labeled "No Equipment Ground" (GFCI outlets will usually come with a little sheet of ...


3

Yes, by all means - larger than minimum wire is perfectly fine.


0

This can also be a sign that you bought a dimmer that is designed for incandescent bulbs, but you have it controlling CFL or LED bulbs. This can absolutely make it buzz. If the dimmer was not explicitly for CFL and LED bulbs and those are what you are running, then you need to get new dimmers that are explicitly for those bulbs.


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My Home's ground and neutral are one "Connected Together" so I had to remove all ground fault receptacles when I bought my house. They wouldn't work. The previous owners apparently lived with them not working.


1

You can use a metal detector, but find someone who knows how to use it. Different models can find wire down to 2-3 ft if used properly by an experienced person. Source: I use metal detectors.


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As one of the commenters pointed out, this is not 2-phase power (at least assuming something similar to standard U.S. residential 240V single-phase/split-phase service--what country are you in?). It's single-phase power. You get 240V between the poles on the smaller coil of the transformer outside your place. So you get 120V (half) from each pole to the ...


0

On a NEMA 14 that is correctly wired: H1-H2 should be 240VAC H1-N, H2-N, H1-G, H2-G should all be 120VAC N-G should be close to zero, but not exactly zero.


3

Alright. Your first problem is the "cheap and unmarked" part -- two prong appliances can be safe, but only if they are "double insulated" or Class II. Such an appliance will have a square-within-a-square symbol on its model number label, alongside any testing marks that may have been applied. Since this pump of yours lacks any independent equipment ...


1

Is this a duplex outlet, and if so are you using the same socket ? If the light works anywhere, the light works. The difference is something in the outlet. The good answer would be that the outlet is no longer tight enough to make good contact with the lamp plug. Try squeezing the pins on the plug of the lamp, and then putting it back in the washer ...


1

It's up to the AHJ to make the call. The term is used to express that some methods and materials offer better protection against physical damage, and that those methods and materials should be preferred when there's potential for greater than normal physical damage. I'd suspect you wouldn't encounter severe physical damage in residential settings often, ...


0

The easy out answer is 'whatever the AHJ says' In an attempt to be useful: Severe, as a modifier here would seem to require a severe environment. Anything that can be provisioned in a R3 Nema Enclosure is clearly not designed for a severe environment. Nema Enclosures 3S - requires that the external mechanism(s) remain operable when ice laden. 3X - ...


1

I don't know for certain but my interpretation of that language would be that "severe physical damage" would result from impacts or accidents caused by machinery, and "physical damage" would be an impact or accident involving people and objects only. For example, a forklift or pallet jack could easily crush even heavy-walled Rigid Metallic Conduit (the stuff ...


0

Crazy is a very relative term. So let's go with reasonable. Where do you live. This is what drives the answer. Visit PV Watts http://pvwatts.nrel.gov/ Plug-in the numbers you know, experiment with the direction, south and/or west will give you the best results, and see what you get. Below is my experience. I am in Maryland, and just hit a total of ...


2

You'll have to purchase a timer that is specifically designed to work as a 3-way switch. Or you'll have to rewire the other 3-way switch in such a way that it will no longer control anything. Since I can't see the wiring at the second switch, I'm guessing the wiring currently looks something like this... Which is sketchy, since there's no grounded ...


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You can draw a maximum of 40A from each leg. Watts is voltage times square of current in amps, iirc; you can use that to figure out how many amps each 1-leg device needs. If the total of that plus the two-leg 240V current for the stove is less than 40A, then technically this will work. In fact most stoves these days do this internally; control circuits and ...


1

I don't know about "Crazy" but there are a few issues you should consider: Cost This is obviously going to vary a lot depending on where you live and how big the yard is, but you're probably talking about tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars to cover a yard. Power Usage What are you going to do with all that power? Many electric companies in the US ...


0

I'm not sure that East side is the best orientation for panels, since South side gets the most of the sun during the day. Also if you place the on the ground you should think about shades; do any buildings, trees etc. cast shadow on your panels. Another thing you should keep in mind is damage risk. Someone could just for fun throw a rock during the night and ...


2

No. Nonmetallic sheathed cable is not allowed in wet locations. NEC considers outdoor conduit a wet location. You'll have to use THWN conductors, or other conductors/cables rated for wet locations. If you use THWN conductors, you'll be able to fit 7 conductors through 3/4" Schedule 80 PVC (Table C.9), or 9 conductors through 3/4" Schedule 40 PVC (Table ...


1

130V bulbs are also used in locations that are hard to access, like extremely high ceilings, because of the labor saved by not having to replace them as often.


1

Maybe. Depends how sensitive the boat lift is to supply voltage - #10 copper at 14 amps for 200 feet is about 5.8% drop (or 7 volts) - nearly double what is normally designed for. But given 120V at the head end, that's still 113 volts, and many items are perfectly happy with 110-125V. http://www.electrician2.com/calculators/vd_calculator.html Is the 3 ...


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Are you sure you want to run ethernet for your security camera's? an alternative is to run Coaxial cable with power. The cable is an integrated cable (one coaxial and one power) see RG59 Siamese cable Yes. this is not digital. But at least you have the increased reliability of Coax and reduced cost of the camera's. Remember your DVR can convert to ...


2

Something that meets or slightly exceeds the 35 in-lb rating, and matches the 24V spec (though you could check if your system is using AC or DC, and just get one to match your system rather than an AC/DC version.) I suppose the time should fall in the general range of this one's 80-110 seconds as well, so vents are not slamming open and closed, but I ...


1

Based on what you've shown, you should be able to wire it up like this... However, those red Wing-NutĀ® twist-on wire connectors are only rated for a maximum of 6 #14 conductors. So you'll have to split up the neutrals in to two groups, and connect the groups with a pigtail between them.


3

I would be a waste of time/money to replace outlets. It is very common to use 15amp outlets on 20amp wiring as the backplate of the outlet is usually rated for 20amp. And the problems you are describing is more than an outlet issue. For digital devices not working, you either have two issues: could be very dirty power (a lot of electrical static/noise ...


2

You can't replace 15A outlets with 20A outlets, even if the breakers are 20A, without first ensuring that the entire cable run is of appropriate gauge (and material) for 20A use. Otherwise you risk setting fire to your home. I would check the voltages at the outlets using a CAT-II rated multimeter. You could alternatively use something like a Kill-a-watt ...


1

I'm guessing your wiring looks something like this. So if you also draw the grounded (neutral) conductors, it looks something like this. Drawing it like this you can clearly see, if you connect the grounded (neutral) conductors in box 5 (B5) to the grounded (neutral) in box 1 (B1), you'll have a giant loop. It shouldn't cause any problems, ...


1

What you will want to do in your case, instead of nutting all the neutrals together (which is technically a 310.10(H) violation!), is keep the neutral from the breaker at B1 and going to B2 and the existing light fixture separate from the neutrals coming in from B4 and going out to the two recessed-light circuits -- in other words, B1 and B5's neutrals are ...


1

There may be other ways, but I'd use simple relay logic. Three separate relays, switched contacts wired in parallel, connected to power for damper and damper. Each relay has a coil that controls the relay - those are connected (individually - one relay coil per circuit) to the switched circuits. Any one circuit being on will open the damper. Two or three ...


6

Concurring mostly with Some Guy's answer here -- the reason why I take an aggressive tone in my other answers regarding FPE is because many of the OPs are coming to us because they want to do something to the breaker box, such as adding a new circuit or replacing a breaker that "died". Trouble Brews in the Panel I will start by linking my main source here, ...


0

All fed from one breaker... all neutrals together, all grounds together. That's how I was taught.


0

OP here, I had 2 electricians come look at the situation. 1st: kept repeating how it's against code, how the walls are spray foamed, oh my, you would have thought a kid was there with his hand in an open junction or something, the guy was just beside himself with it. He suggested replacing the wires from the panel, up the wall and across that floor. He went ...


3

New box (either add, or replace smaller with larger), pair of duplex, 4 outlets. Sure, you want not to do that, but it works, and always has worked. If you can handle it being 15 amp rather than 20 and a large pricetag, Legrand adorne makes what's claimed to be a 1-gang triplex pop-up outlet. Never seen one in person, and I'd wonder about long-term ...


3

Step zero - to reduce any nerves associated with digging, turn off the breaker supplying the shed at the house end. Step one - assume a straight line from the endpoints you can see, as the most likely path in many cases. Dig a little bit, carefully, along the conduit as it enters the ground, and see if the direction it points underground matches up. Step ...


0

In my professional experience with push in connectors tbe verdict is always the same... give it 5 to 10 years and the pressure plate holding the wire in loses it strength and lets the wires come loose. Next comes a bad connection at best. My advice would be to throw the butt connectors in the trash and use a wingnut instead


2

It's highly unlikely that the box itself is broken and causing this problem. What you should do next is remove everything from the box (label the wires first). Also remove each wire nut and put it back on, one at a time. In doing this, you may find a loose connection or wire nut. If not, then inspect each wire to make sure the plastic covering is intact. If ...


2

First, you can only connect one wire to a screw. If you need to connect multiple, then you create a pigtail by cutting a short piece of wire and attaching one end to the screw, and the other end is connected to the other wires with a wire nut. Second, you need to figure out which cable provides the power to the box. Most likely it is the cable without the ...


0

The answer to question 2 is that you are right to not feel comfortable about doing that. Get a short bit of wire, twist one end of it together with the other 3 wires together, and put the open end under the screw. Known as a 'pigtail' among electricians.


0

The problem is 'low voltage' lights on an incandescent/halogen dimmer. Here is information on dimmer types, and will help you find the right one http://www.lutron.com/en-US/Education-Training/Pages/LCE/DimmingBasics.aspx


0

As Reece notes, you may have to pull another wire but in fact they do make these. Combination Double Switch/GFCI Outlet: (Amazon)


0

Easier solution may be to buy a power conditioner and plug the av equipment into that. A "continuous coverage " UPS may accomplish the same thing. (Learned the value of these the hard way when equipment being used in a hotel kept resetting itself. Turned out the hotel's power dropped to 90V whenever someone used the copiers in the business center.)


0

The fist step is trace the circuit to the breaker. Find out all outlets suppied by that breaker. After turning off the breaker LOTO Check each wire to make sure they are securly landed to each outlet (make sure the screw(s) are tight no discoloration to the wire coating) After verfying each outlet in the circuit you will know if you have 14 or 18 guage ...


1

Same meter, then yes, you can, But -- A wise man will not use all the circuits in a new breaker box. The day you find the one you forgot about, there is no place for it to go. The prewired tail on the reliance manual boxes are just not designed to work the way you want. Each circuit has to run from the wire that is under the breaker, to the reliance box ...


0

A 6A (12v) adapter will probably be sufficient. If your design allows, you'll see less voltage drop (dimming as you get further from the power source) if you can use shorter segments.


2

It sounds like the winds knocked one leg of your service down in a way that kept your inverter from powering up the dead leg -- most inverters are line-interactive, and won't feed into a dead or partially dead system to avoid desynchronization problems (i.e. feeding AC of the wrong frequency to some devices may make them work improperly due to internal ...


1

You have what is known as a "multi-wire branch circuit", where two otherwise independent circuits share the same neutral return back to the electrical panel. Wiring the GFCIs in a naive manner won't help you here, because in a shared neutral situation, the GFCIs won't see the return currents coming back from the "other" hot wire, and will trip as they are ...


0

Your question is not long at all, much better too much information than not enough. If it were mine: Remove everything starting with the 125 amp breaker until you hit the disconnects on the HVAC stuff. 6/2 Romex - copper is good for 60 amps (NEC 240.4 (B) & 334.80 -60 degree) A couple of breakers, romex connectors and big staples Should be less ...


2

Unless I'm missing something in your explanation, using the 2/0 AL wire doesn't seem to be a problem, except that it's AL and the unit does not specify AL. What will probably be simpler than running all new wire is to just get AL-to-copper splice connectors. And in response to: if I run two separate circuits/lines, do I need to tie together to the (2) ...


0

Yes, stranded wire is okay; see Tester101's answer for more details. However, I'd like to add some advice: from experience, solid-wire is both easier and more reliable to pigtail, so if you have a choice, prefer the solid wire. Also, after seeing multiple correctly-sized and -screwed wirenuts gradually slide off of stranded wire, I now always wrap the wire ...


3

The real answer is "it depends on what else that circuit does". According to the NEC, if your outlet circuit goes to more than one bathroom, powering the fan/light from it is a violation. If it's only in that bathroom, you may be able to do this without violating code, but I'd recommend consulting a licensed electrician for advice, if nothing else.


1

Just pigtail the wires (hot and neutral both) before the GFCI, and don't feed the fan through the GFCI, and you'll be fine. Outlets in the bathroom need to be protected with a GFCI, but the lights and fan do not need to be. Having said that, if you really want to protect the fan with GFCI, just pigtail the wires (both hot and neutral) off the load side of ...



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