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4

You don't seem to have identified the type of connector you are asking about. There are rated and approved splice kits suitable for splicing NM cable inside the wall without a junction box. For example, look at this one: http://www.homedepot.com/p/Tyco-Electronics-Romex-Splice-Kit-2-Wire-1-Clam-CPGI-1116377-2/202204326. Note the strain relief on both ...


1

Sounds like there is indeed some sort of insulation problem along the line, causing both problems you describe. As Jodes said, call in a professional electrician to find the source of the problem before trying to fix anything. When you have some sort of 'leakage electricity' while connecting the ground, it will trip the rcd (that's the very reason for ...


0

This sounds like either the problems are unrelated, or have the same cause (lightning strike or other severe surge), or the short that caused the fire drew enough current to damage the house wiring. Two out of three of those suggest there's now potential for a much more serious fire. If you don't have the knowledge to isolate the problem, please hire ...


0

It sounds like the fire and plumbing work are unrelated. You should replace the old cable box and not plug in the burned one again! If you go to your circuit breaker box, you should be able to turn on the circuits that switched off due to the fire. If the breakers trip again, you might have a more serious electrical problem.


0

This is the procedure: (1) Have a REAL bricklaying-mason repair hole. Holes in brick are repaired with brick. Do not hire an idiot. It is harder to repair a brick wall than to build a brick wall. (2) Drill 3/4" hole through wall. (3) Put electrical conduit through wall. (4) Seal conduit with approved material to make completely air and water tight. (5) ...


0

That is a large hole, I would probably try to find or fabricate something like this: You could pack insulation between the inside and outside plates to stop drafts. Surface mount an exterior electrical box to the outside plate for your GFI receptacle. drill holes in the plates to pass conduit/wire through.


0

First off, you can simply cap off the wires safely and cover the box. The box must remain accessible though, meaning you can't bury it in the wall. Second, you CAN install a 50A receptacle on that line if it is for a welder.


2

Open hot just means that the wire that should be hot is not connected to the power supply. The neutral and ground are possibly still connected. This is a common way to switch receptacles by adding an extra (red) wire that goes through a switch. You should check continuity between the outgoing (switched hot) wire at the switch and the red wire (going to the ...


2

Does this all sound right and I should just not worry about it? If it is causing you concern, you could pay another electrician for a second opinion. I wouldn't bother but you may feel it worthwhile. do I need to start tearing down walls to figure out where the cut wire came from? If you must know where the wire leads to, that might eventually be ...


3

From your diagram it looks like the grounded (neutral) conductor connected to the light (that trips the GFCI), does not come from the GFCI device. It looks like the grounded (neutral) wire is coming from the feeder to the circuit, instead. Because of this, you'll have current flow through the GFCI device on the ungrounded (hot) conductor that does not ...


4

Yes, you're looking for lights with a high lumen output. Since LED/CFL bulbs don't convert heat to light, the wattage isn't directly proportional to the light output. As an extreme example, consider that a 2 watt laser is powerful enough to burn some materials, or blind you! What you'll likely find is that more expensive LED bulbs from lighting specialty ...


0

All electric circuits require 2 "sides" or "legs" of power regardless of voltage or polarity be it a 12 v DC circuit in a car or a 120 v AC wall outlet or a 220 v dryer outlet. 1 hot leg is 120 volts, 2 hot legs is 240 volts across both legs with a 120 volt circuit we only use 1 hot leg, so what is the 2nd leg going to be if not the other side of power , ...


6

No it is not safe. A 15 ampere rated receptacle should not be installed on a circuit protected by a 30 ampere breaker. You should not be plugging devices that draw more than 15 amperes, into a 15 ampere rated receptacle. The receptacle in your photo is a 20 ampere receptacle, so you shouldn't have a problem plugging in a 20 ampere device. They make ...


2

Unless there is something on the underside to prevent this, it would APPEAR that you should be able to drop the wires under the floor where they come down from above and turn - of course, that would require freeing up the wires so they can be re-pulled, or a mess of a junction box. And there's the fact that this was not what was done to make me question if ...


0

Wire up both pumps as if you was wiring up two single-pole light switches. Then instead of using the standard single pole switch, buy two Wemo WiFi light switches. When setting up these switches the Wemo app gives you the option of naming these switches along with several other options. If you only want to use one pump at a time then both pumps need to be on ...


0

240V thermostats (of 10A capacity or usually greater) are easily bought off the shelf - they are commonly used to control electric baseboard heat from a wall-mount box. You could mount one in a freestanding box if you want this "portable" as well, or you could wall-mount one and have it control a (labeled) outlet that the heater would plug into. While you ...


3

Not as long as you have at least one switched outlet. There's a difference between outlets and receptacles. In your case the switched outlet is the overhead lights you added. No other provisions are required.


0

Whole house surge protector will help protect against surges from entering the house (technically the electrical panel). An AFCI will protect a single circuit from any arcs detected on that circuit. Arcs are caused by bad electrical connections and can lead to a fire. Surges are spikes in the lines voltage and can cause equipment failure.


1

Yes. An Arc-Fault Circuit Interrupter (AFCI) is designed to detect arcing faults within a home, and interrupt power to prevent fires. A Combination Arc-Fault Circuit Interrupter (CAFCI) will detect both parallel and series arcs, while an AFCI will only detect parallel arcs A whole house surge protector is designed to divert surges coming from outside the ...


1

I managed to find a photo of the old motor and found an image of the replacement online. Hope this helps, thanks for all the help. Old and New motor


7

Not likely. The cabling it almost certainly secured with staples within the walls, ceilings, and floors. Which will make it impossible to use the existing wiring to fish the new cables.


1

There is NO neutral in a NEMA L6-?? circuit. That is a straight 240V circuit/receptacle. I have no idea what an "L609" is. There is no such NEMA number, but you CANNOT simply run a loose or separate neutral for this circuit. It MUST be run with the circuit conductors in the same cable or conduit/raceway. It must also be correctly sized based on the required ...


0

Maybe the dusk to dawn timer is set to come on at the same o'clock on a serendipitously-synchronized clock as the furnace thermostat clock. The light turns off in the morning (dawn) at about the time most digital set-back thermostats are set to increase temperature from the overnight set-back temperature (say, 'heat on' from setback 62 deg to 'at home' 69 ...


1

The light is designed to dissipate heat through the top of the housing. If you have the ability check to make sure the top of the housing is able to get airflow. CFL and LED lights will help your situation as they do not produce as much heat.


0

This was something the builder just did (I wouldn't even call it convenience/cost, for that matter). We start with 210.52(B)(1): (1) Receptacle Outlets Served. In the kitchen, pantry, breakfast room, dining room, or similar area of a dwelling unit, the two or more 20-ampere small-appliance branch circuits required by 210.11(C)(1) shall serve all ...


1

On the contrary, that outlet is probably the one that has the most direct connection to the breaker. The additional wire between that outlet and the others is what reduces the current that the vacuum cleaner draws just enough to keep the breaker from tripping.


1

You have two things going on here: The superintendent's repair may or may not be acceptable -- if he used a bare or green wire, or single conductor MC cable (unlikely), it can be considered OK in jurisdictions that have adopted the 2014 NEC (you'll have to check to see if the Canadians have caught up to this change). Do you have a tube-type TV? If so, you ...


0

I'm reasonably certain that this is not an acceptable repair method even though Canadian electrical code and US electrical code are not the same. I'd suggest complaining (or asking for them to check out this "repair" that was performed) to a higher authority (municipal inspector) to get the problem corrected, correctly and to applicable codes.


2

The only product that I know of that will do what you want is the Lutron Maestro Light/Fan control. This product consists of a switch and canopy module. The switch will digitally talk to the canopy module over the single ungrounded wire and control lights/fan separately. The kits are one switch and one module but the switch can talk to 4 modules at once.


0

You could install remote modules in each fixture, however, since there's only a single ungrounded conductor your options are limited. The easiest option might be to install the remote modules, and allow them to completely control each fixture. In this setup, the wall switch will turn everything on and off as before. But when the switch is on, the remotes ...


0

Caution is also indicated when the copper pipe is "interrupted" because copper pitting can then occur, depending on water quality, as a result of DC current. For example, the installation of a water filter or water softener without "bridging" across the installed equipment will result in copper pipe problems.....


1

You should wire it according to the manufacturers documentation.


0

The reason that wiring devices have grounding connections that accept only one wire is that otherwise, if two ground wires were connected to the device, then if someone later removed that wiring device and then re-applied power without wire-nutting the grounding conductors, there would be a break in the ground path for the downstream wiring but perhaps not ...


4

It is in fact a Wi-Fi Extender.


2

I'm guessing it is a different looking version of this: WiFi antenna


1

I would say that it is a covered sprinkler (fire extinguisher). It will react to temperature rise and start spraying water. The water jet will pop off the cover, which protects the sprinkler until it is needed.


1

The easiest-to-install solution to your issues is a length of 14/3 run in surface raceway and used as a switch loop. You'll want a circular raceway box at the light fixture, and a single gang raceway box at the switch, by the way. (Also note that the non-metallic raceway recommended by dfife's answer won't work here -- Legrand, for some reason, doesn't ...


0

This is likely due to vibration from the motor -- try a hard-service or "fan service" light bulb; LED replacement bulbs may also be a better choice than regular incandescent or CFL bulbs in this application.


0

If you have attic access you can drill into the wall cavities from above and fish cable down to the fixture and to a new switch. For the switch, you'd use an "old work" electrical box, like the ones with tabs that open up and clamp against the back of the sheetrock (or lathe and plaster) when you tighten them.


0

Good question. There's a couple of options you have (if I understand your question correctly): Tap into a power source (e.g., a receptacle), run the wire (typically behind the walls) to a switch, then run wire from the switch to the fixture. This is the standard approach (but may require an electrician). (See how-to-wire-it for examples of how to run the ...


2

No. While it might seem safe since each circuit is load-protected for it's gauge, you can have all kinds of problems. First: Someone might work on the panel in the future and move a breaker and reverse the phase on one of the two circuits. This would cause a 240v short circuit. Second: Any fault to ground will likely fault to only one of the two ...


1

No, nope, non, nyet, nein. Check the wire gauge and number of wires you have. You'll need to feed this from ONE 40 amp breaker, but you may be able to use the existing wire if it's of adequate size and number of conductors. Otherwise plan on upgrading the wire as well...


0

There is probably a switch just outside the bathroom. If this is rented accommodation your friend would have to ask the landlord's permission to get any changes made. There won't be an "actual plug" underneath the cover. That's just a fixed-wiring outlet called a fused connection unit (FCU). You might be able to add a pull-switch (cord to ...


2

This can be done using a multi-way fan/light controller system such as the Lutron Maestro series. You (or your electrician) will need a MA-LFQM package, which includes the master wall module and the canopy module, and two MA-ALFQ35 accessory controls, as well as normal wiring supplies (two and three conductor cable of the appropriate gauge, wire ...


2

This is fine as long as they can be joined end-to-end, are identified for through-wiring, or are listed and marked as a raceway, as per NEC 410.64. Just keep in mind that end-to-end joinable luminaires are limited to one branch circuit (that must feed one or more luminaire(s) in the set) in addition to the circuit that is feeding the remaining luminaire(s). ...


1

Yes, that should be perfectly fine - most fluorescent fixtures are built with an application like this in mind (where many can be joined end-to-end - not all of which will be on the same circuit in many cases.)


0

I'm betting that B1 provides power to the top outlet of a receptacle (probably on your kitchen counter) and B2 provides power to the bottom outlet. At some point that receptacle was changed (maybe you decided to change out the old looking receptacles and replace them with new snappy looking decora outlets?) Whoever changed them out didn't realize it was a ...


0

Everything at the furnace looks good. There seems to be an extra cable at the thermostat, which might be an old abandoned two wire thermostat cable. You'll also notice the C wire just hanging out, which should be either used or capped off. besides that, everything looks good at the thermostat too. I'd investigate where that abandoned cable goes. ...


1

Yes. The coil[s] can be replaced. I've done mine twice. Coil failure indicates inefficient venting, so it's worth looking at the the vents while doing the job.


1

Based on saying you can push up on the switch and the light turns back on, the switch sounds like it's faulty and needs to be replaced. This is a pretty easy DIY job. You need a new switch ($1-2 at any hardware store) and some basic tools, post back if you need help with the specifics. If you've never done any electrical work before, please read up first ...



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