New answers tagged

1

The inside workings of a window A/C are typically wet. The coils get tons of condensation, the fan in the back splashes the condensate water all over, it's fine there. If anything it is safer since it is being plugged into a GFCI protected receptacle where typically they are not. Just be careful of the load and whatever else is plugged into the same ...


2

If it's an old A/C unit, replace it with new. They are much more efficient (meaning: same BTU, much lower energy draw) and it'll pay for itself in energy savings. I just saw a no-brand cheapie that was 8000 BTU for 5 amps. The lower current draw means fewer or no breaker trips. Even an old A/C is unlikely to trip the breaker alone. Most likely it is ...


2

An indicator LED of that size takes about 30mW. Which means 0.03 watts or 1/33 of a watt). For most Americans, 1 watt of power run continuously costs $1 to $2 a year. So that indicator is costing you between 3 and 6 cents a year. While that's bad, it's the least of your problems. Your house is full of vampire loads which are much, Much, MUCH, ...


0

You could try replacing the breaker, as sometimes they do go bad. More likely, you're actually overloading the circuit. A common solution to this, is to run a dedicated circuit just for the air conditioner. If there's room in the panel, it's fairly straightforward to do. Install a new breaker in the panel (I recommend a 20 ampere single pole breaker). ...


1

The problem is more likely to be that you really are overloading the circuit...


5

First note -- a GaN green LED can provide acceptable brightness at sub-milliamp currents, so the amount of energy a status LED on a GFCI draws can easily be reduced to something truly insignificant. Second -- GFCIs themselves draw a small amount of current for the operating electronics. Older models draw a dozen mA or so, while newer ones need less than ...


8

Nothing in NEC section 410 prohibits the placement of a luminaire in or on a door or hatch. However, you'll want to use a flexible cord pigtail with strain reliefs between a fixed junction box and the movable door as NM cable is not designed for repeated bending. (Flexible cord is allowed here by 400.7(A)(9), BTW.)


0

Use a fan control (dimmer designed specifically for fans) on the power supply to the fan. Common AC electric motors have a high low impedance on starting because velocity is 0, This draws a large initial current to get the motion started and as velocity increases impedance drops increases and the current draw decreases. A dimmer will reduce the ...


2

The voltage needs to be the same, and the VA needs to be greater or equal to what you have now. If your transformer is 40VA and you replace with 60VA, that is fine. I would stay within parts intended for use in HVAC units. Electronics supply houses will happily sell you 24VAC transformers, but they may not be listed (certified) for HVAC use. Anyway, ...


2

No problem. Schedule 40 PVC conduit is suitable for direct burial, so there's no problem with that. As long as you're using schedule 40 PVC conduit, and not schedule 40 PVC DWV pipe. It may or may not be required by code, but it's good practice to install expansion fittings wherever the conduit enters/exits the ground. This allows the ground and conduit to ...


1

I use a "Kill-A-Watt" like this one here for plug-in devices. For hard-wired device you would have to connect an attachment plug to the device and plug it in to the Kill-A-Watt. You could also take amprobe and voltage readings of your equipment to verify it's power draw. Good luck!


-2

yeah ,don't worry about it . you're way *overthinking it . lighting fixtures at normal heigth won't normally be handled while standing on the ground. been working for years like that without incident fire or electrocution, right ?


2

Of course it's possible! We went to the moon nearly 50 years ago, merging 2 generators is simple. You will need to get yourself 2 sets of full-wave bridge rectifiers to turn the generator output into DC. And a rather large capacitor to smooth it out. Connect the combined output of the generators to either a large DC-AC inverter or a similarly large DC motor ...


0

Obviously, the phases would be out of sync (unless by some miracle you started the engines with perfect timing. So you need a kind of frequency changer or syncronizer or phase corrector. This apparatus us used for combining power from multiple generators (solar, wind, hydro, etc.) into a "smart" grid. I'm not aware of any hand-held, home-user type of ...


2

No way. The two generators won't generate the same voltage, and even more importantly will be out of phase with each other. The result will be they'll spend all their energy fighting each other. Hopefully this would throw a breaker, but if not it could easily cause a fire.


2

If the power enters at the first receptacle outlet, then you can wire it as follows: At the receptacle outlet box 14/2 feed into the receptacle outlet box. 14/3 between the receptacle outlet box and the other outlet box. Connect white wire from 14/2 feed to the silver screw on the receptacle, and the white wire from the 14/3 cable going to the other box. ...


1

[much better answer by Tester101. Will delete this answer tomorrow once OP has a chance to see redirection]


2

Look closely at that light switch. See the two switch blocks (one blank) and the almost-square translucent fringe around both of them? That lights up. That is a backlight designed to help you find it in the dark. You may have known this and forgot to mention it, or maybe it doesn't work for a particular reason. Here is how those switches are wired ...


2

Just use outlet box #1 as both a junction box & outlet box. Having enough room in the box shouldn't be a problem, but you can always get a deeper box if desired. Wire nut the supply to another 14/2 running to the switch. Then, you'll run a new 14/2 back to outlet box #1 to power the outlet. Finally, simply run another 14/2 from outlet #1 to outlet #2. ...


2

It's worse than tester101 says. Each circuit may not see half, there may be an imbalance of currents between the redundant paths. (Especially if one has a problem, such as being completely broken). Now how are the wires protected from overload? The hots have rather nice breakers on them, but the neutrals are not breaker protected! Nothing will detect an ...


2

If this is old armored cable, commonly reffered to as "BX". Then the armor was never considered an adequate grounding conductor (at least not that I'm aware of). A circuit wired with "BX" would be considered an ungrounded circuit, just like any other two wire circuit. If you want to add a ground, you'll have to install an NEC approved ground. If you just ...


1

Install BX cable into appropriate BX clamps - and done. While the code world is not happy with calling BX armor an adequate ground for new installs, it was considered fine when it was installed, and if the legacy cables are there, correct cable clamps correctly installed will serve as a ground connection.


1

If you have enough wire to have 6" from the back of the junction box where you tie in a junction box would be the easiest way. Most of the time the wires are tight. then there are 2 options. #1 to pull the wire down from the outlet to your box using the wire to pull a string or the new NM cable down to the box some times the easiest is to pull a string when ...


0

The reason the main disconnect is the only allowed place for connecting neutrals and grounds together is to basically keep the ground as clean as possible. Let's look at some basic properties of a residential single phase system: The main purpose of the neutral is to carry the unbalanced loads. The main purpose of the grounding system is to have a ...


1

Ground and neutral are not parallel neutrals. I know it looks that way because they're bonded in the main panel. But shift into a different way of thinking about the purposes of the 2 wires. Think of the ground solely as a safety shield. Let's try a few pairs of examples. The first is Code and the second bonds at the sub-panel also. The orange glow is ...


5

With a 120/240V single split-phase system, there are two possible outcomes. Separate legs If the branch circuits feeding the device are on separate legs of the service, then the tab will be creating a direct short-circuit between the legs. This will cause a high current through the circuits, which should trip one of the breakers fairly quickly. Same ...


5

Try using an 11b extension ring or a 1900 extension ring. Actually made to deepen a junction box, but should work for this application.


1

Doing this right now. Simple 50 amp sub feed to a shed. Two ungrounded , one grounded, one grounding conductors in 1" pvc. Ground rod at the shed. Simple, that's how you do it.


0

This wouldn't happen with "two way switches". The only time you would have voltage while the switch was off is if the switch has a pilot light or has a motion detector or electronic timer, etc. If the switch is powered at all, it could be pulling the small trickle of power it needs through the bulb circuit.


1

If you're getting a plain breaker trip, the usual reason is overcurrent. You have too much stuff on that circuit. From your comments, a GFCI outlet tripping is not your problem. You can get power monitor devices that will tell you what each device draws. The simplest is the Kill-a-Watt, which for about $20 and measures a single load. They make more ...


2

As long as the cable is in good condition, there's no problem with using it. However, using 8 AWG cable to feed general lighting, will be troublesome. You could use it to supply a panel, which in turn could be used to supply the lighting.


0

I'm assuming you are in the United States for this answer. A stove is normally on a dedicated circuit which means it alone is the only load wired to a particular circuit breaker. This means nothing else would have been affected if your stove's breaker tripped. The breaker for your stove will be larger than a normal 120V breaker in your panel so you would ...


5

I would use the cable to feed a small sub-panel. Then you can feed your new circuits from that. This gives you a lot of flexibility. Where was the hot tub? Where is this cable exactly?


4

In North America equipment grounding conductors (circuit grounds) can be much smaller than circuit conductors. In fact it's only the first few circuit sizes (up to 30A) that require the EGC to be the same size as the circuit conductors. In the US, grounding conductors are sized according to the NEC Table 250.122.


0

The connection to the ground rods is defective or the ground rods are too corroded to be of any use. The neutral coming in from the power company has voltage on it and is bonded to the ground wire in the house and at the same time the grounding is not effective. As Tyson says you need a different electrician. I would not trust your first electrician to ...


0

The fuse box appears to be superfluous -- standard 4-wire 120/240VAC ovens do not need this sort of rigging. It appears that some antiquated built-in ovens brought their control circuit hot out separately from the oven element hots, hence the fuse box.


4

I will all but guaranty you the wires are not aluminum, but tinned copper. Look at the cut ends of the conductors, not the stripped part. Tell us what you find.


0

Which are the wires coming from the control box from the dishwasher and which are coming from your breaker? I'd imagine the black & white are coming from the dishwasher. If that's the case (I may be wrong here) can't you just test the two white wires coming from your panel to see which is hot? Touch the tester to the copper head of each wire (be very ...


1

That looks like a standard appliance cord. Look closely at the cord and you will notice one conductor is ribbed. Follow it... It should lead to the neutral side of the plug and the white wire on the dishwasher. The ribbed side being neutral is an industry standard, if the plug is molded on to the cord it will follow this convention. You are correct about ...


5

Both can be a reason. If you overload an electric motor it will draw more than the rated value causing the breaker to trip. The second reason is excessive length of a small cord can cause a large voltage drop browning out the motor causing higher than normal current. A 15A breaker is only truly rated for 12A with a continuous load (more than 3 hours) or ...


0

Sounds like the power is trying to find a neutral and thats the residual you are getting. Dead leg. Does your switch interrupt the common(hot) and then feed the lights. I wired lights once interrupting the neutral instead and electricity will seek out a ground/neutral (air, back feed, etc...). Should take power from source(breaker box) to a junction box, at ...


2

If this truly was a split receptacle, where each receptacle was fed by a separate circuit. Then you'll have to either install two GFCI breakers/receptacles, or cap off one of the feeds. To my knowledge, there are no multi-circuit GFCI receptacle devices available on the market.


2

Transformers are pretty rugged and it's unlikely it would have burned up without some kind of burning insulation smell. If it has gone, the unit is not worth repairing. I would suspect the rocker switch has failed. There may also be an internal fuse of some kind. This thing looks like a Chinese-made device that may have dubious quality components. Even so, ...


0

Generally speaking, the grounding conductor may be required to carry (at least briefly) a fault current that's large enough to trip the breaker for the circuit(s) that it is protecting. This would imply that it needs to be the same size as the line wires. Nowadays, most jurisdictions require the use of GFCI/RCD or AFCI breakers, which are much more ...


5

So what happened? Well, the rule with all things electrical is, they work right up until they don't. With a small transformer like that, it is likely if it overloaded it could burn a wire in half thus failing open. Apparently, you have a basic voltage tester so you can test for continuity (or resistance) on the primary side (240v) of the transformer, ...


1

Trim kits for "can lights" (recessed lights) are sold separately. The box stores have them or you can find them online. Like this one here. For a shower/tub enclosure you need a trim kit rated for wet locations. It will have the gasket and springs like the old one. Take the old one to the store with you to make sure you get the right size. They come in 4, ...


-1

You can. But your total electrical may now be too much. It depends on your service capacity.


1

I would take a hard look at the receptacle wiring. It's possible you formerly had a NEMA 10 at that location (hot-hot-neutral) and someone hacked in a NEMA 14 improperly. Or you could have some other defect in the connection there. Or possibly back at the panel. It just needs a good general going-through - de-energize the circuit, take it all apart and ...


2

I would open up the receptacle box if possible to see what's going on, but the only way I can think that these readings would be plausible would be if the outlet neutral is not connected to a neutral conductor going back to the panel but is instead shorted to H1. That would produce the readings you've recorded. And if your old stove didn't use the neutral ...


2

Something is terribly, shockingly awry here. The only way you can get these measurements is if the line marked H1 and the line marked N are shorted together -- but normally, that'd trip the breaker. So, either you have an open neutral somewhere upstream of what's shorting H1 to N, or worse yet, you have a circuit breaker that is managing to not trip when ...



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