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0

The combination of a "bootleg ground" and reverse outlet polarity can cause this, as well as a hot-to-floating-"ground" short. The two can be distinguished using a non-contact detector and an outlet tester. The outlet tester will show a hot-to-floating-"ground" short with a normal neutral as an open ground wire (as there will be no potential across that ...


2

If you can remove the existing grounding wire from the grounding screw, then do that and connect your 4-prong's grounding wire to the screw. I initially misunderstood your explanation of the existing grounding wire. If this is a wire coming from inside the dryer, then you'll likely need to connect it to the neutral lug once you've connected to the ...


2

Tom, if the spotlight still lights up, it might be sufficient to just turn off the light switch leading to the fixture. That's assuming the power enters the switch box, and there's only a hot and neutral (and ground) going to the light fixture. Tape the light switch in the off position and tell everybody to leave it alone until you're done. ;-) Or you can ...


0

You need the c wire to power the wifi thermostat. Depending on your system you may have an extra wire not being used. Check with a multimeter to see if any other lines are feeding power, and not being switched. Ie in essence acting like a c wire. If you have another wire not being used connected it to the power of your furnace.


0

I just had a similar issue. Chances are a wire in the outlet is shorting another wire. You probably can't see it in that outlet because the short is from another outlet. Ie. Where the outlet is fed from. With a multimeter check the outlet and you will likely get strange voltages or as you said full line voltage on the ground. Check the voltage on the steel ...


0

Schemes like this are just a ripoff. Do you really think an insurance company is going to be able fix stuff in your home? You are just "talking to the hand". If the $100 or whatever it is for a new controller is that important to you, I would recommend calling Wayne Dalton's customer service at (800) 827-3667 and asking for a replacement. I will bet you ...


0

As an ex electrician I have real problems with this situation. 1) All devices on branch circuits say lights, radio etc plug in to wall receptacles rated at 15 Amps. 2) You say the circuit feeding these lights is 20 Amps. This does not provide the necessary protection for the light and receptacle. If the wiring IS 12 gauge the wiring would be ok but the ...


5

Anything with sensitive electronics is more susceptible to damage due to power surges. Receptacles don't have any electronics (unless they're GFCI or AFCI receptacles), and it's doubtful that a shop light has any either. If a surge is not large enough to trip the magnetic protection, or long enough to trip the thermal protection, then the breaker will not ...


0

Ceiling fan wiring? Here is a discussion with the same color wires. https://www.askmehelpdesk.com/advice/t-348809.html


0

From what you have described, I see no reason why you would not have adequate space in your sub panel. As far as wiring, you are correct in that you will have two hots (L1, L2), a ground, and no neutral. Without seeing the spec sheet for exact numbers, I can only suggest that you take the conservative approach and wire using a double-pole 30A breaker with ...


4

You are on the right track. As it comes from the store, the upper and lower sections of standard double outlets are connected by the small tab connecting the brass plates under the screws on either side. To separate those sections so that one half is constantly on and the other half is switched, break the tab on the hot side of the outlet. This is usually ...


0

Breakers and fuses are sized to limit the fault current that can flow. Each is sized to limit the current to that which the cable connected to it can safely carry. For example a 32A ring main circuit will protect a 2x 2.5mm2 cable ring circuit. Another example will be the 6A lighting circuits. These could be a single 1mm2 cable (though 1.5mm2 seems to be ...


1

Depends partly on the device. Some electric ranges/cooktops/driers have electronic controls which run on 120V even though they're controlling 240V; they get that 120V by connecting between one leg of the 240V supply and neutral. In that case, obviously, without neutral those controls don't run.


2

There is a distinct possibility that another another component of the AC unit has some how gone bad and is overloading or injecting bad signals back into the control board and in turn burning it out. It would take local diagnosis - along with a service schematic of the unit - to be able to isolate the faulty component. But your repeated replacement of the ...


1

The multimeter may be off trying to accurately measure an AC voltage that ends up looking like chopped AC cycles. There is a good possibility though that no load on a triac switch of the dimmer could look like an AC waveform of full voltage to the relatively high impedance of the multimeter input if the dimmer design has a resistor/capacitor snubber ...


0

If the support is as you illustrated, the weight is being held by screws through the support and vertically into the ceiling joist. The load is being held up by screws pointed upward. The strain is downward. All that is holding up the weight is the wood around the threads of two (or maybe four) screws. In general, wood screws do best when the load is shear ...


3

I can't be 100% without a relay part number or datasheet -- but most commonly, that type of specification would be 8A switching a resistive load (say a small heating element), and 3A switching an inductive load (say a fan motor). Solid-state inputs and relay coils generally don't draw enough current to be a problem.


-2

you definitely do not want to share neutrals from different circuits. This sets up a potential shock hazard if one circuit breaker is open and the other closed. If you assume one circuit is dead by opening the breaker the neutral on that circuit will immediately be energized if any appliance is using the second circuit. If you are doing work on the first ...


1

Standard electrical outlets in both Britain and South Africa supply 230V at 50Hz. There's a fair chance your dishwasher would adjust and work on 120V/60Hz power, too if you were bring it to someplace like the U.S. or Canada. That's not guaranteed, but manufacturers tend to like to sell their goods into more than one country. Regardless, electricity in ...


-1

As long as there is a live ground and earth cable in the wire then yes you can use a three pin plug


2

National Electrical Code says that you cannot connect conductors 1 AWG or smaller in parallel (310.10(H)). Since it's not likely that the conductors between your buildings are larger than 1AWG, you cannot do what you want. What you can do, is install a new larger double pole breaker in the main panel. Then install a new set (4 conductors) of larger ...


0

Appliances don't typically "consume more than they should", but their usage can effect their consumption. Just take your A/C as an example, if your neighbours house is set to 75, and yours 70 then you will consume more electricity all other things equal. Some big culprits to consider: Space heaters Fridge/freezer A/C Plasma TV's Furnace fans Pool pumps ...


0

Unfinished is fine as long as there are open studs you can strap the wire to. You could even use romex. But if your unfinished basement has cinder blocks then conduit either PVC or EMT would be the preferred method.


2

Based on NEC 320.12(1), I'd say no. National Electrical Code 2014 Chapter 3 Wiring Methods and Materials Article 320 Armored Cable: Type AC 320.12 Uses Not Permitted. Type AC cable shall not be used as follows: (1) Where subject to physical damage There have been proposals to change it to say "Where subject to excessive physical ...


1

Usually it's physically obvious - depending on how exposed the wiring is (typically in the basement, if at all) it can be easier or more difficult to be sure, but it will almost always be the one closest to the breaker box. In some cases the wire routing won't be so straightforward, but usually it is. I'm assuming you are capable of safely working with ...


0

I actually worked on a job pretty much identical to your situation. In each bathroom I put a GFCI to independently protect and rewired the "master gfci" as to independently protect too. I did this because the concept of having one "master GFCI" usually is a bad idea as they get covered up by refrigerators, shelves, or other things and the home owner has no ...


1

The primary consideration is not the static load, but the dynamic load from a heavy, rotating load. That's why there are electrical boxes specifically designed and designated by code for ceiling fan loads. See http://homerepair.about.com/od/electricalrepair/ss/elec_box_ltg.htm#step5


2

40 watts at 12 vac is about 4 amp which leaves plenty of headroom on the 12ga cable (which is normally rated for 20 amps (with heat loss and safety factors included). But what if your wire gets cut? Shorted? the worst case max current that a 300 watt transformer can put out (if it really is a 300 watt not a 310 watt or 315 watt) is 25 amps which is flirting ...


0

From the hardware store, get a hard-wired timer, two appliance cords (or one long appliance cord or an extension cord), an outlet, a switch, a box and cover for the outlet, a box and cover for the switch, and 4 wire clamps that fit the knockouts on the boxes. You'll also need a bit of spare 14 or 12 gauge electrical wire and some wire nuts. Figure out how ...


0

Follow @mjohns615 wiring instructions, then get a decorative ceiling box cover that will accommodate your receptacle of choice. This picture is "Decora" style hole for any number of different outlet types. http://www.kyleswitchplates.com/circular-ceiling-outlet-cover-plates/


0

The scope of such a project is actually possible for under $35-$50 but would require some knowledge on embedded operating systems and some circuit input/output, plus python computer programming skills. The project starts with what is called Raspberry PI and from there the fun begins. Raspberry PI Tutorial Other alternatives are available, some obsolete ...


0

Note that the ceiling fan electrical box will not be the same as a standard box for a receptacle. You will have to find a suitable faceplate that will adapt to a round/octagonal box, or you will have to change the box itself. Option 1 Break the tab on the hot side of the receptacle, and wire the two hot wires separately to each screw terminal on the ...


0

I had this problem. My house is a bit older and I started replacing bulbs in the basement as they burnt out. I pulled out incandescent bulbs and replaced them with LED bulbs. The dimmer started buzzing and I though "eh, its an old switch its probably going bad." I started with the dimmer switch, replaced it, still had the problem, replaced it a second ...


1

You have two issues: Strength of the hickey - Some hickeys are cast from cheap pot metal and would be sketchy. Some are steel but bent in the shape of a U with one open side, also problematic. Heavier cast iron ones with support on both sides wold probably be better. Strength of the crossbar - Also an issue. consider a heavier duty type or even a full ...


2

It sounds like a light switch with a built-in programmable timer would meet your needs. Here is an example of one that turns on at preset times for under $25: http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B004SOZHXY/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?qid=1435319450&sr=8-1&pi=AC_SY200_QL40&keywords=timer+switch&dpPl=1&dpID=31IbSTB9PVL&ref=plSrch. I have a similar ...


0

Sorry for the slow response, but when in the process of taking out the breakers to investigate the bus bar I figured out what was going on and it took me a few days to confirm it. The two bad breakers were in the same row of my sub panel, and it dawned on me that if one the lines from the main panel that feeds sub panel was bad, that could be causing my ...


0

Partially open a hot water spigot somewhere, then feel the pipes. The cold inlet should definitely feel cold after some water has run. While no water is running, heat is being transmitted in all directions.


2

There probably isn't anything you can buy that does this for a residential application, but it's done all the time in industrial plants, like this: As the drawing suggests, make good and sure that you're only using ONE phase. In other words, don't put the switch on one phase and the timer on the other, wire them together, and expect them to work. ...


0

A box, is a box, is a box. As long as the box is large enough, there's no problem.


7

That qualifies as a junction box. Provide you did everything else correct, (affixed the box to something a rafter, stud, etc., connected the box itself to the ground wire inside, covered any previously knocked-out knock-outs, etc.) then you're fine.


0

OEM builder grade anything is not the best. replace with a heavy duty switch and use the things on the side called screws. builder grade is meant to have a life time that exceeds the home warrantee but cheap enough so they feel that their profit margin was boosted enough so they con focus on other corners to cut. I know I installed thousands of them as a ...


0

Yes, you just have to buy the right dimmer. Here in the USA, most dimmers are compatible with 3-way circuits. I'm not sure if that's true in your area, so you'll have to verify when buying the dimmer. NOTE: In the USA we would call this type of circuit a 3-way, while other countries (yours included) refer to it as a 2-way circuit.


0

I expect this would be a good (and safer) option if wired up to a raspberry Pi or arduino or similar: https://www.sparkfun.com/products/11005


0

If replacing the bulbs did not help you might have a short in the fixture. By pass switch and turn on the breaker will confirm. But likely either a bad socket or transformer because the wrong dimmer was used. It is possible with today's modern low volt lights for the lights to have a electronic transformer instead of the traditional magnetic type. ...


2

It appears from the 45606 manual that this model is not designed for use with anything but incandescent loads: This dimmer switch is designed for use only with permanently installed incandescent lighting fixtures. Do not use it to control fluorescent lighting, transformer supplied lighting/appliances, motorized appliances or receptacles. The ...


1

See this little tab here? Turn the power to this box off at the circuit breaker, and verify it's off. Then grab the little tab with a pair of needle nose pliers, and bend it back and forth until it breaks off. Once you restore power, half of the receptacle will be controlled by the switch, while the other will be always on. A couple other notes about ...


-2

This must be a really old box because I see a 50 amp breaker and a 30 amp breaker I d and main breaker on the top and main breaker on the top. This box must be a from the late from the late sixties. or early seventies but since you're changing the box you'd be better off with a square D. 200 amp box just found this post Taylor I respond to it like a nation ...


3

To make one outlet switched and one outlet on all the time, you need to break off that little brass tab on the outlet in between the where the black and red wires are screwed in. To make both outlets switched, you need to disconnect and cap the red wire that is screwed into the outlet and not break off that brass tab. Don't mess with the tab on the neutral ...


1

Any electrician who looks at this would consider that subpanel 'maxed out' ... Not necessarily due to the technicalities of the code to squeeze another circuit or two in with complex tandems but because of the amount of wire packed into that small box and the extreme of things taken to extremes - meaning the multitude of tandem breakers. Generally tandems ...


2

as a HVAC technician. i found most failed capacitor issues was involved with blocked/dirty condensate coils, causing the compressor/fan to drew more amperage. so check first your condensate (outside unit) coil. if it is dirty unscrew the grill/fence around the unit and clean it with water. it is sometimes important to use detergents to wash it off.



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