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0

I came up with a solution so I'm going to to go ahead and post it in case anyone else should happen upon this and find it useful.I added the 1-in, 2-out, 4-position speed switch into the diagram. The switch works by taking one input and routing it thusly:[1: (off) | 2:A | 3:B | 4:A+B] and in this way controls speed by energizing either one part, 2 parts, or ...


2

An easy rule of thumb to remember is that a NEMA plug/outlet with both blades parallel is for 15A service ... if they are vertically oriented (as in normal residential), it is 120V service, if they are horizontal (in-line), it is 240V service. 20A service has the blades at right angles to one another ... 120V has the neutral blade horizontal and the hot ...


5

Some surge suppressors dump surges to the grounding conductor, some audio video equipment requires a grounding conductor, some "smart" devices trickle current to the grounding conductor, etc. It also notifies folks doing work in this box in the future, that they shouldn't expect to connect the grounding conductor. The label is also applied to all other ...


-2

No, you can not run your romex wiring in conduits. What your looking at in the code book is referring to thhn and other wiring, that while insulated with a single coat is not insulated with a second covering and bound to 2 or 3 other wires. Power produces heat and heat is the main problem here.


2

Pull out the wire that's in conduit, (look it over, but it's probably just fine) pull in that wire and a ground. It's darn near impossible to pull in another wire without pulling the whole bundle out and back in. It's fairly straightforward to pull the whole bundle out, add a wire and pull back in, unless the conduit is too small. Code-wise, (250.118) ...


0

The Compressor has 2 winding's, a Run winding and a Start winding, the Common terminal is the point at which both of the compressor winding's connect, thus the "Common" designation. For example,say you read 3 ohms resistance for your Run winding (Common to Run), and you read 5 ohms resistance for your Start winding (Common to Start). This means between the ...


2

I'd drop in a sub-panel and run circuits from there. Overload would blow the sub-panel breaker. Unlikely that a shop and dryer would be used simultaneously causing an overload. Same thinking using a dryer circuit to charge an EV.


2

As long as the second standard receptacle is correctly connected to the GFCI receptacle as well as properly labeled with the usual "GFCI Protected" sticker, it should be acceptable for code. The downside is it will look awkward and you should think more about if saving the small amount of extra money for an additional GFCI receptacle will be worth it.


3

As Ariser mentioned, what type of broke is broke? If you mean the light switch simply doesn't turn off and on any longer then you should be fine. Any Major electrical problems would either be kicking breakers, making the lights dim or you would smell foul burning plastic. I would however fix it ASAP to avoid even the chance of an electrical fire.


0

generators are very good on handling loads of up to .5 times started value. that's our policy here in Africa. if in doubt have a motor drive (schneider) to provide soft starting current.


0

The contractor is correct. The cord from the microwave will exit from the top of the unit, and should pass through the bottom of your cabinet, and plug into an outlet inside the upper cabinet. The microwave is designed to mount flush to the wall and the bottom of your cabinet, thus you would not be able to plug the oven into an outlet mounted on the wall ...


3

In my opinion, nearly all DIY light fixtures are hazards. However, since ceiling fixtures are rarely touched, they're not so bad. If you want to add a grounding conductor, it shouldn't be too difficult. First find a point on the fixture that will hidden within the canopy, and that is metallic. Figure out a way to attach a grounding wire to that point. ...


6

The dimming lights is caused by voltage dropping. This could definitely happen from others in your neighbourhood turning on large loads. Typically anywhere from a few houses to an entire block will share one transformer, so you are pretty much directly sharing the power with them. If this happens frequently, contact your utility company. They will be ...


2

Since it's only detecting it near the water dispenser, everything is most likely working properly. The water dispenser will likely have some electrical wiring near it to run motors or valves or what have you, and that is what it is picking up. They are probably run quite close to the surface of the frame. Your meter is designed to detect up to about 2 ...


3

What you have is called a split-buss panel. Code allows up to six "main" breakers or disconnects. The top six double-pole spaces in your panel are all main disconnects. One (spaces 9/11) is the "lighting main" which shuts off the bottom half of the panel. The lugs at the top of the panel are unfused lines coming from the meter. As a side note, the ...


2

Unless you have a disconnect next to the panel or meter, you do not have a main breaker. What I think you have is a main Lug split panel. If you look at circuit 9/11, fifth breaker from the top left side of the panel, that should shut down the lower part of the panel. Warning: You'll be working around live electrical wires during this procedure. If you ...


1

There are a few concerns: Neutral and Grounding First and foremost to do any of this would require a neutral conductor and a non current carrying conductor known as a ground/earth. Undersized Grounding Most double pole branch circuit grounds are only sized at #10. This is only good for up to 60 Amps according to the NEC. The total Amps gained with the ...


1

The code doesn't care if you say you're not going to use stuff at the same time, it assumes you will. I don't think it would be a code violation to have multiple outlets on a 240 volt circuit (though I could be wrong). The number of outlets is not restricted (at least not that I've seen), based on voltage. However, the conductors have to be sized for ...


0

A main breaker rated @ 100 Amps can have each pole itself carrying up to 100 Amps. The Illusion If both poles are drawing 100 Amps then the total Amps being consumed and passed through at the meter is 200 Amps. But a multimeter will read 100 Amps, not 200 Amps. The double pole breaker is not rated at 200 Amps because the double pole breaker is designed to ...


5

That does seem high for an unoccupied building, but not imposssible. It works out to about 5 amps drawn 24 hours a day. These are plenty of things that might be adding up. The biggest ones would be: Electric hot water. Even if you dont use it, it keeps getting reheated AC or electric heat, if they were left on or there is a faulty thermostat turning ...


1

@AndyMcKenna No, the way you have the switches wired will not work correctly. If you look at your new switches there should have 3 terminal screws. There should be two copper looking screw(traveler wires), setting across from one another, and one dark screw(power in and power to the fixture) at the bottom of the switch by itself. Warning: You'll be ...


1

Both conductors can carry the maximum current. However, since it can either be a 240V circuit or a 120/240V circuit, it can seem a bit confusing. At no time will you be able to draw more than the max current, but it is possible to have the maximum current on both conductors. In all cases, both ungrounded conductors will have to be rated to carry the maximum ...


-1

It's 50 amps. The only difference is that it's 50 amps at 240 volts, not 50 amps at 120 volts. But the amps rating on the breaker is the amps rating, period. In the old days you could take two single-pole breakers, install them side-by-side and tie the handles together (you'll still find some of those in service, but I'm pretty sure it's no longer approved ...


0

It sounds like you are talking about the multiple taps on the heater control transformer (blue wire, black wire, etc). These transformers have a primary (high voltage side) and and secondary (low voltage side). Arbitrarily hooking up the thermostat common to random wires such as the unused blue wire is not a good idea because unused wires are definitely ...


0

We had a home where the average electricity bill was $250.00 per month. Then we switched all the light bulbs to LED's and our first new Bill with LED's was $44.00 And that's no joke. But you have to switch them all out. These bulbs were 6W to 12 watts and the house cooled down as well, so the AC was used less. LED bulbs are 10% heat and 90% light. vs CFL's ...


5

This product by Hubbell is about the only thing I can think of that will provide the equivalent of a two-gang duplex (quad) receptacle on an octagon box. http://ecatalog.hubbell-wiring.com/press/pdfs/H4416R.pdf Amazon.com even has them: ...


1

Not that I'm aware of. National Electrical Code has capacity limits depending on the volume of the box. Standard practice would be to install a second box next to the first. If you happen to weld then you could: cut off a third from 2 octagonal 4 inch boxes (keep the 2 screw tabs in place), clamp the two cut boxes together and weld the joint. You now have an ...


1

The main breaker shows the total Amps allowable. It is usually outside by the meter or in the house inside the main panel. Things to Consider Under normal conditions an average home will consume between 20 - 30 amps continuously. Without physically testing with an Amp probe, there is no definite certainty of knowing what the average Amp load is. ...


2

If there's no current to the fixture or switch, then the fault is upstream. The fact that it was flickering indicates a failing connection, possibly arcing somewhere, which can be a fire hazard. You should check all the junctions on this circuit from the switch back to the breaker until you locate one with a good hot, neutral, and ground connection. And then ...


3

Go to the main breaker box and find the main breaker, or "Service Disconnect". It will be separated from the other breakers, and perhaps even in a different box. The number on the breaker, eg "100" is the max number of amps that your box is wired for (Of course, you would need to distribute your load appropriately. Have you looked into renting a large ...


2

You have 2 easy solutions. You can pull two breakers from the main panel, and relocate them to the sub. Or you can replace 4 breakers with half height breakers to make room and free up the connection to the new panel.


2

I'll tell you with 100% certainty that you CANNOT do this. Period. It is a serious code violation and safety issue to have the new 100A feeder be unfused.


-1

Warning: You'll be working around live electrical wires during this procedure. If you don't feel comfortable doing so, please contact a local licensed Electrician. Okay, going off of what you have, you need at least a 3/4in conduit back to the panel. You are going to need to pull a white and a green from the panel to the receptacle box and install a ...


1

You think you've found all the nails-through-wires, but there's one more. I once had a friend who's garage light switches suddenly started operating different lights, and I traced it to a 16p nail that a roofer had put through two separate runs of wire, one of which was a three-way switch send, and the other a regular single send. The nail shorted one leg ...


4

Turn off all the breakers, try them one at a time and see when the voltage returns, this should help to locate the problem area. Once you have the area found, turn on all the breakers, except the breaker to that area, and check it again. Now with the problem breaker/breakers off, go through the devices and check if any have a bad wire. I would start with ...


3

As suggested by Speedy Petey, I poked around further into the back of the wall box and it turns out there was in fact, some white wire. This gave me what I needed to match the diagrams on the Insteon sheet, the unit is now connected as diagrammed and functioning as intended.


5

Have you tried searching the site? The panel feeder size question has been answered many times. Here's one such example. Is you're planning to pull a cable, you'll use 3-3-3-5 USE cable with copper conductors (1-1-1-3 for aluminum). If you're pulling individual wires, you'll want four 3 AWG THWN wires (hot, hot, neutral, ground)(black, red, white, green) (1 ...


0

For powering a sub-panel through a conduit I'd use any stranded THHN cable. Code states you need to run 3 wires and a ground. Remember at the sub-panel the neutral and ground busses are separated.


2

On your switch that you bought the Black is the Line (Power coming in), the Red is the Load (Power to the Light), the White (which you do not have) is the Neutral and the bare copper wire is the ground. Insteon used to sale a 2-wire kit but the product is now unavailable. You are going to need to get neutral down to light switch(12/3 Romex) or look at ...


2

A characteristic called inductance makes some electrical devices behave like a flywheel; when current is flowing, it will want to keep flowing. Just as it takes torque to stop a flywheel, it takes voltage to stop current. Some kinds of motors have significant inductance; if current is flowing from hot, through the motor, to neutral when the switch is ...


0

I feel your pain. The simple truth is that having a degree in Electrical Engineering is actually a detriment in this case. The NEC, and permits and inspections are a part of civilization. In engineering speak, most of the NEC is orthogonal to electronics. The NEC prevents electrical anarchy. That's all it is for and that's what it does. Anarchy in ...


6

I'd use a 4x4 box with a raised cover. You can get the cover in a dual GFI configuration. You say a "GFI slave", I assume you just mean another receptacle on the load side. If so then you can get a cover with one GFI opening and one duplex opening: Just so you know, there is a near zero chance that that old AC cable can safely be used as a grounding ...


3

The normal rule in the USA is: You can work on your own home without an electrician's licence, but you can't hire yourself out to others. Permit requirements don't change. So sketch out what you want to do and take it down to your local building authority. The permit may take some time to get, but won't be expensive compared to your salary. Given that ...


1

There is no way to tell what to connect to. It depends on how they wired it. I think it is safe to assume you should connect to the single black since it is in that box by itself like that. And yes, you would connect to the white and green with the other two wires. The instructions are not sparse, they show what you need to connect to. They do not know or ...


3

Warning: You'll be working with live electrical wires during this procedure. If you don't feel comfortable doing so, please contact a local licensed Electrician. Set up your multimeter (or voltmeter) to measure volts AC. Very carefully remove the caps from the white wires, making sure the wires do not come into contact with anything. Turn the switch ...


1

If photo #4 is the place you want to install the new light than wire the white wire from the new light to the two white wires and the black wire from the light to the single black wire. First attach the ground from the new light.


0

I partially agree with the answer from WarLoki. I'm concerned though. You mentioned that when you initially removed the old fixture that the black wires were wire- nutted together and the two white wires were connected to the fixture wires. This could also mean that the fixture is controlled through the Neutral line. As mentioned , get yourself a Voltage ...


0

The fastest way to check is to use a volt meter and check between the white wire on the left and the (used to be) white wire on the right you should get 120v +- between the two. Now test between the white wire and the ground and see which one gives you 120v, that should be your switch leg, power to the fixture. With that out of the way, turn off the switch ...


-3

It's your house, do what you want. This isn't England/Soviet Russia/Germany (yet). You should see the "professional" electrical work in my house. Octopuses, bare wires on insulators, nails and romex. Every time I do anything I reduce the chance of a fire by 10%.


-3

I wouldn't call the building department. I'd call your neighbor. Find out what the locals do. You can do what you want in your own house. Something as simple as a couple lights and a switch should be done before you've finished reading this post.



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