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It just looks like your wires going down to your switch or mixed up. We in electrical have a saying "back on black". That way it's easier to see which wires go where on your light (as in there would be one black wire and one white wire waiting for you in the box to connect to your light). It looks like the wire that goes down to your switch is the cable in ...


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This is not strange at all. It's because you have a feed in, two feeds out (going to other things on the circuit), and one switch loop. The switch loop is not using a "neutral" as a live. It is simply using a white conductor as a feed to the switch, or at least it should. The way it is wired now is incorrect. The white of the switch loop should be ...


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I believe what Kris is saying is perhaps you should look at the back of the AC receptacle. Are the wires going to the plug all on the plug? If there are more than two blacks in a box we usually marrett them together with a pig tail that goes to you receptacle screws. Some people go the lazy route and poke each wire into the back of the plug, instead of ...


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Sounds like the circuit is daisy-chained. If the AC receptacle is damaged or has bad connections then a daisy-chained connection will cause the rest of the points along the circuit to not work. Just like a series circuit. It is indicative of a bad receptacle and/or connection tap which can damage the appliance and anything downstream.


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Guessing: Sounds like the control for that element is dead and needs to be replaced. Traditional electric ranges use a simple thermostatic timer mechanism to cycle the heating element on and off at varying speeds to control the heat output. The contacts can get stuck, or the timers heater may fail, leaving the element on continuously. It's faster and easier ...


1

The socket that you show has the wires attached by one of two methods. They may be riveted or electro welded to the internal socket contacts. Or more likely they are fitted into poke in spring retainer terminals. In either case I suggest that you simply cut off the existing wires at the socket and then re-strip the ends and attach to the new socket. ...


1

They are most likely "quick-wired", like the back-stab connections on the back of cheap receptacles. WITH THE CORD UNPLUGGED, look to see if there are small holes or slots next to where the wire is stuck in. Open a paper clip and insert it into those holes/slots. This should release the wires.


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Sounds like a mis-wired 3-way switch. I had one in my house when I moved in that did that. Have a look at my answer to this related question: How should I rewire a miswired 3-way switch?


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You're going to need to run new wire, which can be tricky. ASSUMPTION - There is a wire from the panel to the switchbox. If the supply goes directly to the fixture first, then this does not apply!!! Turn off power to the circuit. Remove the existing fixture. See if you can get the mounting box out. Feel along the wire and remove the staple attaching ...


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Any number of things. Most recessed light fixtures contain what is called a thermocouplin, at least that's what we call them in the field. This is supposed to cut off the light when the heat from the light exceeds the temperature rating of the fixture. They go bad. Sockets go bad Switches go bad Loose wire connections inside the fixture. Loose wire ...


1

Moving the main service to the garage is probably the most practical option if an easement for full underground is impossible. You will almost certainly need to change the feed wire between the garage and the house for that approach, but that's similar to what you would need to do for an underground feed anyway. Probably most practical to actually establish ...


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The "smaller gauge black and white" in the ceiling are your power feed in, while the "gray and white" are a switch loop to the switch. Connect the gray to the smaller gauge black, the white that goes with the gray to the fan black, and the fan white to the smaller gauge white; don't forget to mark the white that goes with the gray with a piece of black ...


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The pro answer is a circuit tracer, which has a transmitter you plug in or clip to the dead wires and uses them as a transmitting antenna, and a receiver which lets you follow that wire back thru the walls; when you find the place where the signal stops, you've found the break (or switch or whatever). It's the big brother of the "breaker finders" commonly ...


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You are not wired the same way as the picture in your instructions. I think the power comes in to the ceiling box, and the switch is a separate cable. To verify this, disconnect all of the wiring in the ceiling box and at the switch. Turn the breaker on and carefully check for voltage between the black and white wires. When you find the black and white pair ...


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That relay should be fine: AC watts = Power Factor x Volts x Amps. In this case we don't know the power factor, but 115 volts x 4.8 amps = 552 watts. Your unit probably draws somewhat less than that in reality. Does the AC unit mention power factor, or watts?


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@ 80% efficiency is just above 1/2 horsepower. The relay is just slightly too small in my opinion.


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Since you are pulling in conduit, you don't need a full blown box for this job. Simply use an appropriately sized, weatherproof conduit body (a Type C is what you want, by the way) made from the same material as your conduit. However, you will need to use the 314.28(A)(2) rule that the body must be no shorter than six times the distance from the entrance ...


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I recommend adding new circuits for the battery chargers. Keep that 30 amp 240v intact. You can use it to hook a generator to your house in case of long term power outage.


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Technically, the NEC does not specify the limit to how many receptacles are allowed on a circuit. A little common sense is at the discretion of the installer. You have to take the total ampacity of the primary side of the chargers.


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What can I do to strengthen the cable? Is there something I can do to make sure that the two cable parts stay together? You can use a product intended for the purpose. Note strain relief clamps at each end. As most prior answers have pointed out, generally it is better to replace the cable.


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Better idea: get panels with their own micro-inverters. Then you can add more panels at will in the future. Bonus: micro-inverters are more efficient than a central inverter and will last longer.


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This depends on exactly what equpiment you're using. My system was designed to have one inverter for each 2 panels, all synchronized to each other and to the power lines so I can do "net metering" rather than having to maintain any kind of local power storage. Other kits may be configured other ways. Talk with whoever is designing your installation, or if ...


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I'm a fan of using quad boxes on every 3rd stud (every 4 feet). My charging station is one of those long metal mountable power strips. I don't like having circuits on different legs next to each other. 220v potential is possible. (Like say stacked stereo components.) I also wire lights on separate circuits so my tool doesn't kill the lights if it pops a ...


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For a quick & temporary fix, tie a knot around the spliced portion. That will prevent there from being any tension on the splice. (You can also use a knot to take the strain off of multiple extension cords that are connected). But seriously, just replace the power cable.


5

The usual official blessed method here is to replace the whole cable. Odds are excellent that your mower manual says that. So, officially and for maximum safety, that is what you should do. If you are going to do otherwise, you need both a better repair method and to isolate the functions of the repair - part one being the strain relief or physical end to ...


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I would just replace the cable to the mower. It wouldn't be that difficult to do. The other option which is NOT recommended due to the fact that it's not considered safe and a proper repair would be to perhaps put a Heat Shrink Insulated Butt Splice in the cable. You can get them at electrical stores. They come in different sizes for different wire gauges. ...


2

When you reset the breaker were you sure to first go to the off and than on position? When a breaker trips it goes into the trip position which is centre on the handle. But to reset it, you need to go to move the handle to the off position and than the opposite way to the ON position. Sometimes people forget to go off first and just try to go from tripped to ...


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You can do what you want, as long as... The box remains accessible. The box is fitted with a proper cover. That being said, it may be more appropriate to make the splice in an existing box (assuming the box is large enough for the additional conductors).


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The short answer is that the breaker protects the wire (otherwise, heat and fire can result). You can put a 20A breaker on a circuit if all the wire on the circuit is #12. If any of the wire is #14 you can put a 15A breaker on it. If any of the wire in the circuit is smaller than #14, then you cannot put a 15A breaker on it.


8

Check with your utility to see if they have a program to bury your service line. My company (FPL) has a program where they will give you the conduit to bury along with instructions. Once everything is set up and meets their standards, they will bring the lines down the pole for you. There is a fee, of course. For FPL in my area, it would cost around $580 ...


5

NO! Regular couplings, those in the first image, are NOT pull points. Pull points are conduit bodies or boxes, or even those silly little elbows in the second image. My suggestion would be to install a conduit body at strategic locations. For your installation you really only need one. Conduit bodies:


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Locate the serviceable junction immediately upstream of nonfunctional outlet. Establish which wires go to defective socket. Switch off house mains and make safe. Disconnect these upstream wires at the junction. Disconnect downstream defective socket. Using a long length of bell wire, attach it to the disconnected wiring at upstream junction, and bring the ...


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Conduit it typically mounted and strapped so you can not readily separate the joints shown in the first picture. Pull points would mean a way to pull the with without separating the joints of the conduit themselves. Do it right the first time and make it easy on you or anyone else who has to work on it later.


1

There may be an in-ceiling connector as well as the connections which are certainly in the tape, but if you cannot pull a connector down by gently pulling on the wires, and if you cannot access the ceiling space, then the following will work. (1) BEST: Get somebody competent to assist or to do the job - you have less chance of dying that way. Otherwise: ...


4

Alright there are two options. 1.Either your light was fed power from the panel (or a plug etc...) first. OR The light switch box was fed power first and your light has two cables in it because it goes to another light after that one. You need to first figure out where your strait hot power is coming in from. I understand that you believe you have ...


2

It doesn't sound like a short. It happens after five minutes... each time. To me it also sounds like loose wiring or a bad breaker. I would turn the circuit off and than I would visually inspect the back of the receptacle first. Are the screws tight? Any burnt looking wires anywhere in the box? Than if that is good I would switch that breaker out for a ...


2

There is obviously something wrong, and I highly doubt it is the breaker. You can view the wiring in the panel by turning off the main breaker and unscrewing the cover plate. You will see something like this: As you can see, there is not much opportunity for a short, however, if the wires are touching somehow and burnt, then it could be a short. You could ...


0

What type of breaker do you have? I have experienced a similar issue with circuits protected by GFCI breakers. It could be bad wiring or it could be a light fixture that has a short of some type or it could just be the GFCI breaker. Id try everything prior to rewiring!


10

That device is a telephone line fuse and surge protector device. The fuses are in line with each of the two telephone line legs. Inside there will be a spark gap to shunt possible lightning on the line to the third center GND wire on the one side. These were common in the vintage days when most telephone service was delivered via open wires overhead on ...


0

In the most basic way it would depend how the wires were fed between the lights and the boxes. There are many combinations so we would need to see a diagram of were the wires go. So you would need to do a drawing and post it. If you do that somebody would be happy to draw ontop of it for you and connect your wires if it can be done. (Do not worry about ...


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Go looking for a circuit diagram for your exact model of fan (probably findable on the manufacturer's website) that will tell you how the old switch was connected, which will provide the info needed to connect the new switch. We've discussed this before, but the Android app makes searching for and linking to the previous answer somewhat annoying so I'll ...


1

The short answer is yes, some might be OK... the FPNs are separate from the actual code; they aren't enforceable. However, if the installation instructions prohibit installation below a receptacle, you're going to be considered in violation. I'd be surprised if any of these types of heaters allowed it... You can always get one of these.


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There are many varieties of three and four conductor cables that have unequal size conductors for this very reason: http://www.wireandcabletogo.com/Underground-Secondary-Distribution-Cable/


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If the fan is controlled by a 3-way switch, you'll have to replace either of the switches with another 3-way switch. Unless you eliminate one of the 3-way switches, you can't install a single pole switch. If you want to install a fan speed control switch in this scenario, you'll have to find one that can be wired as a 3-way switch (not sure if it exists).


0

I think every stud is too close. I would put in a double outlet every other stud, and put one outlet on each circuit. And if you want that many outlets, go ahead. Oh, and some jurisdictions let you schedule a pre-construction ("pre-con") inspection, where the inspector comes out, you tell them what you want to do, and they tell you what you are looking ...


1

The two hot legs are NOT out of phase! They are completely in-phase. No current flows through the neutral when the same load is applied to both legs of the hots because all of the current flows through the hots (only) from one end to the other across the entire length of the (power pole) transformer secondary winding. A difference current flows through the ...


5

A multiwire branch circuit would work well for this. You'll install a double pole 20 ampere breaker, or two 20 ampere breakers with the handles tied together. Then you'll pull 12/3 with ground cable from the panel, to the first box. And 12/3 with ground cable between each box. In the panel In the panel you'll connect the black conductor to one of the ...


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I am a big fan of a lot of plugs. I always think its a great idea. I understand that you are going to add 4 receptacle (plugs) to an existing 20A circuit. And 4 more plugs to another existing circuit. It would be nice to know how many devices or lights or big loads (table saw plugged into one of the plugs?). That way we can assess if your circuit would be ...


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Sure, it sounds overboard to me, but I don't know your needs or what you will be doing with all those outlets. Will you be using several power hungry tools at one time in your shop? If so, it makes sense to split up the outlets on multiple circuits. Are those power hungry tools located directly next to each other, where having the alternating pattern ...


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Just the hot. Just switch the hot.



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