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0

It's just worn out and not safe. Replace them with new ones they're likely cheaper by the box than individually at big box stores. Kill the breaker and verify it's dead before doing the work. Bending your plugs to get around a worn socket is at best a temporary solution and at worst a fire hazard. A lose connection will have a higher resistance which causes ...


0

If you disconnected the switch and left the wires hanging and the breaker turned the light on, that switch is connected to something else. Does this light have two switches aka 3 way switch? IOW does the suspect switch have 3 wires or two wires connected to it. (ignore the green wire which may be connected to the frame of the switch in this count) Is there a ...


1

That's not the problem. The zone valve is not working. Zone valves stick either in the open or closed positions when they go bad. In your case bc heat won't go off its stuck in the open position. Need to replace zone valve


0

DC voltage distribution over long distances is a pain. You have a few choices: 1) Pull big cables. Really big cables. Not really worth it. 2) Calculate the voltage drop for a reasonably-sized cable (say, 10 gauge), and sent 12V + the voltage drop at the start. This is a common approach for landscape lighting, though that commonly runs on AC, not on DC. You ...


0

GFCI breakers are way easier to deal with than the outlets. Replace all outlets with regular ones and stick a GFCI breaker in the panel.


7

3M Scotchlok's would work for this application. They too would require a trip to a store, but the nice part is you don't need to strip the wire as they are self-piercing. They can connect two or three wires, and are filled with a sealant to provide moisture resistance. They are typically used for Telco wiring, but support wire gauge from 26-19AWG.


0

As mentioned, crimp connectors are the way to go. If they will be used outdoors, I suggest either putting some dielectric grease inside the butt connectors or using some kind of sealing heatshrink tubing around the connector to help prevent corrosion.


4

I think @bib's suggestion of a crimp connector is the best way to go. If it was a 120V line outside, you should use a heat shrink crimp connector, but for low voltage this is optional (but still a good idea to prevent corrosion). The only other alternative I can think of that I'd consider is soldering the wires together, and sealing the connection in a ...


3

Consider crimp connectors While these are best used with a crimping tool, they can be set using a conventional or needlenose plier. Images and links are for illustration only, not an endorsement of goods or sources.


0

First choice: Call a licensed electrician. Second choice: Find all the outlets and lights which are affected by the breaker. Start with the one closest to the panel. Open them all up and visually inspect. If nothing is seen, turn on the breaker with everything opened up - does it still trip. Sometimes movement in the boxes will re-position wires and ...


2

Given that the gas range only uses electric for clock and ignition you will be fine (given 20A circuit). Being fine and passing inspection are two different things though. However the real question is what the oven and disposal require and the size of the circuit. In the manual for oven and disposal there should be information about circuit requirements. ...


-1

I say no. Reason #1: The NEC (I only have 2014 available to me) National Electric Code 2014 Edition Article 210 Branch Circuits III. Required Outlets 210.52 Dwelling Unit Receptacle Outlets (B) Small Appliances (2) No Other Outlets. The two or more small appliance branch circuits specified in 210.52(B)(1) shall have no ...


1

The way we installed them incredibly clean was the have the blinds mounted on the wall above the window alcove (not inside the cove as you did). The outlet is generally in line with where the blinds are and their "closed" state leaves them open enough to cover the outlets.


1

In the end, the best way to solve this was to request replacement Somfy motors with longer cords. The factory can supply them at any length, and they arrived within a week. I have now had them installed and there was no junction box needed, since there is no join in the cable behind the wall. There is now no visible cable whatsoever. I hope this is helpful ...


0

A ground wire needs to be connected to the ground bar in the breaker panel where the branch circuit originates. If you have only hot&neutral leaving the breaker panel, and then further on the circuit someone used Romex with ground to extend a circuit, you will need to run additional wire to ensure that the receptacle is truly grounded and not just wired ...


-2

I have seen where electricians have wired a light by putting the switch on the neutral. This way even if the breaker is off the live is still going all the way to the light. Of course here in the US it's only 110v and unlikely to throw you off the ladder!


1

You say "that room". Circuits are not nearly always designated to one room or area. Many, many times a room will have some devices on one circuit while others on another circuit. It is pretty rare that rooms are strictly wired so that one circuit distinctly feeds one room. Also, panel directories are not always extremely accurate. So something that says the ...


1

I am partial to Arlington BE box extenders for such applications. The 1-gang version is the BE-1. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00303FYHS/ref=pd_lpo_sbs_dp_ss_1?pf_rd_p=1944687542&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=B000GAQE9A&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=0XH4QSEWDXPFGKCN0ZEJ


0

Another option is simply to remove the existing box and install a new one at the correct depth. Most of the time, electrical boxes are secured with nails in the back, these are easy to cut through with a hack saw blade.


0

I am guessing that you removed an electric range and installed a gas range and wish to magically transform the 220V outlet into a 110V outlet for the new range? Only if you do the following: change out the breaker which feeds that circuit to one rated for the wire used or end termination -= in this case a 20 amp outlet - which would thus be 20 amp. breaker. ...


4

There are box extenders which can be screwed onto the existing box. They can be screwed directly on top of the old box. Just do a search for "electrical box extenders" and you will find plenty.


1

As long as the wire is sound and is joined old and new properly, i.e., not just twisted together but secured with a twist lock or crimp connector it meets code and is fine. Consider that the hot and neutral is already joined there so the ground connection does not degrade that circuit and is quite proper. That said - anytime you can replace old wiring with ...


0

Yes you can, but the proper thing to do would be to run a whole new cable from the panel to that first box. If you can do it with a ground wire it is not much harder or more expensive to do it right with a new cable.


1

What you have is NOT legal and really should be corrected. You CANNOT have general use lighting and receptacles on 30A circuits, even with #10 wire. You also do need a means of disconnect at a detached structure. You can use this feed to power a 30A-120/240V sub-panel using a tied two-pole 30A breaker in the main panel. This is only true if there are two ...


1

I can not help you with that particular tool. But a word of advice. Sometimes I have to put down my induction testor, or magnetic resonance testor and grab the radio. plug in radio to outlet in that room and turn on high. Turn off all breakers. turn them back on one at a time, listen. Do not stop if you hear the radio. Go through all the breakers. You ...


4

And here is why you check it before hand, even though you have turned off that room. People get into Junction boxes and re-wire - joining two separate circuits into one - in that case one circuit in the house can be fed from two breakers (as long as they are on the same phase). Always check with testor - and NOT JUST a proximity induction testor - but an ...


0

NO, NO, NO. The size of the breaker is matched to the size of the wire it is connected onto. I will assume that the two 30 amp breakers are in tandem and thus to two phases of your panel thus they represent 30 amps on two legs for a 220 V circuit. Thus - 30 amp max 220V or 60 Amps TOTAL amps at 110V (30 on each leg). Usually this type of setup would be run ...


1

Yes. Once you shut off the room fuse, no electricity will be going to that room. However it is important to test all connections before working on them so you are positive that they are not powered.


0

Perhaps you should try to get a job in a union shop as an apprentice. You will get hands on experience and good pay. I decided on this route and after a few years I took the test and received my RW "Residential Wiremen" card. I later landed a job as a maintenance electrician for the Boeing Co., which didn't require a JW card. The EE there was responsible for ...


1

Be careful,if the circuit had #10 wire it may have a 30 amp breaker. The wire size must be rated for the breaker. You cannot use 14 ga or 12 ga wire on a circuit equipped with a 30 amp breaker.


2

As long as you have the right configuration of conductors yes, you can use a wire bigger than necessary. Be sure to change the circuit breaker to match the circuit and receptacle required. Remember, you CANNOT have a "standard" 15 or 20 amp receptacle on a 30A breaker.


0

First off, what room is this in? If this is a bathroom what I am saying DOES NOT apply. OK, so you have a fan with two separate switches, and you want to convert this into a "dual" fan control? This is easy, just remove the two switches and wire the fan control according to the instructions. Then you can take the feed wire from the left over switch, and a ...


0

motors have a surge load upon starting which is higher than running load requirements. Use the rated amps of desired appliances or tools,that will be fine when matched with running wattage of the generator. remember Watts = Amps x Volts 5500/110 = 50 amps A couple of caveats though: older motors may not be as efficient as factory specs. Longer wire runs ...


1

If you take the running watts that should be enough. The starting watts should be taken into account by the 8250 number. This is assuming every connected load will not be starting at the exact same time.


1

If we eliminate "magic" as an option, the only thing that makes sense here is that you have not, in fact tracked all the wires properly (or at least they are not connected the way they should be.) If you disconnect and insulate the wires connected to the switch (circuit breaker off, of course) does the light still come on? If so, then you don't have two ...


-3

Fresh water is nowhere near as conductive as many people believe (salt water is). I used to have a plug for an outdoor sump pump that was frequently completely submerged. Pump ran fine, no one got electrocuted (including the cat), breaker never tripped. So, unless you plan to use the plug (meaning: insert and remove cords) during a major storm i wouldn't ...


19

Yes, there is a risk. Even a properly installed and protected electrical system can fail to protect you, either because of unforeseen situations or component failure. There are two types of flaps. One is watertight only when not in use and closed. This is probably what you have. This type of outlet is only meant to be used temporarily when exposure to ...


0

The problem was because the RPM of the new motor was different. So it burned out quickly. Make sure to use the same RPM motor apart from the HP and Amp of the motor. It really makes the difference. the AC guy now installed the same RPM motor and it works great.


4

The heat with such a miniscule load is not really an issue. I wouldn't worry so much about the temperature as I would about using NM cable to wire pumps (I assume circulators?), and securing them to water pipes (which is not allowed). A much more professional job would have been to use MC cable and secure them to the boiler housing or simply tie wrapping ...


0

The breaker with the green test button is an AFCI, or arc-fault, breaker, and it IS tripped. A carpet cleaner, much like a vacuum, can have a very "dirty" running motor. Meaning the brushes tend to spark a lot. This is a classic culprit in nuisance tripping AFCI breakers.


1

This is assumes we're talking a screw in bulb socket like a medium base A26. You can adapt the below for other socket types. The first thing to do is test the socket itself. Best way to do this is to use a multi-meter set to AC and an appropriate voltage setting for your supply voltage. Using the test leads, touch the bottom pin and the metal of the base ...


0

One problem with this approach is that LEDs are not incandescent bulbs. LEDs (stripped of the on-board driver circuit which normally handles that part) are "current mode" devices - that is, an LED driver closely controls the current through the LED, and the voltage may vary. When driving multiple LEDs, they either need to be in series and driven off a ...


1

Replace the wall sockets if at all possible. Until then, here's what I do. (I should mention I'm in the USA.) On the plug, either bend the prongs in/out, or apply some torque to them to make them slant. Either approach will help the prongs make stronger contact with the sockets. Try a little bending at first, then more until you're happy with the ...


0

The lamps will draw more than their labeling since there are losses converting AC to DC for the LED's. The previous poster's math is off but he is correct that the lower voltage means more losses over long distances. 200 watts would seem sufficient to run 10 - 14w lamps with added losses for rectification. I suspect the drivers are going bad from heat ...


1

The breaker on right side (Second to bottom) is tripped. I am not sure if the green is a sticker on it or a little notification window, but regardless, take note on how it is in the center position. This means that it has tripped. If you try to slide it to the left, it will just pop back to the center again. To reset the breaker, slide it to the right ...


4

The breaker on the bottom right (with the green tab on it) looks tripped. They will move to center position without doing much else. Turn it all the way off and then all the way back on. If that does not work: turn ALL your breakers all the way off and then all the way on to make sure all are reset. Then look for gfci receptacles and make sure to reset all ...


4

Those are breaker locks. You can hold the breaker in the on position or raise the bar and shut it off holding them in the off position. I can't tell if they are lockable to qualify as a legal lockout device for "maintenance disconnect" purposes. YES, the breaker WILL still trip even with the lock in place. Trip mechanisms are internal and will work without ...


4

Yes, it seems quite probable that there was an electric water heater at some point, and if the last two were gas, that circuit is probably unused. Leave it off, and check for anything not working; and/or follow the wires if visible, or look for a junction box near the water heater location that has a cable going in and no wire coming out.


8

Definitely replace as many as you can. Residential grade receptacles from that era are/were total junk. If you can, I would definitely get "spec-grade" receptacles. These are commercial duty devices that are MUCH better than resi grade stuff. Also, I agree, you will most likely have to install TR, or tamper-resistant, receptacles, which is not necessarily ...


7

Replace them. There's no way to adjust them. This is a common problem with receptacles, when they're worn they don't hold plugs as well. Depending on your location, you may be required to install tamper resistant receptacles in most living areas. GFCI receptacles may be required in some areas as well.



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