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1

That kind of flicker can kill your house. I'd get it fixed before proceeding with anything else. Loose connections and undersized wire = potential fire.


1

It's confusing when you say "The neutral wire on the switch is live/hot.", since typically there are no "neutral" wires connected to switches. Is it possible that the white wire from the cable is used as a switched "hot"? Wire color does not dictate purpose, how it's connected does. If this is not the case. You'll have to locate the point in the circuit ...


1

If the bond between top and bottom is broken on the neutral side as well, switch the neutral wires as well as the hot wires. If it's not broken then switching only the hot wires is adequate. When switching off the circuit breaker(s) beware of the possibility (not common but possible) that the top and bottom are on different breakers.


5

Yes, that's exactly what you should do. As a safety measure, while you've got the wiring exposed, double check that the hot (black and red) wires are connected to the brass-colored screw on the receptacle, the neutral (white) is connected to the silver-colored screw, and the ground is connected to the green screw.


1

The system is designed to dial out on a phone line to a central station or a police monitoring system. These alarms have built in warnings for a failure in the phone line. This is a safeguard so you know the system is not working properly. So long as the system is operational and cut off from the phone line, it will continue to beep. By removing parts of ...


0

It is fine to drill a hole in pavement to drive the rod. How do you attach clamps and wire if it is driven flush? My city inspector wanted to be able to see the manufacturer's stampings on the end of the rod to prove that I had not cut it off short (providing less than required soil contact), I was specifically required to leave several inches exposed.


-1

hammer or front part of the spayed is an approximately answer. In fact the exact answer according to the code of practise SANS 10142 state that it must be 500mm off from the floor.


0

There is no reason to provide accessibility to a supplementary grounding electrode and the code requires it to be at or below surface. The important point of the code is that the supplementary electrode be driven so that it has at least 8' of full contact with the ground. Excavating and backfilling are likely to reduce the effective contact.


0

The grounding electrode conductors can be used to allow installation of the grounding electrode sufficiently far from the structure to avoid the footings. There is little point in speculating in regard to the size and configuration of existing foundations. However an reasonable estimate might be made using excavations on one or more other areas of the ...


0

Since one main purpose of AFCI circuits is to detect arc faults in the in wall wiring (such as from hammering a nail into the wiring) as well as devices plugged into the wiring, the placement at the breaker is crucial. An AFCI receptacle would not detect an up-stream arc fault. Metal clad conduit protects the wiring from being penetrated by nails and ...


0

AFCI breakers generally have ground fault protection also, whereas I do not believe AFCI receptacles do. This is sometimes a problem on houses with "shared neutral" circuits (sometimes called Edison Circuits) as the ground fault protection logic will trip the breaker upon application of a load. There are (or have been, not sure bout 2014 NEC) restrictions ...


4

That beeping puts me in mind of the beeping you get from a smoke detector that has a low battery. Are you absolutely certain it's the fixture? If so, look for some kind of battery backup - maybe there's a night-light function, or a wireless remote or something? Or a built in smoke detector I suppose is a possibility. Anyway - find that and change the ...


1

NO. You CANNOT extend this kitchen receptacle circuit to feed lighting. Both Canada (I believe) and the US have restrictions on this. You must find a different source to feed this lighting load. If you are removing it altogether then I would say it is probably OK, but WHY are you removing it? There is a very real chance you are creating a different violation ...


2

Before you terminate and dead end the red wire in the box there a couple of things to consider. Since there are obviously two hots providing power to a split outlet (i.e. tab removed) it does NOT necessarily mean that half the outlet is switched. It could just be that two separate circuits supply power from two circuit breakers. The red wire may come from ...


1

The third insulated conductor is only called a "traveler" in the context of a three way switch (when two light switches control the same lights). In this context, the third conductor is just another hot. Usually, when two hots are connected to an outlet like that, the break-away tab is removed, and one outlet is always on while the other is switched. (the ...


1

I know when the home I live in now was built (mid 60's) grounding was not required for lighting circuits in my area. The electrician that wired the house actually pulled the grounding wires back out of the box (non-metallic) and bound them together behind the box. So none of my lights or switches in the house are grounded. It would be safer to have the ...


2

In a perfect world, with perfect electronics, there would be no need for a grounding conductor. It's there to deal with imperfections. The most likely case for a ground fault in this installation would be if the black conductor lost some insulation and shorted itself against the frame of the fan. In such a situation, the casing could become electrified, ...


1

You can purchase and utilize a common DPDT type relay (Double Pole / Double Throw) to create a cross over switch. It is pretty easy to understand from the following relay diagram: You connect one circuit to the two NC (normally closed) terminals of the relay. The other circuit connects to the two COM (common) terminals. Then you add two additional wires ...


0

Personally, I'd stick with a carrier-current or radio system -- TREMENDOUSLY easier to install, lower risk due to the inherent isolation, UL or equivalent certification so you aren't going to have home inspectors failing your place for code violations... and, frankly, if you are asking this question you shouldn't be designing this system.


0

The Common leg of the 24 volt power supply is where all the 24 volt circuits terminate to complete their circuit.


0

You will wire the cooling transformer to RC and the heat transformer to RH


-1

From my understanding, then it would be wise to use a 15A breaker on this circuit. I'm assuming this is a dedicated circuit too.


0

The outlet is not the fuse or the breaker, so as long as everything is rated it'll be fine. Going larger on wiring or outlets is only insurance, it cannot hurt a thing. The breaker or fuse is what is limiting the circuit's capacity as is desired. You would never want the wiring to be the weakest link. It is the same with doing a job to code, code is the ...


0

The wires from the ceiling box are probably a "hot" wire (black), a neutral wire (white), a ground wire (copper), and a switched-hot (red)(see description here). On the fan you probably have a neutral (white), a "hot" lead for the motor and a "hot" lead for the light that is not there (blue & black). Most fans can be equipped with light kits so they ...


0

Absolutely do not leave the wires alone wrapped in electrical tape. Electrical tape does not have enough longevity to safely protect the exposed leads and can create a hazard in the future. The blue wire exists to support the future addition of a light. The polite thing to do for your future self or future owner of your home would be to connect the blue and ...


0

Green to green, white to white. Assuming you have a two gang switch (two switches at wall, only one used). Blue and Black from fan connected either to the red or black wire from wall. Other wire needs to be wire capped. The black wire from the fan is the hot for the fan motor, the blue is for an optional light kit.


2

The wires themselves don't have polarity, that only exists within an outlet based on it being wired correctly, or reversed (hot/neutral reversed). So essentially you just need to identify the hot wires and the neutral wires, and if you maintain this correctly throughout all of the wiring and correctly wire up your outlets, then polarity will be correct. ...


0

The Itron ACE6000 is a programmable multifunction meter and the way it handles your specific conditions is programmed in the device. You will have to contact your utility to confirm the exact details. In general the power (W) across the phases are summed before the four quadrant energy calculation is performed at a rate of typically once per second. If ...


1

If your basement is even somewhat functional then I would try to wire to the attic. I think a good rule of thumb would be would you let your out of work cousin stay in your basement a few days? If it is even that nice I would go for the attic, given that you can reasonably get to almost all areas of your attic. Remember for bedrooms with outer walls that ...


1

Rewiring a house is an advanced activity; you have to understand what is code and what is reasonable, and then understand how to get wire to the places where you need to get wire. This will probably involve damage to some finished surfaces. I would not go the baseboard route, as it doesn't look very good and you would need to protect the wire against nails. ...


1

In most cases, yes - just look for line conditioning as a feature. Our municipal electric supply is notoriously bad with voltage fluctuations, so I have the vast majority of my electronics running through either a UPS or a line conditioner. Unless your intention is to have a battery back-up, you might be able to get a dedicated line conditioner with ...


1

Are you sure you need a voltage stabilizer? Generally, with modern electronics, the power supply itself will filter out most line noise you're likely to encounter on reasonably modern wiring. (I have seen an Uninterruptable Power Supply pressed into service as a line conditioner, in an old hotel where line voltage could suddenly drop well below 90VAC. So ...


3

I've labeled some things in your photo, that might help you understand what's going on. The wires coming up into the panel are your service conductors, of which you have two "hot" and one "neutral". From there you have "hot" branch-circuit conductors, which are connected through circuit breakers. There's also a branch-circuit "neutral", for each branch ...


0

To directly answer your question, yes, the neutral should be connected form the meter to the same bus as the individual circuits in the apartment for conventional breakers, which only switch the hot (black) wires. For GFCI or AFCI breakers, the neutral/white wire connects to the breaker, which has its own lead to connect to the neutral bus.


2

I am not sure I understand the intent of your question. The neutral wire is not metered. It just passes through the meter box. Old electric meters don't have a connection to it at all. Electric meters monitor both hot legs and add up the kilowatt hours based on current flow through those. photo source. The only remarkable thing I see in your photo is ...


1

Remember that power runs from source, thru meter, to breaker box. That isn't power to meter, it's power FROM meter (two phases, red and black). It makes perfect sense to me that neutral too would be drawn from the main box thru the meter box to the apartment box. I don't see anything questionable here.


5

No, in a situation like this absolutely not. The breaker in this case would need to be 15A. Question is, WHY? Why use #14 wire when the circuit is already #12? Stick with what is there and keep the breaker 20A. In some cases, such as in a kitchen, laundry or bath, you'd be creating a violation doing it like you show in that diagram. And don't be confused ...


1

I personally wouldn't go this route, as it would definitely be a "hope it works" situation. For starters, I would hesitate to drill through stud bays that I didn't have access to both sides of because there is really no way to be sure you wouldn't be drilling through something important, like existing wiring for example. Second, drilling the holes is only ...


0

Use a spade bit in a drill to make the holes just big enough for wire.


-1

This is way late for OP, but previous answers claimed that a double-gang box was required to allow a NEC code-approved "barrier" plate between the high- and low-voltage. Some vendors do make a single gang box option where the box contains an internal divider and you use a special divided receptacle. One example can be seen here: ...


0

It just seems like you have two 3-wire cables (with constant and switched hots) going into and out of that box, along with a 2-wire constant feed. It's not two circuits. The reds are switched and the blacks are constant hot. IMO I would pigtail each color and use the side screws on the receptacle just like they were before. That looks like #12 so you can ...


0

To add to this answer, air conditioners, motors and welders follow different rules than what is considered conventional. The MCA (minimum circuit ampacity) is what you size your wire by. The maximum/minimum fuse or breaker is what you can size your overcurrent (fuses or circuit breakers) by. So this unit, having a 19A MCA, can be wired with #12cu wire, ...


1

Yes, but you MUST cut in old work device boxes first. You CANNOT simply install standard receptacles in the holes in the walls. Here is an example:


1

Neutral to ground should never read 120V. This means your neutral connection back to the breaker/fuse box has gotten disconnected somehow. That needs to be found and fixed.


0

The reference to a switch loop in the related question describes a pair of wires that are both hot or live. The white wire is serving as a black and should have a black marking or tape on it. The switch is serving as a break in the hot line. Every operating device (like a fan or lamp) in standard wiring needs a hot line and a neutral line, and usually a ...


0

I'd agree with Keshlam, ask the local inspector about that specifically. It sounds to me like you don't plan on taking out a permit, which I would probably recommend, it gives you peace of mind knowing the job is done right, it's not very expensive, and you can tell the future homeowner when you sell that it was inspected and done to code. As for circuit ...


0

While you might not think you will have a high load now, if you're going to go through the effort of running cable, why not do it right? What if you or a future owner were to ever use the garage as a shop and have some tools that draw more than 13A? If it's not your house, consult the owner, and if you're willing to take on the cost, I can't imagine why ...


1

As this is, as you suggest, effectively a long extension cable, as long as you don't exceed the 13A maximum that you can draw from the single plug, there is little to stop you doing what you suggest (though it would be prudent to check that you will have enough "headroom" in your proposed cable in terms of voltage drop and earth loop impedance). While you ...


5

The text Volts 208/230 Phase 1 means the device will run on either 208 volts or 230 volts (which is nominally 240 volts). In the amps section, the separated numbers (which are the same) are the corresponding value for operation on 208 or 230 volts, respectively.


0

The trivial way to do this is to buy an off-the-shelf power strip with a switch and 15A circuit breaker, and plug that into a 15A-or-more GFCI outlet. If you don't want to replace the existing outlet, you can do what I did: Buy a standard 15A 3-prong power cord, a GFCI, a box with an outlet faceplate, and a strain relief. Knock out an appropriate size hole ...



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