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0

Is this normal No. But false-readings are a common problem with some multimeters. because I am reading through a switch that doesn't have a load on it? It might indicate some sort of fault in your wiring, however ... It may be an artifact of a cheap but high-impedance multimeter. If your meter has a "low-Z" setting, try that. See Fluke - Ghost ...


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As Speedy Petey says, you should not tap a GFI-protected circuit for lighting. You need to determine whether the other outlets run through the GFCI: Trip the interrupter using the test button and then see whether there is power on the other outlets. If so then they are not wired through the GFCI and you can stay code compliant by tapping them. If not you ...


3

I cannot think of any reason not to install a 200 amp service.


4

My advice would be to install the largest service that you can get regardless of how much you plan on using in the short term. 200amps is pretty typical for a lot of residential areas in North America. Reasons: In most residential areas, you pay for what you use, not overall capacity There might not be capacity on the transformer later when you need it ...


4

In all my years I have never seen a device ground screw rated for two conductors. Even clamp type connectors found on GFI devices are only rated for one conductor. You will need to pigtail a single wire to the device. This can be achieved several ways. A green wire nut, a ground crimp, or a standard wire nut are examples.


-3

While most screw terminals are designed for only a single wire, yes you can put both wires on the same ground screw.


0

I just paid $120 for an electrician to replace two receptacle outlets in my house. The house circuit to two rooms kept intermittently losing power. The circuit breaker was not tripped but resetting would sometimes work, but not always. The power would be off in the evening and when I decided to call an electrician the next morning the power was ...


1

Most screw terminals are designed for only a single wire.


0

Definitely dependent on voltage and cord length. All modern UL listed portable motor-driven tools have wire gauge/length specs. included in the owner's manual. If you do not have the manual you should be able to do an internet search and get one. When in doubt, use heavier wire: a voltage drop across a cord that is too long and/or lightweight will damage the ...


1

Well, to stay complaint with code you cannot do this. You cannot tap off a kitchen receptacle circuit for lighting. Is it done, yeah, I'm sure it is. Is it correct or code complaint, no, not at all. You need to find another circuit to take power from. BTW, the fact that the screws are all used on the receptacles does not mean anything.


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All duplex devices, receptacles, switches, combos, etc, have a small tab between the hot (and neutral if present) terminals. You certainly can take a duplex/stack/dual 3-way switch and isolate the two switches on the device. Just break the small tab between the gold screws. See the small tab with the slot between the screws? A 3-way/3-way version of ...


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A single phase motor has a power factor. The formula for power of a single phase motor is voltage time current times power Cosine of the power factor. The power factor for a motor is determined by the manufacturer but I do not know what a typical power factor is for a single phase blower motor. If you can find this out and measure the voltage and the ...


1

Electrolytic capacitor on those old ceiling fans do go bad. That'll cause the motor to run slow, just hum, or not run at all. With a bad capacitor, it'll often start if you give the blades a push. New capacitors are easy to find at your local big box or lighting stores, and also online.


1

You will need to have to provide proper strain relief of the flexible cord that drops down: (from the NEC) *368.56(B) Cord and Cable Assemblies. Suitable cord and cable assemblies approved for extra-hard usage or hard usage and listed bus drop cable shall be permitted as branches from busways for the connection of portable equipment or the connection ...


1

You should be able to find ground screws at any home improvement store. Most boxes have a tapped hole for this purpose. If yours does not, you should be able to find grounding clips at the home improvement store as well. Keep in mind, however, that continuity does not equal an adequate ground. Just because you have continuity between two of the boxes, does ...


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There is no separate ground bar in that panel because it is the main panel. Both grounds and neutrals share the same bar. Just know that if you add a ground bar only grounds can terminate on that bar. For reference: YES, that is a main panel. It is a split-buss panel. The top twelve spaces are "main" breaker spaces, and technically should only have two-pole ...


1

You separated a neutral splice that was the neutral for a multi-wire branch circuit (shared neutral) while it was live. That's what happens when you do that. Both legs of the circuit then try to find a neutral to return current on so they try to use each other. Some parts of the circuit can see 0 voltage while others can see the full 240V.


1

As I've said elsewhere on this site, I find no-contact voltage testers to be unreliable. I've seen both false positives and false negatives with mine, especially in the presence of multiple conductors, some of which are hot. The only thing I would use a no-contact voltage tester for is to confirm a condition I already know, and even then I would only use it ...


2

I'm not sure "hollowing out" makes any sense. Start by just not completely screwing in the bulbs you don't want lit (or leaving them out entirely). As bulbs burn out, you can switch to using the dead bulbs as your placeholders.


0

Is 5050 the model number or the quantity of leds? The cable you linked to looks very lightweight - you don't need a lot of copper to run leds directly off of low voltage DC but you do need to handle it a lot during installation. I would get something heavier, just for the mechanical advantage. 16AWG stranded 300 volt should do nicely, the voltage rating is ...


3

Although in theory a device on the line side of the GFCI will not trip the device, it can in practice. In theory, a GFCI will only trip when it detects the current is not balanced on its load terminals. Unfortunately, the design of a GFCI makes them susceptible to interference. They can pick up electromagnetic signals, and also may also trip with wild ...


1

As @Tester101 said, not all GFCI's have lights that display in the normal (as opposed to the tripped) state. If the test and reset buttons work as expected, you're probably fine. If you want to be absolutely sure, get a GFCI tester (US$5 or so). If the tester's lights say you're hooked up correctly, and tapping its button trips the GFCI, you're fine.


4

You might try a snubber between the power strip and the GFCI, to eliminate any electromagnetic interference produced by suddenly switching off the pumps. Alternatively, trying a power strip that doesn't have surge protection could solve the problem. Surge suppressors typically route surges to the grounding conductor, which could cause upstream GFCIs to ...


1

OK, let's see if I can make this clear: White from feed spliced to both whites from the romex cables. Yellow from feed to yellow from switch. Orange from switch to black from disposal. Black from feed to black from DW. Be sure to splice all grounds and a ground tail to the box, and put a blank cover on the box.


0

No. A ground-fault on the line side of a GFCI should never cause the GFCI to trip. A GFCI uses a current transformer (CT) to measure for current differences on the ungrounded (hot) conductor, and the grounded (neutral) conductor. In a normally functioning circuit, the CT will always read 0 amperes (or close to it). It is only when the CT reads above a ...


2

This will work fine. The GFI protection is on the feeder side so everything downstream will be protected. Out of curiosity, why the need for GFCI protection?


3

I had the same problem, tried everything, replaced the switch and the thermopile, no avail. Then finally I removed the pilot light assembly, the top just pops off and using a straw blew a bunch of dust out of it. The result was a better flame on the thermopile which allowed the valve to open, try that.


2

If your area allows, you can do the following: Cut the power With a small saw, cut above and below the wire so you can remove the piece facing you on the stud - should leave the wire floating free and the channel should be no more than 1 inch in height. Gently pull the wires out, cut the stud in two and remove On your new studs, cut a channel through the ...


0

Yes, the neutral bar should be isolated from the case and all neutrals should be connected to an isolated bar. You can purchase another bar with isolation mounts and connect it (with a heavy-gauge [4Ga is typical] white wire) to the first neutral bar if needed to provide adequate neutral bar space. Likewise for a non-isolated ground bar, if needed. NOT ...


1

Unplug the fixture or turn off the circuit, unscrew the screw that is visible and its related screw(s), read the information on the ballast (which should be inside the area the screw gives access to.)


2

What you have done is put the two devices in series. Normally, devices are placed in parallel. In series, the voltage is split between the two devices. The actual voltage each device sees depends upon its current rating. A device that draws a higher current (or wattage) will have a lower resistance and lower current a higher resistance. when you connect a ...


0

So you have seen tab failures, along with nut failures? In the 30 years I've been in the industry I've known no other way than to pigtail. If a neutral tab was to break, the outlets downstream from it would go unaffected with pigtailed outlets.


5

Bonded ground/neutral If you have the neutral and ground bonded at a subpanel, then you'll get neutral return current through the ground wire back to the main panel (since there are now multiple paths). Even worse, as @Tester101 points out, if the neutral ever has a fault, everything will continue to work but you'll have all the current on the ground, which ...


4

Let's see if I can draw this all once again... CAVEAT: I'm an electrical engineer, not an electrician. My description of the circuits will be correct, but someone should double-check me on the color-coding conventions. The basic concept of a three-way circuit is that you have two single-pole, double-throw switches hooked up back to back: Switch 1 ...


-2

I would not put a 3-socket outlet on a 2-socket system, even though a lot of electricians do it. The neutral and ground are not the same thing. Neutral is part of the circuit and has electricity flowing through it. Ground does not have electricity flowing through it, unless there is a short. There is already a topic on why you should not connect the ground ...


0

There are 2 phase that goes into your house. Each phase is 120VAC with 120 degree phase shift. The dryer and cooktop most likely require 220VAC to operate. The neutral in 220VAC plays a role just like the earth GND in a single phase 120V, which means this neutral in 220VAC does not carry current. That's why the neutral and earth GND can be connected only ...


1

This is a single circuit, and the neutral is common to all branches of this circuit. In this case, all neutral wires in this box must be connected together. Similarly (and this is regardless of single or multiple circuits/breakers) all grounds must be connected to each other, as well as to the box itself. In the case of your switches, they simply need a ...


-1

Firstly, I am going to assume that the original wiring was done by a licensed electrician. So called common wires (or neutral if you prefer) simply completes the circuit back to the panel. If multiple circuits are going to a box all the grounds would be bound together, but the commons would be on a separate circuit so it sounds like you have just one ...


0

Listen to the first answer it is never permissible to cover(hide) a junction box behind anything. God Bless Big Jim


0

Hello A timer and one lighting relay is all that is needed and the experience to hook it up God Bless Big Jim


2

Are you talking about general lighting circuits for these rooms? not a problem if you have your small appliance circuits fed from this circuit call an electrician. Get a referral and try not to use fixed price franchised electrical contractors. God Bless Big Jim


1

After 30 years as an electrician, most 95% of all electrical problems I've seen are caused by poor connections. The best connection for outlets (receptacles) is to pigtail the wires by first twisting the white (neutrals) together and the blacks (hot) with a separate wire for each going to the terminal screws on the receptacle. Torque the connection ...


0

Right. I've seen this before. Some handyman put in a subpanel, but only ran 120V service to it (who knows why - saving money on wires? Expanding one wire feeding an outlet into a whole sub-panel?) and then jumpers the hots - which works OK if everything is 120V loads - which was probably the case when the panel was installed. This does, of course, mean that ...


0

Ok John this probably not the answer you want to hear but, using a tester as you describe is fine for checking for problems, now is the time to call a electrician to identify and resolve the wiring issue.... most not all homes built around your homes era did not have grounded outlets. Please get a referral and try to avoid fixed price franchise electricians. ...


0

The eyeball or gimbal fixture has spring loaded clips. SHUT OFF POWER, take utility knife and score any paint that may have sealed the ring to ceiling, pull the ring from straight down, compress and release spring tension, pull assembly out of can. By holding the socket in one hand and twist bulb with other......yes/no...safety glasses, gloves, and a bag to ...


0

If your smoke detector was 240V, then you would have a hot from each leg of your service powering it from two breakers. There may or may not be a neutral, and there should be a ground. The two breakers would need to be on top of each other (most breaker panels alternate legs) and should be tied together so they can't be operated independently. If the ...


0

Using one of the many wire size calculators on the internet, for 120v single phase: 1 conductors per phase utilizing a #3 Copper conductor will limit the voltage drop to 2.59% or less when supplying 15.0 amps for 440 feet on a 120 volt system. Also, please be sure to use the actual wire length, not just the distance between buildings (eg taking into ...


0

There is probably a metal ring in the rim of the fixture that hold the light bulb in place. With a flat screwdriver you can remove that ring and then the bulb should drop out.


2

I can't vouch for code, but that's certainly something I would expect would meet code -- you're just using the first switchbox as an unswitched junction box (which should be legitimate), and Red is being used correctly as second/switched hot. Then of course your smart switch in the other box connects between black and red, with white used as the neutral ...


2

Similar question here: Can you have a GFCI breaker protecting a GFCI receptacle? What kind of warranty is this? If this is a newer home it would be a code violation since as @Pigrew says, bathroom receptacles cannot be shared with other areas. If this is an older existing home then it may very well have been perfectly fine at the time of install. Earlier ...



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