New answers tagged

0

I Forgot about this one. 5.8KW on a 240V would only draw a little over 24 amps. in the U.S. this would require 10 Awg wire. A standard wire type THHN 10 Awg crosses over to 4.166 MM as the aprox diameter as listed in the NEC chapter 9 Table 5. I am surprised the cable is not melting this is way under sized. To answer the question: No it is not correctly ...


2

In the UK you would need to pay a professional to remove, or make safe, the gas pipework for the hob. You would also need to pay an electrician to do the work if you need a new circuit for the new electric hob. Whether you need a new circuit depends on the diameter of the wires in the existing circuit and some prescribed "diversity" calculations about the ...


5

How about something like this product (Thanks to A I Breveleri for pointing me in the right direction): http://www.leviton.com/OA_HTML/ProductDetail.jsp?partnumber=5685-2E&section=47084&minisite=10251 15 Amp, 120/277 Volt, Decora Plus Rocker Double-Throw Ctr-OFF Maintained Contact Single-Pole AC Quiet Switch, Commercial Spec Grade, Self Grounding, ...


0

Remote control. A two device unit, one part plugs into the wall outlet and the lamp plugs into it, and the other is a remote control. The remote can be mounted on the wall or Mobil. there are many versions of this option. I am waiting for the price to drop on the Philips Hue system, smart phone controlled and geo tag-able. do a youtube search for "Philips ...


1

There are lots of plug-in receivers, or controllable outlets, for the various home automation systems. Then all you need is a compatible transmitting switch, possibly battery operated. Example: I currently have an X10 setup (cheapest home-automation product in all senses of the word cheap; adequate for playing with for now) in my living room where a remote ...


11

Use a single pole double throw switch, called three-way in the U.S. (as isherwood suggests). Wire it like this and the circuit will do what you say you want. Of course with this, there is no way to ever switch everything off, so the circuit will consume power as long as the building stands. We strongly advise you not to do this. Instead, (again, as ...


21

A single-pole, double-throw switch would do the job. A common 3-way switch is exactly that. You'd simply connect power to the common screw, and run power out from each of the traveler screws. All the neutrals tie together. Here's a nice animation showing the idea. More on switch terminology


2

Even if the conduit is flooded, the wires should be completely insulated from any water. I would use a voltmeter to see what is happening electrically with the wires. If the neutral or ground wires are not at zero volts, then try to determine where the bridge from a "hot" wire is. Hopefully it is in a junction box in the garage or house. You can probably ...


0

If you're dimming LEDs, then some cheaper LED bulbs naturally dim a few seconds after turning on because they are more efficient when cold and quickly begin to reach equilibrium after being turned on. If that isnt the case, then I'll need more information before being able to properly answer this question.


6

Yes, as a short-term solution, terminating the wire in a listed box is a good idea. As a general statement, using something with a higher amp rating than necessary is fine. If you could temporarily cut the power to the circuit, it would be even better, but I can imagine that other things are running...


4

If you use a 100A breaker your main in the mobile home you will need #3 copper wire to feed the sub the sub panel. A 60 Amp breaker in the main panel should provide enough power from the loads listed this would require #6 copper wire. You will need to run both hots a ground and neutral. In the sub the ground and neutral buses need to be isolated. Many ...


0

Yes the hot water exits from top... I don't know who told him it exits from bottom that isn't even possible since the only tube going down that low in the tank is cold... You would never get good hot water if it exited from the bottom, it's simple thermodynamics, heat rises even in water therefore the most efficient way to pull hot water is from the top, if ...


2

Breakers protect wires and receptacles. The wiring from the main panel to the subpanel must be protected by a breaker. It must be in the main panel, otherwise it can't protect the wire run! In other words: if the main-sub run is 10 AWG, it must be protected by a 30A breaker in the main panel. The "main" breaker in the sub-panel is redundant/...


1

So here is the end of the story. After a week of hot dry weather the breaker didn't trip anymore. On Friday morning I tired to turn it on and it stayed on. So wherever the moisture was......was gone. At this point not sure of this is a temporary fix or log term. I put some electrical tape around a few of the areas that should already be water tight. I ...


1

There is no place in the code book that I can recall that requires 12" centers for a bearing wall. You can move over the studs to a 16" center, rather than making a header. If you choose to. The drywall will make it a little tough to do that...


2

For a subpanel application -- what you can do is pull the main breaker out of the panel and use a set of main lugs instead, as the panel disconnect is provided by the upstream feeder breaker (which will be a 30A unit given that your feeder is a 30A feeder). In particular, since the 100A MCB BR panels use a backfed type BR main breaker, you can simply pull ...


-1

It's unfortunate you've already bought the 100A breaker, but NO. The breaker is there primarily to protect the wires, and only secondarily to protect the loads. A 100A breaker will not protect 10AWG wire adequately. Said differently, 10AWG is grossly undersized for 100A breaker. You have two options: replace the 100A breaker with a 30A breaker and use the ...


1

You cannot connect there. Those wires are connected to the black and red wires of the feed from the breakers. This is probably a MWBC and these two wires have 240v across them! You need to connect to the white wire from the breaker panel, as well as either the black or red. This only goes into the junction box and then out to the furnace. Suggest that you ...


1

Provided the mount and cables allow the monitor to be readily removed to gain access to the box, this should not be a Code issue -- the basic requirement is that all junction boxes be readily accessible (i.e. you shouldn't have to tear apart the building to find 'em).


-1

I Think Line means the side FROM which power is coming as opposed to LOAD being the terminal on the power receiving side. You have a power Line coming out of wall junction. You have a load terminal on whatever device being wired. Basically means opposite ends of same circuit. Is th


0

I was aware of four-inch extension rings but the ones I found attached in place of the mud ring. Fortunately someone pointed me to the existence of extension rings that attach to the mud ring. They're listed as attaching directly to a switch box.


0

Even without knowing anything about how your structure sits, I'm 99.9% sure that slapping studs on each side (10" spacing and 14" spacing, as you described) will be perfectly fine. Typical bearing wall construction is 16" on center, frequently with 2x4s, so you'll be up to code and have something to attach drywall to.


2

You are treating a "spa panel" as something special when it really isn't. Considering this is indoors, you can get away with a standard indoor breaker enclosure (NEMA 1) instead of the weatherproof (NEMA 3R) "spa panel" box. In addition, the spa panel looks to be designed solely for surface (not flush) mounting -- flush mounting may cause issues with the ...


1

I have shocked myself touching one of the pins on a USA NEMA connector. My finger just slipped around the end at the wrong moment. So, this is anecdotal, but yes, it is a concern. What do to about it - I think it is a matter of awareness. Perhaps NEMA users have adopted hand postures which normally reduce this risk. This seems to be a risky approach - ...


0

Motor starting loads (its the compressor motor in your A/C drawing all the current) can be very high and it is normal for them to briefly exceed the continuous rating of their circuit including the breaker. If breakers were designed to open with more sensitively, with that kind of load they would nuisance trip all the time.


2

The manufacturer of the receptacle should make this detail clear in their documentation. It might even be printed on the case of the receptacle, though perhaps in very abbreviated / "hieroglyphic" form. That said... My understanding is that aluminum wiring must be used ONLY with approved mechanical connectors specifically designed for aluminum, and of ...


-1

It looks like the metal screw socket would be touchable without the plastic ring in place. When the bulb is lit, I believe that would be hot (energized). Since they may use the same base for different size screw fittings, the ring is possibly designed to protect from shock hazard but being a separate component allows the base to accommodate various sized ...


1

You will need a ohmmeter. Disconnect the IR Controller (the white box with white wires). If you check the the voltage drop (in the connector of the white wire) between the Positive (+) and the different wires. If you find that they all respond to commands from the remote... except for the port for the blue wire (which controls the blue light), then the ...


0

The wires are made of copper, which is normal. It is a good conductor but it does corrode in time. What may have happened: The copper wires were not screwed it very tight. It is also possible that an older, cheaply designed socket simply doesn't clamp in the wires as well as modern ones. Over time, the copper corroded. The point of contact between the ...


1

The sheathing on one of the ground wires appears to be melted. A faulty appliance plugged into the outlet could have overheated the outlet if the circuit breakers (or fuses) weren't working properly. The corroded look on the wires could also have been caused by high temperatures.


0

From an economics perspective, an (unshaded) lawn and a roof the same size are similar, except for needing additional support structures on the lawn. So if "crazy" relates to issues with aesthetics and resale value, I propose these can be dealt with by integrating the photovoltaics panels nicely into the garden. I haven't seen it yet, but integrating ground-...


16

Loose connections can produce heat and cause this problem. The fix is to disconnect and reconnect properly. Spring-loaded "stab connections" are particularly likely to suffer this problem; screw terminals (or shove-in terminals that are clamped by tightening a screw) are more reliable. If in doubt, outlets are cheap and you might want to simply replace this ...


0

Of course I also recommend you a cheap, off-the-shelf charge controller, but for completeness: there are alternatives. Charge controllers do not have to be of the PWM or MPPT type (basically the only ones commercially available), there are simpler designs – see Energypedia on Charge Controller Designs. If you wanted, you could certainly build one from your ...


1

Since you are dealing with 208Y/120V three phase power, the L14-20 isn't quite right -- its presence signifies two phases/neutral/ground, and you don't have a neutral here. The L15-20 is 3phases/ground without a neutral, so it can be used in your application; a L21-20 + adapter can be used instead if something that needs the neutral might be plugged in here ...


3

NEMA 14-20 are intended for two phase power. Of the four conductors, two are energized, one is neutral, and one is ground. (NEMA 14-20 diagram) A NEMA L15 is specifically intended for 3 phase power including a ground (but no neutral). The number after the hyphen is the current rating. That is, NEMA L15-60 is for 60 ampere conductors. (NEMA L15-20 ...


1

My experiance is in the UK but I doubt this differs much. First off how hot is hot? a bit warm is generally ok, too hot to touch is generally a bad sign. Evidence of charring/burning is definately bad. What tends to happen is you get a poor contact, maybe due to corrosion from age, maybe due to weak springs, maybe due to crap design in the first place. The ...


5

The wiring in the wall (12/14awg) is sized to handle the entire capacity of that circuit up to 20/15 amp. The circuit will regularly include multiple lights or outlets within it. The circuitry within the light you mentioned only needs to handle the capacity that that device will use. If you open a device with a larger power draw (blender?) you will notice ...


0

I'm a solar installer in Spain and I am finding the cheap AC/DC compact converters within LED light bulbs designed for AC use are causing high harmonic interference with the main system inverter, causing the inverter to run much hotter and sometimes burn out the diodes on the power board. I would stick with CFL low energy bulbs (although they also have AC/DC ...


2

To find if you have daisy-chained connections; easy: Count the sockets/outlets. If you have 4 sockets, see if you have 4 cables ending up at the entry point of the phone service. On ebay you can get a network tester for under $4 (I think ebay shows it to me in danish currency) "LAN Network/Phone Cable Tester RJ11 RJ12 RJ45 Cat5" It will only show if you ...


2

I'm not sure this is within the scope of DIY but DSL issues are almost always a result of interference on the line. A site like dslreports.com would probably be a good place to start. Either way, I'll type out a long winded answer because I spent a few years doing DSL troubleshooting for earthlink a while ago and this is an issue near and dear to my heart. ...


3

I think you are saying that the heat is being generated at the wall outlet where the male end of the extension cord is plugged in. If this is so, the heat is generated by high resistance at some of the metal-to-metal contacts inside the outlet device, which is caused by the contact areas being too small. Problematic metal-to-metal contacts would be at ...


16

Circuit wire is kept relatively large because general purpose receptacles are just that: general purpose. You can plug a nightlight into them one moment and a kilowatt hairdryer the next. In a fixture, luminaire, or appliance, on the other hand, the designers can use thinner wire (down to 18AWG for fixture wire as per NEC 402.6) as they know how much ...


2

Heavy Duty Indoor 9' Extension Cord (14 gauge) (source)


5

Large appliances like that need extremely burly extension cords which, not surprisingly, cost a lot more money than normal extension cords. Their ends are "fragile" in the sense that it's easy for them to take damage which results in them heating up, at which point the cord needs to be replaced. But even these cords are not intended (nor legal) for ...


9

Most AC units say specifically NOT to use extension cords. The reason for overheating is voltage drop caused by the possible smaller gauge of wire and length of the extension cord. An appliance rated at 12amps probably has a 14 or 12 gauge cord. If your extension is a smaller gauge, it may be too small for the current and heating up like an old fashion ...


2

Why can't you install a proper receptacle near the opener? If you don't want to fish cable through the wall/ceiling, you could use conduit run along the surface of the wall/ceiling. Installing a replacement cord on the opener likely voids the warranty, and UL listing of the opener. Using a cord in this manner is also a code violation (according to ...


2

Both an extension cord and a properly-installed replacement cord (possible built from an extension cord) are viable, temporary solutions in my experienced but unlicensed opinion. You will not overload a 14 gauge cord with a typical 1/3 or 1/2 hp opener. (I'd avoid the lighter 16 gauge cords even if your current plug cord is 16 gauge--you're adding length.) ...


1

This appears to be one of those places where things are muddled because the case is not clearly called out specfically - but the contrary case is mentioned. Threaded RMC connections are tapered pipe threads, designed to hold pressure, as they are used in pipes. Threadless connectors are called out as "needing to be liquid-tight (NEC via conduit maker www....


1

Wire the panels all in series to get the highest possible voltage to the controller. This will keep your current lower, requiring less wire, and allow the MPPT charger to work more efficiently. If you are charging a 24V battery bank, you need at LEAST 26V but it will operate much better with higher voltages. Just try not to exceed 100V. 6 panels is probably ...


0

I found that when I replaced the four incandescent 40 watt lamps in my ceiling fan light fixture with LED 60 watt rated (about 6 watts) they wouldn't work unless I reinstall one incandescent. I think it's because the dimmer needs at least 40 watts to work. I guess I'd better replace the dimmer with one rated for LED, but so far they will dim or work bright. ...



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