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0

You state that the "box is not needed"; I presume you mean not needed for the fixture but that the wire connections originally present still remain. If that is the case then you cannot bury it. An alternative, if there is access to the box from above via a crawlspace or attic, would be to replace or re-orient the box so that access is provided from above. ...


2

Absolutely not. Any box containing splices or live wires, even if it's not being used, must remain accessible.


2

As long as there are no cables in it, you can rip it out or cover it. If there are cables in it, you can't.


0

The first question will be what wires do you have now? In older houses (don't know if yours is or not) it's common to have 3 wires to a heavy 240V load - hot L1, Neutral, Hot L2 - and no separate ground wire. That is no longer accepted, so you need to have 4 wires; the previous 3 and ground. If you have 4 wires, or you add the required ground wire, YES, you ...


1

This is also an unnecessary line in the code. Here is the text: (C) Line-to-Neutral Loads. Multiwire branch circuits shall supply only line-to-neutral loads. Exception No. 1: A multiwire branch circuit that supplies only one utilization equipment. Exception No. 2: Where all ungrounded conductors of the multiwire branch circuit are ...


3

A multi wire branch has a neutral and 2 lives in opposite phase. What the code says is that you may only allow loads connected to only 1 live and neutral (V1 and V2 in the picture) and you are not allowed to have a live to live load (V1+V2) (which would have double voltage).


0

Normally, the grounding wire on a piece of equipment is intended to ensure that if a fault develops which would cause the chassis to become live, it will shunt away any as much current from the chassis as the main could supply to it, typically popping a breaker. A GFCI will ensure that if a conductive path would take current from the mains without feeding ...


2

If the laundry room does not have an electric clothes dryer, then yes, 20 amps at 240 volts should be adequate. That could be arranged as a pair of 20 amp 120 volt circuits: one for the clothes washer and an iron, and the other for the motor of a gas or propane clothes dryer. However, if an electric clothes dryer is needed, that alone should be a 30 amp ...


1

Probably not. While a 20A 240V can supply 2 20A 120V circuits, a third circuit will be on one phase or the other, so you'd very likely end up overloading the supply on one phase (I'm also not sure how you are going to end up with 40A divided across 3 circuits with typical circuit breaker sizes.) I don't believe there are many options where "1 20 amp and 2 10 ...


-1

Stranded is more susceptible to corrosion due to more surface area.


3

Yes, even the receptacle for a GDO in the ceiling is required to be GFCI protected. The exception for this was removed in the 2008 NEC. IMO the reasoning behind this is that folks will plug an extension cord in anywhere they can, even the ceiling. And many folks like to install those pull-down cord reels on the ceiling in the middle of the garage. The GDO ...


0

Similar things exist, but they usually replace the switch, not connect to the switched outlet. Googling "wall mount wireless outlet switch" brings up several relevant products. To make this work you would turn off the power. Then remove the existing light switch. Depending on how it is wired you may need to connect some of the existing wires or just cap ...


0

Perhaps the bedroom circuit breaker is one of the "special extra sensitive" circuit breakers that we have experienced... Unfortunately when we completely rewired our (circa 1939) cabin we ended up with several circuit breakers which had been manufactured just after a new regulation was put into effect. The bedrooms due to a new regulation required a new ...


1

it's usually pretty easy to change the fittings: make sure electricity is off (turn off the breaker that powers the light) double check the electricity is off loosen the screws that hold it up on the ceiling and keep the wires attached. Remember which wire is connected to the ground (bare/green or yellow green striped wire), live (red, orange or blue ...


3

NEMA 14-30 is 120/240V, with neutral to provide 120V from either hot to neutral. Hots are normally black and red and neutral is white. NEMA 6-30 is 240V only with no neutral. Presumably in the old cord, black and white were the hots. You need to cap off the new white wire (neutral) and connect the red (hot2) in its place to L2.


10

Surge protectors do not "cut off or disconnect" power. They sit between the conductors and conduct when the voltage is excessive. Depending how excessive the voltage is and for how long, they may or may not survive any given event. At no point do they cut off voltage to a device, unless the device they are part of happens to fail in a manner that results in ...


8

Surge protectors and circuit breakers both cut off power during exceptional conditions, but they have different purposes and react to different events: Circuit breakers Circuit breakers have only one job: to prevent the wiring inside your house from catching on fire. That's it, they do nothing else. They don't protect you from shocking yourself, or from ...


3

It's referring to the electrical service supplying the house. Most homes in the US are supplied by a single phase service, which is often described as a 120/240 Volt system. If your house is supplied by a three phase system, it could be a 120/208 Volt system. In both these cases you'll be able to install the equipment you have. NEMA 14 devices are four ...


1

According to my calculator 1425 watts at 240V is 6 amps, well within the 13-amp limit. Are the round-pin 16 amp plugs standard in kitchens in India? If yes, that's probably why it has that particular connector. You should be able to get a 13-amp fused plug at any hardware store.


2

Leaving open ports is fine. They make smaller sizes for space considerations. Combination packs are available, though they are more expensive when not bought in bulk. Ideal's Twister® wire connectors(p.3) have specifications for the minimum and maximum numbers of wires. Their In-Sure™ push-in connectors(p.15) are only limited by the number of ports and ...


1

If you had intended for the outlet to be switched then the outlet should have been wired to the red switched wire going to the "hot" side of the outlet. The "neutral" side of the outlet would have been connected to the white wire. In this case the black wire in the outlet box should have been simply wire nutted to cover its end and pushed to the back of the ...


1

You forgot to break the tab off on the outlet. You want the red line to control one half the duplex? And the Black to feed the other continuously? There's a little copper tab between the hot screws that you remove to do this.


0

If it ain't broke, don't fix it. The pump is likely plugged into a single receptacle on a dedicated circuit, because there used to be an exception in the code that allowed a setup like that to avoid GFCI protection. It's possible that the pump will not play well with the GFCI, and then you'll be up shits creek (literally). It's quite possible that the ...


1

There should be no technical problem just replacing both outlets with GFCI units. For end of circuit branch they install pretty much just like a regular outlet. Just make sure to connect the wires in electrical box to the "LINE" terminals of the GFCI unit. When purchasing the GFCI units keep a lookout for the newer lower profile types that use up less back ...


1

GFCI is not required for dedicated circuits when a nuisance trip would be unfortunate - usages such as freezers or sump pumps. So, I would not put a GFCI on those circuits. They must, however, not have outlets that other appliances could be plugged into. The ejector pump is okay, but the sump pump does not conform to code, as it has another outlet. Two ...


1

Current code leans to GFCI the heck out of it, and if it nusiance trips or fails (as they do with some regularity; typically about 10 years) and backs up sewage or water, tough noogies. People who sell GFCIs write the codes, and they have been expanding places where GFCIs are required for years. As of 2002 code (at least) there was still an exception for ...


0

Your exterior outlet is GFCI protected so just (void the warranty) cut the plug off the pump and put one of these on it. The Field Test Survey Task Force examined 2,680 GFCIs installed in 1,090 residences in ten locations within the United States. The task force completed the study and this is the report of the findings. The task force has not attempted ...


0

I purchased 4 identical systems, each with the same LED driver/controller and remote. Each LED strip had to be wired separately with it's own DRIVER/CONTROLLER. Only one remote will operate all 4 strips. The problem however is that the remote can get out of sync with the lights strips and then it's pure h^ll trying to get them all back in sync, only to ...


4

The new 30A panel needs a 4-wire feeder from the 60A panel. This is two hots, a neutral and an equipment ground. The remote 30A panel also needs a grounding electrode (or two) since it is in a detached structure. This grounding electrode has NOTHING to do with the equipment ground run with the feeders. The two serve very different purposes. In the ...


3

If you are running 4-wire from the 60A to the 30A, and the 60A is connected correctly, you already have "a neutral return to the service entrance" in the form of the neutral wire feeding the 60 A box. The ground and neutral bars at both sub-panels should be separate (with the Neutral isolated from the box), and the Neutral wire should be connected to the ...


3

If the last light goes out when the second to last is removed, the wiring error may be: Where electricity travels through the second to last bulb, on it's way to the last bulb. If so the last two bulbs may also have been dimmer than normal (if they are incandescent). The bulb type matters here: using CFL or LED lights during testing can add to the ...


0

From the Installation Instructions If a remote line voltage thermostat is used it should be rated for higher than the amp load of the heater connected. The instructions list your model at 20 amperes. However, NEC requires conductors (210.19(A)(1)(a)) and overcurrent devices (210.20) feeding continuous loads to be rated 125% of the load. So the ...


3

After writing this long answer, here's a YouTube video. I'm not a professional, but I had to do a ton of research for a similar situation at my home, and here's some information that I hope will be helpful. First, it would be easier to break your question into parts, for clarity. I may be misunderstanding your question though. Q1: I don't have ...


0

The start up current of the heater probably is a bit over 20 amps (like 25) for up to a minute. Once it heats up, its load should be at 20.833 amps. For less than an hour, that is an acceptable load, but heating equipment wiring must be rated for continuous load according to the NEC. Either get a lower rated heater instead, or use a contactor. The ...


2

Without cutting drywall, you're going to need to buy a surface mount conduit. This is a rectangular metal tube through which you can run wires. Find an outlet into which you can tap the feed. Remove the outlet (power off! Wires Marked!) and mount a surface box extender. Re-mount the outlet on the extender, and tap your new wire into the feed in the box. ...


5

You need, at minimum, an interlock. That is a device which physically prevents the generator input and the main supply breaker from being on at the same time. Both can be off, but only one can be on. This is important for electrical line-worker safety. If you buy or feel the need of an autostart generator, you will need to move loads to a sub-panel and have ...


0

All dimmers buzz a little bit. They "chop up" the AC waveform, which creates mechanical vibration (buzzing) and electrical noise (EMI). Usually they are the most quiet when the lights are fully bright, and get louder as you dim the bulbs. Here is a good page that describes what is happening. A different dimmer may be quieter, although Leviton does make ...


0

Unless there is already wiring to allow the separation of the fan and light from the same switch (ie. L/F===|sw|==[+]--), then no - you will need to run a second [+] wire from the switch to the fan or light because the current circuit would look like L/F>---|sw|---[+]--. If the circuit is like my first pictorial, then yes - it's just a matter of finding ...


0

How many lights in total? The total wattage of all globes may exceed the switch/circuit rating? i.e. 6x 100W globes on a 400W dimmer or switch. You could possibly run two parallel sets to reduce the load, but this will decrease brightness. e.g. use (+)---switch<===:=:=:===>---(g) rather than (+)---switch---.-.-.-.-.-.---(g)


1

There are ceiling pull-chain switches sometimes used in the UK for bathroom lights, for historical reasons. I don't know how available they would be in the US. Since you're just switching a lamp, you could get a metal blank switchplate, drill a hole in it, and install a lamp- or fan-type pull-chain switch in the wall box.


3

Calculating the total wattage using Ohm's law is quite simple. Watts = Volts (V or E) * Current (A or I) Therefore Watts = 240 Volts * 20 Amperes = 4800 Watts However, if you live in the US (and possibly Canada has similar rules) and follow National Electrical Code, you're not quite done yet. 424.3(B) says that fixed electric space-heating equipment ...


-3

In Canada and in the United States (If i am not mistaken) total wattage is (A x W) x 80%.This goes to say, a double pole bridged 20amp breaker would be consider 40AMP. So 40AMPS x 120(Or corresponding voltage) x 80% = 4800 X .80 = 3840 would be the maximum voltage. In order to find out how many fixtures you can put on that circuit, divide the total save ...


1

Start troubleshooting with any recent fixture, switch, or outlet work on that circuit. Then trace the problem circuit from the main box outward removing every junction faceplate and inspecting. Jiggle and twist connections while looking for issues. It may be resolved just by a few turns here and there.


0

This question really needs more detail as to what your expectations are. Firstly, AutoCAD is a drawing tool that has often been used for Electrical drafting, but Autodesk now have a product (AutoCAD Electrical) specifically for this. It is still based on the AutoCAD package and there are many alternatives produced purely for Electrical Drawing, eg. ePlan, ...


2

Your panel is a 12/24, so every space can have a tandem or even quad breaker. That's what 12 space, 24 circuit means. In the panel schedule you may even see a line or dotted line through the middle of each breaker space. A single 20A breaker can certainly have all that on it, but the question is should it? It all depends on what you will be running ...


2

I'm going to volunteer that yes, there is much more it than knowing AutoCAD.


0

You could put in a sub-panel (which can be greater than or equal to 30 Amps capacity; the load to it is ruled by the wire and the breaker in the main panel feeding it, not "what size it says it is") and breakers to feed branch circuits, if you need (or have use for) the full 30 amps. 30A 240V Dual === 40, 50 or 60 A Sub --- perhaps 4 120V singles - 20A for ...


2

As long as the existing cable has a grounding conductor what you propose is absolutely fine, although you must replace the breaker with the proper two-pole 20A breaker. Although not required I would definitely place a label on the wire in the panel stating it is to be used for a 20A circuit maximum. I would place the 10/3 in a box and branch off with two ...


1

If the dimmer itself is buzzing my suggestion is to replace the dimmer. I would only use a high quality dimmer like Lutron, Cooper, or a higher end Leviton. Also don't get a rotary dimmer. Many cheap rotary dimmers are low quality with little filtering.


3

If this receptacle you are referring to is serving the kitchen counter you CANNOT use that to feed a disposal. Kitchen counter circuits cannot be used to feed fixed appliances. You will need to run a new feed to the disposal, preferably a dedicated circuit from the panel.



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