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5

Anything with sensitive electronics is more susceptible to damage due to power surges. Receptacles don't have any electronics (unless they're GFCI or AFCI receptacles), and it's doubtful that a shop light has any either. If a surge is not large enough to trip the magnetic protection, or long enough to trip the thermal protection, then the breaker will not ...


4

You are on the right track. As it comes from the store, the upper and lower sections of standard double outlets are connected by the small tab connecting the brass plates under the screws on either side. To separate those sections so that one half is constantly on and the other half is switched, break the tab on the hot side of the outlet. This is usually ...


3

I can't be 100% without a relay part number or datasheet -- but most commonly, that type of specification would be 8A switching a resistive load (say a small heating element), and 3A switching an inductive load (say a fan motor). Solid-state inputs and relay coils generally don't draw enough current to be a problem.


2

National Electrical Code says that you cannot connect conductors 1 AWG or smaller in parallel (310.10(H)). Since it's not likely that the conductors between your buildings are larger than 1AWG, you cannot do what you want. What you can do, is install a new larger double pole breaker in the main panel. Then install a new set (4 conductors) of larger ...


2

Based on NEC 320.12(1), I'd say no. National Electrical Code 2014 Chapter 3 Wiring Methods and Materials Article 320 Armored Cable: Type AC 320.12 Uses Not Permitted. Type AC cable shall not be used as follows: (1) Where subject to physical damage There have been proposals to change it to say "Where subject to excessive physical ...


2

There is a distinct possibility that another another component of the AC unit has some how gone bad and is overloading or injecting bad signals back into the control board and in turn burning it out. It would take local diagnosis - along with a service schematic of the unit - to be able to isolate the faulty component. But your repeated replacement of the ...


2

If you can remove the existing grounding wire from the grounding screw, then do that and connect your 4-prong's grounding wire to the screw. I initially misunderstood your explanation of the existing grounding wire. If this is a wire coming from inside the dryer, then you'll likely need to connect it to the neutral lug once you've connected to the ...


2

Tom, if the spotlight still lights up, it might be sufficient to just turn off the light switch leading to the fixture. That's assuming the power enters the switch box, and there's only a hot and neutral (and ground) going to the light fixture. Tape the light switch in the off position and tell everybody to leave it alone until you're done. ;-) Or you can ...


2

40 watts at 12 vac is about 4 amp which leaves plenty of headroom on the 12ga cable (which is normally rated for 20 amps (with heat loss and safety factors included). But what if your wire gets cut? Shorted? the worst case max current that a 300 watt transformer can put out (if it really is a 300 watt not a 310 watt or 315 watt) is 25 amps which is flirting ...


1

If it's a simple light fixture that does nothing more than hold bulbs, there's only a couple things to check. Socket base The first thing to check is the socket base(s), size and shape. I'm not sure what's common in Hong Kong, but you'll want to make sure bulbs from the US can fit in the sockets. Wire size The next thing to check is the size of the ...


1

Depends partly on the device. Some electric ranges/cooktops/driers have electronic controls which run on 120V even though they're controlling 240V; they get that 120V by connecting between one leg of the 240V supply and neutral. In that case, obviously, without neutral those controls don't run.


1

The multimeter may be off trying to accurately measure an AC voltage that ends up looking like chopped AC cycles. There is a good possibility though that no load on a triac switch of the dimmer could look like an AC waveform of full voltage to the relatively high impedance of the multimeter input if the dimmer design has a resistor/capacitor snubber ...


1

Standard electrical outlets in both Britain and South Africa supply 230V at 50Hz. There's a fair chance your dishwasher would adjust and work on 120V/60Hz power, too if you were bring it to someplace like the U.S. or Canada. That's not guaranteed, but manufacturers tend to like to sell their goods into more than one country. Regardless, electricity in ...


1

Usually it's physically obvious - depending on how exposed the wiring is (typically in the basement, if at all) it can be easier or more difficult to be sure, but it will almost always be the one closest to the breaker box. In some cases the wire routing won't be so straightforward, but usually it is. I'm assuming you are capable of safely working with ...


1

The primary consideration is not the static load, but the dynamic load from a heavy, rotating load. That's why there are electrical boxes specifically designed and designated by code for ceiling fan loads. See http://homerepair.about.com/od/electricalrepair/ss/elec_box_ltg.htm#step5



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