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3

Looks like you've got a 1 gang 5 hole outdoor electrical box, like this. A couple weatherproof lampholders, and a motion sensor. You should be able to find each of these sold separately, at your local hardware or big box store. To replace them, you'll have to be comfortable doing electrical work, and working from a ladder. If you're not comfortable ...


3

All conduit has a fill rating (which equates to 40 % of the free area full of wire, unless there are only 1 or two wires - in practice, less fill is better - the full-rated fill is VERY hard to pull into conduit. That is slightly different for different type conduits due to the different actual size of the hole in the different types of conduit. There are ...


3

Like @Petey said you need a different kind of tester, and one of those plug-in testers with the 3 lights is great for receptacles. Assuming all is properly grounded the tester is capable of indicating an open neutral. I would first confirm that an open neutral condition exist before you go any farther, and then understand that the problem (the bad ...


2

You're in conduit, use individual wires - they are cheaper, they pull easier, and the conduit fill on cables is terrible. Typically we shoot for less than 3% voltage drop at rated current. Less drop is OK. I'm fairly sure you need 6Ga wire minimum for a 60 Amp feed - given a short 30 foot run, this is also probably perfectly adequate. I'm getting 1.8% drop ...


2

You are not using a "tester". You are using a voltage sensor. Big difference. You are getting a voltage reading but it's not working? This is almost certainly an open neutral on this circuit. A circuit needs both hot and neutral to work. Get yourself a real tester and test from hot to neutral and hot to ground anywhere possible. Find the open neutral and ...


2

My guess would be an underrated circuit, not a short-circuit. The amount of power used (and therefore amperage pulled) by an oven is linearly-proportional to the amount of heat it generates. Thus, if the circuit was underrated, it would trip at nearly the same temperature every time. What is the amperage-rating of the oven, and of the circuit? Also, are ...


1

What you call circuit power supply cable, electricians call the feed. A feed is a hot and its neutral uninterrupted by any device from the source (the panel). You need access to the feed to tap into that circuit. In both of your diagrams the feed is in the box with switch #1. In your 1st diagram switch #2 has the neutral but not its un-switched hot in the ...


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If both switches are of the type 2 configuration in your diagrams, then no. You need unswitched power from somewhere to either the new light or new switch. For example, if either of the switches in the 3 gang box were of the type 1 configuration, then you have unswitched power and can add another switch. To do what you want you would need to run another ...


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I have noticed that GFCIs seem to be worn out by heavy, prolonged loads. I can't find any authoritative sources for this effect. Probably the GFCI manufacturers know all about it. The bridge circuit which detects the flow imbalance depends on some precision electronics which are heat sensitive. The heavy current itself does not affect them, but the side ...


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Plywood is usually used when mounting a panel to masonry walls for a few reasons. Isolation Masonry is not a great insulator, which can lead to problems especially where the wall is below grade. The cabinet has to be bonded to the grounding electrode system. Because of this, if you mounted the cabinet directly to a below grade masonry wall, you could end ...


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In SE Pennsylvania and the surrounding area, I don't think I've ever seen a panel mounted to a residential masonary wall without a piece of wood between the panel and the wall. I started reading NEC around 1973 and would bet money (not a lot) that in one or more of the code cycles then or since stated that a painted piece of wood could be used for installing ...


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It is up to the local authority what to require. The NEC only says that work be neat and workman like and that equipment be firmly attached to the surface to which it is mounted. It's generally understood that it's impossible to firmly mount anything to drywall, thus a more substantial surface is required. What that is is up to the local authority. I've ...


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Pull 4 conductors (2 ungrounded (hot), 1 grounded (neutral), 1 grounding) (250.32(B)(1)). Grounded (neutral) and grounding bus must be separate at sub-panel (250.32(B)(1)). No need for a GFCI breaker in the main panel, unless your local code requires it. A grounding electrode is required at the second structure (250.32(A)).


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What do I need to know besides ampere rating on those fuses must be equal or slightly higher than what my electrical equipments use? Nothing much. Use a BS1363 fuse. The job of the fuse in the plug is to prevent the wire between plug and appliance from overheating (and setting your home ablaze). The size of wire (cross-sectional area of conductors) ...


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That standard fuses supplied with these plugs are normally rated at the circuit capacity of the supply outlet and associated wiring. They blow when the current exceeds that of the circuit and the current rating of the plug itself and the connected wiring. Your idea to replace these with a current reading closer to the load rating is a good idea if the plug ...


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First of all, you are mistaken about your assumption that there is a difference in voltage on different size coils on an electric range top. The switches, wiring harness and sockets are the same for all the range top coils. there is no difference in voltage and all feeds are interchangeable except for the length of the wire feed that helps keep the ...


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I don't think the use of these colours are standardised (outside of use in plain old-fashioned land-line telephone systems). I would disassemble the other end and see how the wires are connected up there. Most likely, two are connected to a push-to-make switch. If you are sure the system is unpowered, you could use a multimeter to check all 6 combinations ...


1

If you have evidence of rodent damage to other wires in that location then maybe it's worth doing something more. But otherwise if using conduit is the more difficult method, I don't think I'd bother. If your garage is open framing and you can run from point A to point B in an approved NM fashion, that's the way to go. Nail a plastic 2 gang box to a 2 by and ...



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