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7

By all common sense you should not try to splice an appliance cord to make it longer. What you should really do is to open up the appliance and remove the remaining chewed off chunck of cord. This may require you to free any type of cord retainers and / or strain reliefs. Then a new cord of ratings same as the original should be installed in place of the ...


4

Considering the age of the home, the only complaint, and in my opinion safe, alternative is to have a new circuit run to the bathroom for the GFI. It is almost guaranteed that in a bath a hair dryer will be used, which is a huge draw for a general use circuit. So adding a receptacle to the existing wiring will not only not be code complaint, it will stress ...


4

This is a VERY misinterpreted section of the code, especially by lay people and home inspectors. Most homeowners and likewise simply think a water heater cannot be near a panel, for what reason I don't know. Basically, the panel can be anywhere in the 30" width working space. There is no mention of center of the panel or otherwise. Meaning, the panel can ...


4

I am going to guess that the outlet that the lamp is plugged into is the same one each time you have tried this. You may want to try plugging the lamp into one of the other four outlets. If the lamp does not come on then read on here. It is clear that the lamp outlet is wired in a daisy chain manner such that power feed comes first to the lamp outlet and ...


3

I wouldn't expect it to be anything more than a resistive element so it shouldn't be polarized... but the maintenance manual is almost certainly available on the weB, free or for a small fee, so I'd suggest you check that.


3

If there's no permanent ladder or stairs leading to the attic, you may be able to simply lay the cable across the rafters. "Where this space is not accessible by permanent stairs or ladders, protection shall only be required within 1.8 m (6 ft) of the nearest edge of the scuttle hole or attic entrance.". National Electrical Code Chapter 3 ...


3

Column C First off you'll notice the text "Column C to be used in all cases except as otherwise permitted in Note 3.)", in the title of table 220.55. This makes it simple. You have 2 appliances, so follow that over in the table, and you'll see 11 in Column C. So there you go, you can just use 11 kW. Done. 11,000 W / 240 V = 45.8333 A So you'll need a 50 ...


2

Typically your electrical utility is only responsible for delivering service to the meter, everything after that belongs to the home owner. So it might be true that they did not detect any issues to the meter. A fault can occur in almost any place of your electrical systems, and depending how it's designed, even a seemingly small issue can have a large ...


2

In most modern fixtures that have multiple lamps, the wires are preconfigured going into the hood so that there is only one black (hot), one white (neutral) and one green or bare (ground) wire coming from the fixture to be attached to the wires in the box. If there are separate wires for the three lamps, all three black wires should be twisted together and ...


2

First off. The only way to provide proper "grounding", is to install a grounding conductor from the panel to each outlet. Providing AFCI and GFCI protection to the circuits is helpful, but these devices will not provide "grounding". If you switch from 2-prong receptacles to 3-prong on these circuits, you should not connect anything to the grounding screw ...


2

Short answer is no, not a good idea to do this. First, splicing cords is a bad idea as they become fire hazards. A splice drastically weakens the cord possibly allowing the conductors to separate which then will cause sparking. The other, is the dimmer. The manufacture of the lamp most likely used the cheapest dimmer possible to run the lamp. Putting ...


1

First off, the first electrician is wrong in saying that the use of a crimp-type terminal in house wiring is categorically unsafe. Crimp-type terminals listed under UL 486A for use on solid wire of the given gauge are considered acceptable for use in building wiring, as per UL 486A section 1.1: These requirements cover pressure wire connectors and ...


1

You probably can install a GFCI receptacle in the bathroom, but you might find that it takes more wiring than you're anticipating. In older installations, it's common to only have two wires going to switches. This is known as a "switch loop", and it does not include a grounded (neutral) conductor (which is required for a receptacle). If you open up the ...


1

Points one and two, I can't make a definitive answer but generally when a ground is not provided a GFCI provides acceptable protection. As for point 3, grounding issues is a major source of noise/static. If the item is not grounded the metal case around the device will be very ineffective in shielding the device from EM interference. Likewise, any EM ...


1

As long as the circuits are 120V you can run a 3-waire cable. The only caveat is that you would then need to use a two-pole GFI breaker to protect the circuits. With two 2-wire circuits and single-pole GFI breaker (or devices) you can isolate the circuit for troubleshooting and maintenance.


1

I'd recommend option 1 or 3 -- AFCI receptacles are much more limited in their functionality than CAFCI breakers are, due to the receptacle being further downstream in the circuit. Also, not all installations conform to the requirements for installing AFCI receptaclesEDIT: the Code I quoted is for new installs only, 210.12(B)(2) permits receptacle AFCIs in ...


1

Use the solid state to drive a relay (that actually switches the baseboard) that is rated for the amps.


1

The voltage rating of 300V is irrelevant because you'll only be using a 120V power system. All it means is that the original plug is capable of being used with higher-voltage systems (240V plus some room to spare) even though the heater it was attached to probably isn't. As you said, 1500 W at 120V is 12.5 amps, so a plug rated for 15A should be fine. Note ...


1

Assuming the GFI isn't defective, there are three common things that can keep it from resetting: There is no power to the outlet. The GFI is wired in backwards: the wires coming from the breaker box are connected to the "load" side of the outlet rather than the "line" side. There is a ground fault somewhere in the circuit the GFI is protecting. Given ...


1

The switch must be in a listed and labeled enclosure, or the switch itself must have a built-in enclosure. The switch should also be rated for the voltage, and current, to which it will be subjected. You'll also want to make sure the switch is attached in such a way, that normal use will not rip it from the enclosure. Pull chains can be subjected to a lot ...


1

Would you try a motion sensor inside the closet rather than a jamp switch? That would allow the bypass sliders to close either way, and the light would go off after a certain time whether the doors were tightly closed or not. The motion sensor would trigger when one reached in to the closet, but getting it to come on reliably might be a bit finicky.


1

I can find nowhere in the NEC that says that you must bury inter-electrode bonding jumpers. In fact, 250.64(B) explicitly allows for running grounding electrode conductors (such as inter-electrode bonding jumpers) along construction or otherwise aboveground when suitably protected against physical damage, etc.: Securing and Protection Against Physical ...


1

Call a friend and have them come help you. Tell them to bring a cell phone. They will go from room to room with you on the phone, floor to floor as you switch off each breaker one by one. When the power goes off in the room they are in, mark on your electrical panel which breaker/fuse you pushed and Confirm what room your friend is in. No matter the size ...



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