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6

The dimming lights is caused by voltage dropping. This could definitely happen from others in your neighbourhood turning on large loads. Typically anywhere from a few houses to an entire block will share one transformer, so you are pretty much directly sharing the power with them. If this happens frequently, contact your utility company. They will be ...


5

This product by Hubbell is about the only thing I can think of that will provide the equivalent of a two-gang duplex (quad) receptacle on an octagon box. http://ecatalog.hubbell-wiring.com/press/pdfs/H4416R.pdf Amazon.com even has them: ...


5

That does seem high for an unoccupied building, but not imposssible. It works out to about 5 amps drawn 24 hours a day. These are plenty of things that might be adding up. The biggest ones would be: Electric hot water. Even if you dont use it, it keeps getting reheated AC or electric heat, if they were left on or there is a faulty thermostat turning ...


3

As Ariser mentioned, what type of broke is broke? If you mean the light switch simply doesn't turn off and on any longer then you should be fine. Any Major electrical problems would either be kicking breakers, making the lights dim or you would smell foul burning plastic. I would however fix it ASAP to avoid even the chance of an electrical fire.


3

In my opinion, nearly all DIY light fixtures are hazards. However, since ceiling fixtures are rarely touched, they're not so bad. If you want to add a grounding conductor, it shouldn't be too difficult. First find a point on the fixture that will hidden within the canopy, and that is metallic. Figure out a way to attach a grounding wire to that point. ...


3

What you have is called a split-buss panel. Code allows up to six "main" breakers or disconnects. The top six double-pole spaces in your panel are all main disconnects. One (spaces 9/11) is the "lighting main" which shuts off the bottom half of the panel. The lugs at the top of the panel are unfused lines coming from the meter. As a side note, the ...


3

Turn off all the breakers, try them one at a time and see when the voltage returns, this should help to locate the problem area. Once you have the area found, turn on all the breakers, except the breaker to that area, and check it again. Now with the problem breaker/breakers off, go through the devices and check if any have a bad wire. I would start with ...


3

Go to the main breaker box and find the main breaker, or "Service Disconnect". It will be separated from the other breakers, and perhaps even in a different box. The number on the breaker, eg "100" is the max number of amps that your box is wired for (Of course, you would need to distribute your load appropriately. Have you looked into renting a large ...


2

You have 2 easy solutions. You can pull two breakers from the main panel, and relocate them to the sub. Or you can replace 4 breakers with half height breakers to make room and free up the connection to the new panel.


2

I'll tell you with 100% certainty that you CANNOT do this. Period. It is a serious code violation and safety issue to have the new 100A feeder be unfused.


2

If there's no current to the fixture or switch, then the fault is upstream. The fact that it was flickering indicates a failing connection, possibly arcing somewhere, which can be a fire hazard. You should check all the junctions on this circuit from the switch back to the breaker until you locate one with a good hot, neutral, and ground connection. And then ...


2

Since it's only detecting it near the water dispenser, everything is most likely working properly. The water dispenser will likely have some electrical wiring near it to run motors or valves or what have you, and that is what it is picking up. They are probably run quite close to the surface of the frame. Your meter is designed to detect up to about 2 ...


2

Unless you have a disconnect next to the panel or meter, you do not have a main breaker. What I think you have is a main Lug split panel. If you look at circuit 9/11, fifth breaker from the top left side of the panel, that should shut down the lower part of the panel. Warning: You'll be working around live electrical wires during this procedure. If you ...


2

Pull out the wire that's in conduit, (look it over, but it's probably just fine) pull in that wire and a ground. It's darn near impossible to pull in another wire without pulling the whole bundle out and back in. It's fairly straightforward to pull the whole bundle out, add a wire and pull back in, unless the conduit is too small. Code-wise, (250.118) ...


2

As long as the second standard receptacle is correctly connected to the GFCI receptacle as well as properly labeled with the usual "GFCI Protected" sticker, it should be acceptable for code. The downside is it will look awkward and you should think more about if saving the small amount of extra money for an additional GFCI receptacle will be worth it.


2

I'd drop in a sub-panel and run circuits from there. Overload would blow the sub-panel breaker. Unlikely that a shop and dryer would be used simultaneously causing an overload. Same thinking using a dryer circuit to charge an EV.


1

The code doesn't care if you say you're not going to use stuff at the same time, it assumes you will. I don't think it would be a code violation to have multiple outlets on a 240 volt circuit (though I could be wrong). The number of outlets is not restricted (at least not that I've seen), based on voltage. However, the conductors have to be sized for ...


1

There are a few concerns: Neutral and Grounding First and foremost to do any of this would require a neutral conductor and a non current carrying conductor known as a ground/earth. Undersized Grounding Most double pole branch circuit grounds are only sized at #10. This is only good for up to 60 Amps according to the NEC. The total Amps gained with the ...


1

@AndyMcKenna No, the way you have the switches wired will not work correctly. If you look at your new switches there should have 3 terminal screws. There should be two copper looking screw(traveler wires), setting across from one another, and one dark screw(power in and power to the fixture) at the bottom of the switch by itself. Warning: You'll be ...


1

Both conductors can carry the maximum current. However, since it can either be a 240V circuit or a 120/240V circuit, it can seem a bit confusing. At no time will you be able to draw more than the max current, but it is possible to have the maximum current on both conductors. In all cases, both ungrounded conductors will have to be rated to carry the maximum ...


1

Not that I'm aware of. National Electrical Code has capacity limits depending on the volume of the box. Standard practice would be to install a second box next to the first. If you happen to weld then you could: cut off a third from 2 octagonal 4 inch boxes (keep the 2 screw tabs in place), clamp the two cut boxes together and weld the joint. You now have an ...


1

The main breaker shows the total Amps allowable. It is usually outside by the meter or in the house inside the main panel. Things to Consider Under normal conditions an average home will consume between 20 - 30 amps continuously. Without physically testing with an Amp probe, there is no definite certainty of knowing what the average Amp load is. ...


1

You think you've found all the nails-through-wires, but there's one more. I once had a friend who's garage light switches suddenly started operating different lights, and I traced it to a 16p nail that a roofer had put through two separate runs of wire, one of which was a three-way switch send, and the other a regular single send. The nail shorted one leg ...



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