Hot answers tagged

11

The plug specs are the maximum ratings given for how the plug is meant to be used in any given application. So a plug speced as 120V/30A is not designed to be used in applications over 120V and not to be loaded over 30A. Now that said....those numbers do not directly have anything to do with the capabilities of the supply circuit or wiring. If the circuit ...


10

I'm a big time movie Ask your best boy to handle this. ☺ I'm dumbfounded by what is expected from me. The light fitting apparently requires a hook in the ceiling. Am I at risk for being electrocuted? Yes. ⚡ Go to your main panel and turn off power to the light circuit. Test that power is off. Use a Cat-II (or better) rated test device. ...


9

The use of these devices is limited to specific situations, which are described in 334.40(B) of the National Electrical Code. The 2011 version of the code had this to say. National Electrical Code 2011 334.40(B) Devices of Insulating Materials. Switch, outlet, and tap devices of insulating material shall be permitted to be used without boxes in ...


8

I have no idea why, but an open coupling for a lamp is called a hickey... As in 1/4" IPS Brass Hickey: I've also seen this sold on some sites as an "open cast coupling" or "open cast hickey".


7

Yes, it does cost you money using the extension cord. Grabbing a random number out of the air, let's say the fridge draws 2 amperes. If you have a 50 ft. 16 AWG cord, that's 1.996 watts. If the cord was 50 ft. 14 AWG, that'd be 1.256 watts. Using the energy star standard of $0.12 per KWh. The 16 AWG cord costs you $0.00023952 per hour, while the 14 AWG ...


6

This is trouble, but easily solved. Simply swap out the 50 ampere GFCI breaker, for a 15 ampere GFCI breaker. You'll possibly have to use pigtails to connect to the breaker, as it may not accept the size wire used for the existing circuit. As "subpanels" seem to be quite popular around here, I'm surprised it hasn't been suggested yet. You could always ...


6

If the fan has a pull chain as well as the remote the pullchain MUST be on high speed. The remote control only slows the fan down. Bottom line is no, you cannot re-wire a ceiling fan like this to make it go faster.


5

Junctions and terminations must be in a box, and the box must be accessible. You can't bury it under a floor. Unless you have an idea where the source is, you'll need to treat the wires as though they're live.


4

Inovonics Wireless SKU: EN1723 The Inovonics EN1723 provides internal measurement and external thermistor options in a single device. The on-board sensor is excellent for monitoring ambient indoor temperature, and the external sensor is user selectable to match your application. (source) Like Tyson notes, these are used in zoned systems. The ...


4

Just looking the fixture itself, and giving the probability of other points of failure... I would guess maybe the ballast on the lamp has given out (probably the silver box in the image). A ballast steps up the voltage so the lamp operate correctly, and they fail on occasion. Finding the replacement ballast might be the hard part and sometimes expensive. ...


3

Pulling some stats from advertised products: Gauge Conductors: 16/3 SJO Cord Length: 50 ft. Color: Black Watts: 1625 watts OSHA Listed: Yes Plug Type: Grounded Number of Outlets: 1 Maximum Amperage: 13 amps AWG rating: 4.016 ohms/1000 ft , or 0.4016 ohms for your 50-footer, round trip. Using I^2R, which isn't exactly correct for AC due to phase ...


3

10/3 is FINE for the dryer. 12/2 for the washer.


3

Does a receptacle have to supply the max current that it is rated for? Simple answer A receptacle, and the circuit supplying it, has to do only one or other of two things: Either safely provide the full rated current, continuously, at the full rated voltage (±10% †). Or safely trip an overcurrent protection device (a circuit breaker) and disconnect ...


3

From what I can see in the fuzzy pic, someone wanted a double-gang outlet where there was a single-gang box. They apparently didn't want to cut the wall at all. There's probably no concern as far as safety, but pop an outlet tester into it to be sure.


3

If you plug a device into an L5-30 receptacle, you can expect that the device can draw up to 30 amperes @ 120 volts. If you plug a device into an L6-30 receptacle, you can expect that the device can draw up to 30 amperes @ 240 volts.


3

250V is the insulation rating of the L6-30 plug. It's the "never-exceed" voltage. Normally it's used for 240V single phase (delivered as split-phase). However in some locales, mainly NYC, they supply houses with two legs of 208V 3-phase wye. So it is 120V phase to neutral, and 208 phase to phase. There is no separate receptacle design for "208 2-leg", ...


3

No. It's a poor way to hook up a permanent load, but it does not waste anything like "as much power as the fridge uses" - it might cost you in life of the fridge, due to low voltage when the compressor is starting making it fail sooner than it should - but that would depend in part on the gauge (size) of the wire in the cord.


3

Have you read the manufacturer's documentation? The switches in the remote likely are for setting the transmitters frequency, and have nothing to do with fan speed. Usually fans have a speed selector switch (pull chain) that allows you to select LOW, MED, HIGH, or OFF. If that switch is in the LOW setting, that's as fast as the fan will spin despite ...


2

Even for a novice, I would suggest basic, inexpensive test equipment like a $20 Kill-a-Watt, sold on Amazon or Menards (there are also more featureful alternatives for a little more money). If you're blowing a lot of stuff, my first thought is you have high voltage. There's a specific thing to watch for: a lost neutral. American power is 240V with a ...


2

I figured it out after opening it up. The old switches the previous owner installed were actually upside down and the common terminal was in the wrong spot, so when I tired them up the same way the hot was only being properly fed by one switch and when that switch was off the other switch wouldnt work. Once I figured out that that was the problem it was an ...


2

Does a receptacle have to supply the max current that it is rated for? No. Suppose you come across a L5-30R (120V, 30A receptacle) somewhere. By spec, can you assume that there will be 30 amps at it? No. Follow up: if you come across a L6-30R (250v, 30A), does it have to supply 240-250v, or can it supply 208, or even 120? If they are ...


2

Depending on whether you have an electrical dryer or a gas dryer, the answer will be different. I am going to assume you are in the US, and using an electrical dryer. Then the calculation goes like this: Assuming you have an electrical dryer, typical power use might be anywhere from 1800 W to 5000 W source. But let's assume the dryer you have is right at ...


2

Typically a 220v/30 amp Dryer circuit would utilize 10/3 with ground. According to this voltage drop table, it looks like for 100' run you would want to up-size the wire to #8 copper, to maintain voltage drop less than 3%. So you have arrived at the correct conclusion within your question to use 8/3 with ground.


2

If the dimmer controls only one light, the four wire bundle is almost certainly a group of hot leads powering several fixtures or outlets in addition to the dimmer and its fixture. The single wire from the dimmer goes to the fixture it controls. You can confirm this by checking the leads using a non contact tester. Make sure the wires are not touching the ...


2

The very best way to answer your question is to purchase an energy measuring device and compare power consumption at the house end with the refrigerator connected directly at the house and then connect the refrigerator at the end of the long cord. Keep the measuring device in the same location for both of the comparison measurements. One device you could ...


1

Last thing you want is a dodgy circuit breaker. I suggest that you replace it so when and if you ever have need for that breaker to protect a circuit you can depend upon it to work properly. I got the impression from reading your posting that you are using this circuit breaker as a regular switching function. Be aware that some breakers are not intended to ...


1

I use separate detectors from lamps, and here's how I wire them. First, I use the type of sensor which has its own neutral (rather than the type which has no neutral and sits in a "switch loop".) This is very important. The sensor needs to be able to power itself independently (via hot and neutral) and not care what if anything is on the output. I run ...


1

Given the large size of the conductors, I would use aluminum for this, specifically the new AA-8000 series alloys. Yes, aluminum has a bad reputation as a wire. But that only applied to the faulty AA-1300 alloys installed during the postwar housing boom, and even then to the small-gauge stuff where it was used instead of 12-14 gauge copper. 1300 is now ...


1

It appears as though you have four slots available at the garage panel on the left side of the panel in your picture and one in the upper right. The neutral bar is on the bottom of your picture with the white wires. What seems to be the problem?


1

I see those ferrules all the time on the lights I get from those friendly east Asian purveyors of sensibly priced goods. They are supplied in brown/hot and blue/neutral, which are Europe and UK color standards. European use screw terminal blocks to terminate wires, so those ferrules work rather well with them. They also increase the effective wire size ...



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