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6

For a multi-bulb fixture the LED units do not want to be in the area where high heat is generated as would be the case with incandescent or especially with halogen bulbs. CFLs have their own special considerations if they are used in situations with special types of lamp dimmers. Such special dimmers may not be compatible with LED lighting modules. ...


5

Enclosure You start with an enclosure that includes a backplate (interior panel) -- usually this is purchased separately from the enclosure itself, but the manufacturers make sizes that fit mounting holes in their enclosure. Enclosures come in many sizes, different materials, different NEMA ratings, different cover options (screw-on/hinged, handles, ...


3

In working on computers, or for that matter of fact most electrical equipment, avoiding static damage is achieved by establishing a ground plane. It's not whether you're connected to earth potential, but rather the fact that everything you're working on is at equal potential. You can get by easily by having an antistatic mat on a desktop that you've laid ...


3

From an efficiency standpoint you would be way better off to use the sun to heat the water up instead of converting to electricity in the middle of the process. Modify the dishwasher to accept the solar heated water instead of dumping any electricity into the heater coil. To get even more efficient adopt a washing strategy with cold water cleaning in a ...


3

If the AFCI was required in the first place, ie: the code in place when the circuit was originally installed (regardless if they are required now), then yes, removing it and replacing it with a standard breaker created a violation. The rest is a legal issue and not appropriate for this forum. Have your friend call the building dept for the ONLY accurate ...


3

Older receptacles tend to lose their "grip" on the prongs of a plug. Many times this higher resistance connection creates a lot of heat. This is a VERY common problem with dryer receptacles for some reason. I would definitely change the receptacle. Keep in mind, a 15A duplex receptacle is TWO 15A receptacles on a single device yoke. It is a 20A feed-thru ...


3

You'll want to start by contacting your service provider, and asking them if there is a problem with their distribution system. Ask if they're providing poor service due to high demand. If they're not aware of any problems in your area, you should ask them if they can come out and verify you have a good hookup. If everything with the electric company checks ...


2

To check that the coax is grounded properly you need to measure between the outside of the coax cable and ground - preferably the ground pin of an outlet that actually has a ground. It should read 0v or close to it. If there are other properly grounded outlets you might be able to run an extension cable and use its ground to test. You should also measure ...


2

Near where the service enters the house, you should see a grounding block similar to this. The coaxial cable from the pole/dish/mast should be connected to one side, and the coaxial cable feeding to the house should be on the other side. The screw terminal should have an insulated copper wire, larger than 14 AWG, and shorter than 20' (6 m) attached. The ...


1

Depends on what you mean by "safe". I wouldn't entirely trust it with a kid in the house, but it's probably fine for adults. On the other hand, you can make it a bit safer by screwing in a dead bulb (which, like everyone, you'll acquire over time), or one of the edison-base-to-outlet adapters available at hardware stores. I'd consider either of those ...


1

According to the schematic, the B terminal does appear to be connected to the transformer. I'd actually trace the wiring in the unit just to confirm, but based on the schematic it looks good. You'll want to make sure the transformer has enough power to supply the additional load of the new thermostat, but typically it isn't a problem. If you hook up ...


1

Most of the multitude of kill-a-watt type plug-in energy monitors will give cumulative kWh since the monitor was powered-on. The device you link to looks like a whole-household energy monitor. There is a current-sense clamp for each phase of electricity supply into the building. I've used two different models of these types of device and they both gave ...


1

( Do not directly touch anything conductive while doing the following test. ) As a quick check, test if there is voltage between the shield of the coax and the outlet. There should be no DC volts anywhere. The voltage between the coax and the neutral should be very near 0V AC. The voltage between the coax and the hot should be near 120V AC. If both checks ...


1

Something is certainly wired wrong or malfunctioning badly. It could be the cable box. It is less likely to be the cable, but not impossible. Isolate the problem. Disconnect the cable from the cable box, and carefully use a voltmeter to check the voltage between the cable box's output and the TV's input. (The coax connection would be easier to check; ...


1

The core of your question is a standard wiring scenario: You have the hot coming through the load and the switch at the end. Your proposed wiring is correct. Diagrams are easy to find online, e.g., Of course you should be wary of cables (4) and (5): If they are properly terminated in the work box you can leave them. If they are wired into the switch ...


1

Voltage is measured as a difference between two conductors. So if both conductors are the same phase and same voltage from ground, then the effective voltage to the appliance will be 0 volts and it won't turn on. This doesn't mean that the device wouldn't be electrically "hot" since the conductors still have a voltage relative to ground (so you can still ...


1

It will simply not work. You need two different phases/legs to get 208/230/240V. How in the world could you even do this though? 208/240V circuit would require a two-pole breaker so theoretically you cannot wire these circuits with two wires on the same phase.


1

I would first check that the missing hex nut is the same size as nut on one of the two output jacks. This can be done by removing one and seeing if it fits on the jack with the missing nut. This temporarily removed nut can be used as a sample for comparison when buying a new nut. Nuts of this style should be readily available via online retailers such as ...


1

@Aaron, what you propose is fine. Remember, splices inside conduit are not allowed, so your plan to remove the j-box, extend the conduit, and pull new wire is perfect.



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