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7

No, you cannot. Unless you're not covered by National Electrical Code (or similar), you don't care about following codes, or you're also installing a permanent barrier or listed divider. National Electrical Code Chapter 8 Communications Systems. Article 820 Community Antenna Television and Radio Distribution Systems. 820.133 Installation ...


6

I had this same situation. I made a (written) list of issues (with pictures) and gave it to the landlord. When it became clear that the landlord would not fix them, I called an inspector. It turned out that there was a completely different department overseeing residential safety inspection vs. building code inspection, but after getting that sorted, they ...


4

Circuit breakers protect the wiring from overheating and the house from burning down due to electrical fire. The GFCI (RCD) protects you from electrocution. To put it in perspective, a 20 amp circuit breaker can pass 100-200 milliamps (0.1-0.2A) indefinitely, you cannot and are facing heart fibrillation and death if the current takes the right path through ...


3

You should read up on what your legal rights (and responsibilities) are. Most landlord/tenant law in the US is at the state level, but your city and county may have additional rules. Most states have an easy-to-read summary of rental housing laws, and many major cities (including Baltimore, it seems) provide additional protection for tenants. You should also ...


3

Tell your utility to come back out, as it sounds like something in the meter base got undone; either that, or your service drop/lateral's bad. Either way, it's the utility's job to fix.


2

Before National Electrical Code 2014, this was not allowed. However, if your area has adopted the 2014 version of the code, this is now legal as long as both circuits originate from the same panel (250.130(C)(4)). See this answer for more detail.


2

Position the rack so you can screw into the studs. If that is not practical then mount a sheet of decent thickness plywood onto the wall surface and fasten that to the studs wherever possible. The rack can then mount onto the plywood. If you use a plywood that is 3/4' inch (19 or 20mm) thick then the screws for the rack need not even penetrate the drywall at ...


1

I agree it's a little unclear what the right way is. Why don't you try a test. One evening push all the pins one way, run the hot water for a bit to flush some water, then leave it overnight. In the morning if you still have hot water then the heater was on overnight. If you aren't confidant, repeat the same the next night with the pins the other way.


1

Could be a mechanical problem. Try this: with the power OFF, try to rotate the fan with your finger. It should spin freely for awhile after you poke it. If not, then something is mechanically impeding the travel of the fan blades. Check for anything touching any part of that rotating fan assembly. Maybe some left-over protective packaging that you ...


1

With another clockwise fan from the same maker, I was able to reverse the direction by interchanging the yellow and black wires as some answers here indicated. The explanation as I understood is that the rewiring changes the winding with which the capacitor is in series and hence the starting direction is inverted. In 3-phase motors, each of the three ...


1

As Jack said - usually for a light - if you have a light, I'd try to trace the light wiring inside the fixture and find where it broke off of.


1

It connects the house wiring to the light kit if the fan has one, if the fan does not have a light, it does not need it, it is just a spare wire.


1

You are correct that the first two options are allowed by Code (citing from the 2014 NEC here) -- the relevant passage is 210.11(C)(3) along with its Exception: (3) Bathroom Branch Circuits. In addition to the number of branch circuits required by other parts of this section, at least one 120-volt, 20-ampere branch circuit shall be provided to ...


1

You'll use a double pole 20 ampere breaker. It will have two handles that are tied together, and will say "20" on the handles. It should look similar to this... I'm not sure why you're planning to run 10 AWG conductors, but typically 20 ampere circuits only require 12 AWG conductors.


1

IMHO: The number of coils does make a minor difference in the time it takes to heat the burner; on the one with the extra coils, the coil's elements are usually smaller and therefor heat faster and cool faster. The extra turns make up for the smaller coils. You have to look at the ratings of the different coils. Are they the same wattage? Are the ...



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