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5

GU10 sockets are symmetrical: So there is no need to pay attention to where you hook the live and neutral wires, because the lamp can be inserted either way. As the wiring is AC the main reason to wire it up one way or another is for safety considerations. If you are wiring the switch too, put it on the live wire if possible, so that changing the lamp ...


4

Each circuit is rated 20 amperes. Handles are typically tied together when all the breakers are supplying a single piece of equipment. For example, in a 120/240 volt single phase system, two breakers might be tied together for a piece of equipment that requires 240 volts. Three breakers tied together would be common for a 3 phase systems. In all ...


3

A parallel circuit is what you're referring to. In a series circuit, if one connection is broken, the entire circuit is broken.


3

You could theoretically run an infinite number of circuits with a 50A service, provided that no more than 50A is ever drawn at any one time. More practically, if your panel only contains full-width single-pole or double-pole breakers, you may be able to swap out one or more existing breakers in favor of half-width breakers. That would double your ...


3

In response to TDHofstetter's comment, I opened the thermal cutoff: The 14-3 cable (on the bottom of the picture) is coming from the panel. The black wire terminates all by itself (on the left). The red (coming from the same breaker) runs through the cutoff and to the black wire in the armored cable that proceeds to the boiler controller. The ground and ...


3

If that is the red and black from the same 14/3 cable it is anyone's guess why they did this. In any case they are using the same circuit on both wires, obviously. If there is no problem at this time just splice the two wires to a tail of the same gauge and put that one tail on the breaker. Those GE breakers are NOT made to accept two conductors, but it's ...


3

Something is sensitive to fluctuations in voltage. My first guess would be the receiver. Instead of buying a new projector or receiver, buy a power conditioner. This will ensure that your cable box, receiver and projector all receive a constant voltage.


3

There are several reasons for having two-pole breakers, or handle-tied breakers. 240V circuits or multi-wire branch circuits (shared neutral) both require two-pole breakers. The amperage of a breaker is what's on the handle. You DO NOT add up the numbers. A single pole 20A breaker is (for residential in the US at least) a 20A/120V breaker. A two-pole 20A ...


2

3.15A is indeed an appropriate value for a BUSS GMA 5x20mm fuse. Chances are something else is blown out. If you're not up to doing component level troubleshooting, probably a board will have to be replaced. One part that frequently takes the brunt of power surges is MOV (varistor) devices, which look like big (often red or blue) ceramic disk capacitors. ...


2

Almost certainly the ballast, unless old enough to actually have a separate starter, at which point it becomes a tossup between ballast and starter - probably not from 1992. But a 1992 ballast is certainly ripe for replacement 22 years later. They don't live forever. I have a few older ones I have not gotten around to replacing that are very ...


2

Without running an additional switched hot lead, it can be done using radio frequency transmitting switches which control a RF receiver/relay which you would have to wire into the ceiling box. Leviton makes devices like that. They are neither simple nor cheap. In my opinion it would be easier, quicker, and cheaper to fish a new wire or even open the wall. ...


1

A WR GFI uses stainless components and screws. GFI's are notorious for rusting, especially at the mounting screws. The one that went bad was probably older, before WR's were even available. Yes, you need a WR GFI, and an in-use cover. In fact, I'd venture to bet that much of your installation is not up to code. IF it is that close to the pool the receptacle ...


1

The problem may possibly lie in the ballast, the tube(s), or the switch. The simplest initial test is to replace the tube(s) with (a) new one(s) and see if the problem goes away. If so, the problem was in the tube(s). Testing the ballast and the switch is a little more complicated, but made simpler by ensuring that the fixture is equipped with (a) ...



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