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8

No. It's not possible to do what you want, without running additional wires.


8

Using a larger ground conductor is fine. Using a smaller gauge wire for grounding was common in the past, but not correct anymore. The grounding conductor should be at least as large as the other conductors.


5

The rule says that there must be an outlet within 24 inches horizontally from any location along the countertop, so the outlets can be up to 48 inches apart! Think of it as if you have a blender with a 2 ft long cord. Ignoring the height of the outlet, you should be able to plug the blender in anywhere you place it along the counter wall.


5

The text Volts 208/230 Phase 1 means the device will run on either 208 volts or 230 volts (which is nominally 240 volts). In the amps section, the separated numbers (which are the same) are the corresponding value for operation on 208 or 230 volts, respectively.


5

No, in a situation like this absolutely not. The breaker in this case would need to be 15A. Question is, WHY? Why use #14 wire when the circuit is already #12? Stick with what is there and keep the breaker 20A. In some cases, such as in a kitchen, laundry or bath, you'd be creating a violation doing it like you show in that diagram. And don't be confused ...


3

As @Tester101 said, you can't do it just with wiring unless you run new wiring. If you were willing to permanently remove the switch (making the outlet a hot circuit), you could then install a outlet with one unswitched outlet and one switched outlet controlled via carrier-current (X10) or radio protocols, then mount a controller module where you wanted ...


3

I've labeled some things in your photo, that might help you understand what's going on. The wires coming up into the panel are your service conductors, of which you have two "hot" and one "neutral". From there you have "hot" branch-circuit conductors, which are connected through circuit breakers. There's also a branch-circuit "neutral", for each branch ...


2

I am not sure I understand the intent of your question. The neutral wire is not metered. It just passes through the meter box. Old electric meters don't have a connection to it at all. Electric meters monitor both hot legs and add up the kilowatt hours based on current flow through those. photo source. The only remarkable thing I see in your photo is ...


1

Remember that power runs from source, thru meter, to breaker box. That isn't power to meter, it's power FROM meter (two phases, red and black). It makes perfect sense to me that neutral too would be drawn from the main box thru the meter box to the apartment box. I don't see anything questionable here.


1

The wires themselves don't have polarity, that only exists within an outlet based on it being wired correctly, or reversed (hot/neutral reversed). So essentially you just need to identify the hot wires and the neutral wires, and if you maintain this correctly throughout all of the wiring and correctly wire up your outlets, then polarity will be correct. ...


1

If your basement is even somewhat functional then I would try to wire to the attic. I think a good rule of thumb would be would you let your out of work cousin stay in your basement a few days? If it is even that nice I would go for the attic, given that you can reasonably get to almost all areas of your attic. Remember for bedrooms with outer walls that ...


1

Rewiring a house is an advanced activity; you have to understand what is code and what is reasonable, and then understand how to get wire to the places where you need to get wire. This will probably involve damage to some finished surfaces. I would not go the baseboard route, as it doesn't look very good and you would need to protect the wire against nails. ...


1

In most cases, yes - just look for line conditioning as a feature. Our municipal electric supply is notoriously bad with voltage fluctuations, so I have the vast majority of my electronics running through either a UPS or a line conditioner. Unless your intention is to have a battery back-up, you might be able to get a dedicated line conditioner with ...


1

Are you sure you need a voltage stabilizer? Generally, with modern electronics, the power supply itself will filter out most line noise you're likely to encounter on reasonably modern wiring. (I have seen an Uninterruptable Power Supply pressed into service as a line conditioner, in an old hotel where line voltage could suddenly drop well below 90VAC. So ...


1

I personally wouldn't go this route, as it would definitely be a "hope it works" situation. For starters, I would hesitate to drill through stud bays that I didn't have access to both sides of because there is really no way to be sure you wouldn't be drilling through something important, like existing wiring for example. Second, drilling the holes is only ...


1

Neutral to ground should never read 120V. This means your neutral connection back to the breaker/fuse box has gotten disconnected somehow. That needs to be found and fixed.


1

Yes, but you MUST cut in old work device boxes first. You CANNOT simply install standard receptacles in the holes in the walls. Here is an example:


1

This is where reading the actual wording of the code is useful. National Electrical Code 2014 Chapter 2 Wiring and Protection Article 210 Branch Circuits III Required Outlets 210.52 Dwelling Unit Receptacle Outlets (C) Coutertops (1) Wall Countertop Spaces. A receptacle outlet shall be installed at each wall countertop space ...



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