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8

The trap doors serve a few purposes in plastic boxes: They keep stuff in. Sparks, flames, and other rogue electrical gremlins. They keep stuff out. Fingers, pets, or anything else capable of getting electrocuted or causing a short. They act as the cable clamps for non-metallic cables entering the electrical box. Fire proof foam or caulk would likely ...


4

I would avoid any interference with a load-bearing beam (which you do well to point out). Drilling holes -or space for a receptacle- will surely make it more fragile. Instead of that, the option of switching the switches from one side of the wall to the opposite side may be attractive. Basically, you would need to disconnect and take out the switches from ...


3

There's no technical reason that he can't move the boxes. It would certainly be more elegant. My best guess is that your electrician doesn't like drywall repair/ painting. If the ceiling is textured, that's a strong disincentive, as matching texture is hard. He'll definitely save you money with his approach.


3

You'd have to remove the bonding jumper, and install a separate grounding bar. Notice in this image, there are clearly separate grounding bars installed.


3

Yes, that is precisely correct. Though I prefer red tape, but that's a preference, not a requirement to go buy a roll. Nicer (IMHO) because you can easily mark switched hots whether they be black or white.


3

It doesn't sound like the #14 and #12 grounding wires being connected is the issue, to me. EDIT: NEC 250.148 (C) Metal Boxes. A connection shall be made between the one or more equipment grounding conductors and a metal box by means of a grounding screw that shall be used for no other purpose, equipment listed for grounding, or a listed grounding ...


3

Lighting branches didn't require grounds back then, so that probably explains why your closet was left ungrounded (I'm assuming there's no receptacles in there). My house was built in 1987 and I've fought a few ground battles on lighting circuits as well. There should be no issue connecting your grounds. It's possible that your ground's continuity is broken ...


2

According to National Electrical Code, the water piping must be bonded to the service equipment enclosure, the grounded conductor at the service (service "neutral"), the grounding electrode conductor (where large enough), or directly to one or more of the grounding electrodes. The bonding jumper is to be sized using Table 250.66. For 200 ampere service, ...


2

The old boxes in their current location will be decommissioned. Whether they get caps, or are removed and the holes patched over is an aesthetic question and up to you (as @Kris says). Since you have access from the attic, you have two choices as expressed in your question leave existing wire and boxes connected, shift them, and add wiring and a third box ...


2

At least one of the tabs on the old 1/2 switched outlet (the hot side) must have been snapped off, or it couldn't be 1/2 switched, it would have to be all switched. You describe only 3 wires (2 whites + one red), but there should be 2 non-white wires: one always-hot wire for the unswitched side of the outlet (should be black), and one switched hot wire ...


1

In general, this is a sign of a circuit loaded a bit too heavily. After an outage, everything is starting at once - motor loads, in particular, tend to draw a very large current at startup - if a circuit has several motor loads which do not usually start at the same time, it may not trip in normal service, but if all the motor loads start at the same time, ...


1

14in light is a useless figure. What you're looking for is lumens. ("Replaces a X watt incandescent" is also useful, though affected by marketing a bit.) Get a target lumen value, then get a lighting setup that meets this value. LEDs vs fluorescents doesn't matter for getting enough light, just for power-saving purposes. Before you replaced the lights, was ...


1

You need 4 wires for a subpanel (neutral and ground separated) - as such, 6AWG is all that fits - 4 AWG would require 1" conduit at a minimum (even for 3 wires.) I don't keep this in my head - I use this, or one like it: http://www.electrician2.com/calculators/rf_calculator.html


1

You can buy connectors made specifically to join stranded and unstranded wires For example Wago lighting connectors can be used in nearly all electrical connections where a connection between solid and fine-stranded conductors is required for household and similar purposes in buildings. Applications can be, for example, automated blinds or awnings, ...



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