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4

That beeping puts me in mind of the beeping you get from a smoke detector that has a low battery. Are you absolutely certain it's the fixture? If so, look for some kind of battery backup - maybe there's a night-light function, or a wireless remote or something? Or a built in smoke detector I suppose is a possibility. Anyway - find that and change the ...


3

I've labeled some things in your photo, that might help you understand what's going on. The wires coming up into the panel are your service conductors, of which you have two "hot" and one "neutral". From there you have "hot" branch-circuit conductors, which are connected through circuit breakers. There's also a branch-circuit "neutral", for each branch ...


3

Yes, that's exactly what you should do. As a safety measure, while you've got the wiring exposed, double check that the hot (black and red) wires are connected to the brass-colored screw on the receptacle, the neutral (white) is connected to the silver-colored screw, and the ground is connected to the green screw.


2

The wires themselves don't have polarity, that only exists within an outlet based on it being wired correctly, or reversed (hot/neutral reversed). So essentially you just need to identify the hot wires and the neutral wires, and if you maintain this correctly throughout all of the wiring and correctly wire up your outlets, then polarity will be correct. ...


2

In a perfect world, with perfect electronics, there would be no need for a grounding conductor. It's there to deal with imperfections. The most likely case for a ground fault in this installation would be if the black conductor lost some insulation and shorted itself against the frame of the fan. In such a situation, the casing could become electrified, ...


2

Before you terminate and dead end the red wire in the box there a couple of things to consider. Since there are obviously two hots providing power to a split outlet (i.e. tab removed) it does NOT necessarily mean that half the outlet is switched. It could just be that two separate circuits supply power from two circuit breakers. The red wire may come from ...


1

The system is designed to dial out on a phone line to a central station or a police monitoring system. These alarms have built in warnings for a failure in the phone line. This is a safeguard so you know the system is not working properly. So long as the system is operational and cut off from the phone line, it will continue to beep. By removing parts of ...


1

NO. You CANNOT extend this kitchen receptacle circuit to feed lighting. Both Canada (I believe) and the US have restrictions on this. You must find a different source to feed this lighting load. If you are removing it altogether then I would say it is probably OK, but WHY are you removing it? There is a very real chance you are creating a different violation ...


1

The third insulated conductor is only called a "traveler" in the context of a three way switch (when two light switches control the same lights). In this context, the third conductor is just another hot. Usually, when two hots are connected to an outlet like that, the break-away tab is removed, and one outlet is always on while the other is switched. (the ...


1

I know when the home I live in now was built (mid 60's) grounding was not required for lighting circuits in my area. The electrician that wired the house actually pulled the grounding wires back out of the box (non-metallic) and bound them together behind the box. So none of my lights or switches in the house are grounded. It would be safer to have the ...


1

You can purchase and utilize a common DPDT type relay (Double Pole / Double Throw) to create a cross over switch. It is pretty easy to understand from the following relay diagram: You connect one circuit to the two NC (normally closed) terminals of the relay. The other circuit connects to the two COM (common) terminals. Then you add two additional wires ...


1

If your basement is even somewhat functional then I would try to wire to the attic. I think a good rule of thumb would be would you let your out of work cousin stay in your basement a few days? If it is even that nice I would go for the attic, given that you can reasonably get to almost all areas of your attic. Remember for bedrooms with outer walls that ...


1

Rewiring a house is an advanced activity; you have to understand what is code and what is reasonable, and then understand how to get wire to the places where you need to get wire. This will probably involve damage to some finished surfaces. I would not go the baseboard route, as it doesn't look very good and you would need to protect the wire against nails. ...


1

In most cases, yes - just look for line conditioning as a feature. Our municipal electric supply is notoriously bad with voltage fluctuations, so I have the vast majority of my electronics running through either a UPS or a line conditioner. Unless your intention is to have a battery back-up, you might be able to get a dedicated line conditioner with ...


1

Are you sure you need a voltage stabilizer? Generally, with modern electronics, the power supply itself will filter out most line noise you're likely to encounter on reasonably modern wiring. (I have seen an Uninterruptable Power Supply pressed into service as a line conditioner, in an old hotel where line voltage could suddenly drop well below 90VAC. So ...



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