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17

I'm sorry, but from the tone of your question, and the fact that you even suggest plugging this motor into a regular 15A receptacle tells me you are so far over your head your only valid option is to hire a pro to wire this. This is NOT a simple DIY job and you cannot simply ask questions to get every little detail out of an internet message board to do this ...


6

The NEC simply states "where supplied through a ground-fault circuit interrupter" in this instance, so you can achieve this either by a GFI receptacle, a faceless GFI device, or a GFI breaker. You cannot however use an AFCI breaker, unless it is one of the new (and rare) AFCI/GFCI breakers. Good luck finding one though. I find one Siemens on Amazon and ...


5

While that might work, I doubt your HOA would allow grooving the ceiling because the concrete is part of the common structure. Instead, install flat conduit. Or flatwire. Or maybe you might like a beam which could conceal a wire.


4

I assume you are in the USA. The heater is probably a pure 240V load with no need for the neutral (white) wire. you should simply cap the white wire with a wire nut and tuck it back into the electrical box.


4

My understanding is that I need a 1 phase(household) to three phase converter to do this. Yes. Usually these are used if you need to control the speed, torque, or another aspect of the motor. If you just need a constant 1750 RPM with a max 1HP, then you can purchase a single phase AC motor that doesn't require a converter. If you need to control the ...


4

Another alternative would be to fur out the ceiling and install a drywall ceiling on top of your existing ceiling. This would give you an area to run new, concealed wiring. Another benefit to this is that you wouldn't need to scrape the existing ceiling which can be really messy (not to mention a lot of work), and you will need to mud/tape and paint ...


3

If this receptacle you are referring to is serving the kitchen counter you CANNOT use that to feed a disposal. Kitchen counter circuits cannot be used to feed fixed appliances. You will need to run a new feed to the disposal, preferably a dedicated circuit from the panel.


3

The GFCI for the circuit might be in a bathroom. Check the GFCI's in the house as one might be feeding the kitchen (which should be on GFCI)


3

Calculating the total wattage using Ohm's law is quite simple. Watts = Volts (V or E) * Current (A or I) Therefore Watts = 240 Volts * 20 Amperes = 4800 Watts However, if you live in the US (and possibly Canada has similar rules) and follow National Electrical Code, you're not quite done yet. 424.3(B) says that fixed electric space-heating equipment ...


3

The loss of electrical power described in the question may be symptomatic of potentially serious issues that might result in fire and/or injurious or fatal electri shock. It needs prompt attention from a person competent to analyze and work on residential electrical systems. Hiring a licensed electrician is strongly recommended as a general recommendation. ...


2

Pretty simple question that seems to have gotten out of hand. I believe the OP was trying to fix or modify a work bench like this one, pictured. These would be the correct off-the-shelf parts... pretty legit if you ask me. Good luck finding a non-Decora GFCI for it, no wonder they needed a seprate GFCI.


2

The maximum breaker size is determined by the wire size—not the type of outlet. It is okay to install a smaller rated breaker than the wire can carry, though that may be confusing to future owners. For example, 10 gauge copper normally has a 30 amp breaker. However, it is perfectly fine to use a 25, 20, 15, or even a 10 amp breaker on 10 gauge. ...


2

Yes, it is safe. NO, it is not what you should do. The proper fix for this is to find out why the GFI is tripping. It is doing it's job and you need to find out why.


2

It looks a bit of an unusual setup, but I'll hazard a guess that there is either a further light on the circuit either fed from one of the switches or the power from the circuit is fed in at a switch and feeds on from here to another light (or lights). (Obviously, you need to verify this, as we can't tell how it's wired from just one photograph). From left ...


2

Your panel is a 12/24, so every space can have a tandem or even quad breaker. That's what 12 space, 24 circuit means. In the panel schedule you may even see a line or dotted line through the middle of each breaker space. A single 20A breaker can certainly have all that on it, but the question is should it? It all depends on what you will be running ...


2

I'm going to volunteer that yes, there is much more it than knowing AutoCAD.


1

As long as the existing cable has a grounding conductor what you propose is absolutely fine, although you must replace the breaker with the proper two-pole 20A breaker. Although not required I would definitely place a label on the wire in the panel stating it is to be used for a 20A circuit maximum. I would place the 10/3 in a box and branch off with two ...


1

There are ceiling pull-chain switches sometimes used in the UK for bathroom lights, for historical reasons. I don't know how available they would be in the US. Since you're just switching a lamp, you could get a metal blank switchplate, drill a hole in it, and install a lamp- or fan-type pull-chain switch in the wall box.


1

If the dimmer itself is buzzing my suggestion is to replace the dimmer. I would only use a high quality dimmer like Lutron, Cooper, or a higher end Leviton. Also don't get a rotary dimmer. Many cheap rotary dimmers are low quality with little filtering.


1

I would use a 6x6x4 junction box and mount the relay to the back with Tek (drill point) screws. This should give you plenty of room for wiring and terminations.


1

OK, first of all, plainly this is a mess. The fact that there is a white wire hooked up to a black wire without any recolouring of it alone says that (1) there's some amateurish stuff going on here, and (2) you cannot trust any of the white wires to actually be neutral until you prove that they are. So proceed cautiously, and take notes as you go. There ...


1

No. The bare copper wire is the grounding conductor, and it should be connected to the circuits grounding conductor. If there is no grounded "neutral" conductor coming from the cooktop, you should cap the white wire off. The grounded "neutral" conductor is only used for 120 Volt or 120/240 Volt circuits, and is not required for straight 240 Volt circuits ...


1

I don't know the details of that system, but that certainly is not "how they all work". The box outside should only be an intercom in the one you've shown us. If there was a keypad to unlock the door, that would only send key-press signals rather than connecting directly to the latch. The wire which operates the latch should NOT be exposed. Either you're ...


1

This is possible using standard electrical wiring devices! You will need (in addition to standard electrician's tools and supplies): Three three-way switches (switches 2, 3, and 4) A four-way switch such as a Leviton CSB4-15T or equivalent (linking for the sake of those who have never bumped into one, a good home improvement store should have one kicking ...


1

Start troubleshooting with any recent fixture, switch, or outlet work on that circuit. Then trace the problem circuit from the main box outward removing every junction faceplate and inspecting. Jiggle and twist connections while looking for issues. It may be resolved just by a few turns here and there.



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