Hot answers tagged

5

PAT test labels have no legal protection in the UK. There is no legal reason to stop any person purchasing PAT test labels. Portable Appliance Testing is not mandated in UK law. In many situations (e.g. a typical office) simple visual inspection every two or three years may be adequate. This can be done by any unqualified person. If desired by management, ...


5

So what happened? Well, the rule with all things electrical is, they work right up until they don't. With a small transformer like that, it is likely if it overloaded it could burn a wire in half thus failing open. Apparently, you have a basic voltage tester so you can test for continuity (or resistance) on the primary side (240v) of the transformer, ...


5

I would use the cable to feed a small sub-panel. Then you can feed your new circuits from that. This gives you a lot of flexibility. Where was the hot tub? Where is this cable exactly?


5

Try using an 11b extension ring or a 1900 extension ring. Actually made to deepen a junction box, but should work for this application.


4

In North America equipment grounding conductors (circuit grounds) can be much smaller than circuit conductors. In fact it's only the first few circuit sizes (up to 30A) that require the EGC to be the same size as the circuit conductors. In the US, grounding conductors are sized according to the NEC Table 250.122.


4

The 2014 NEC now requires the dishwasher to be on GFCI. The 2014 NEC does not require the dishwasher to be on an individual circuit (it never has). So, you could feed either receptacle on the load side of the other with a GFCI. Or you could put the whole circuit on a GFCI breaker. If your locality is still on the 2011 NEC the GFCI requirement was not in ...


4

Both can be a reason. If you overload an electric motor it will draw more than the rated value causing the breaker to trip. The second reason is excessive length of a small cord can cause a large voltage drop browning out the motor causing higher than normal current. A 15A breaker is only truly rated for 12A with a continuous load (more than 3 hours) or ...


4

I will all but guaranty you the wires are not aluminum, but tinned copper. Look at the cut ends of the conductors, not the stripped part. Tell us what you find.


4

With a 120/240V single split-phase system, there are two possible outcomes. Separate legs If the branch circuits feeding the device are on separate legs of the service, then the tab will be creating a direct short-circuit between the legs. This will cause a high current through the circuits, which should trip one of the breakers fairly quickly. Same ...


3

Bottom line: The breaker MUST be sized to be equal to or less than what the wire permits in ADDITION to what the manufacture of the appliance says to use.* The breaker can NOT be greater than what the wire permits. Period. #10 gauge size wire is sized for at most 30 Amps. Therefore, at most a 30A breaker should be used. Most washers require no ...


3

You need a "switch dummy". Also commonly called a "switch blank", "blank insert" and "blank filler". The big box stores may not carry this item, if not, electrical supply house should have available.


3

Electricity follows every available path back to the source. If you connect neutral to ground, you're putting current on the grounding conductor. This includes conduit, boxes, device chassis, enclosures, bare (uninsulated) wire, etc. If a person comes into contact with any of those devices, they can become a path as well. This can lead to injury, and/or ...


3

We're not on the Code Golf SE, but let's play anyway. (code golf is a game of making the shortest possible program, with no regard for whether it is understandable.) Overcurrent protection is provided by plain 15A and 20A breakers listed for reverse flow. The GFCI works in the normal direction and it takes care of GFCI only. I don't know how the ...


2

As it sounds like it's an electronically commutated motor (ECM). My advice is to grab the control board, blower, and transformer out of the furnace. Then connect everything up as it was in the furnace. You should then be able to use the R and G thermostat terminals, to turn the fan on and off. You will have to bypass any limit circuits on the board, but ...


2

The most likely failure point here is the GFCI's. #2 is the switch. Then the wire-nuts. Lastly, the wire. Since the switch is not involved, I'd try temporarily replacing the GFCI outlet with a quality plain outlet. Buy quality, preferably one which uses the screws to clamp down on the wire, similar to the way it appears your GFCI grabs the wires. ...


2

Yes, most larger "whole-house" units require two or even three circuits. Problem is most of those require two or three 40, 50 or even 60 amp circuits. You will have to do some research to find one that will supply your needs but only requires three 30A circuits. I will say, don't get your hopes up.


2

For a typical 240V tank style water heater you will need a 30A/240V circuit. No neutral is required. You CAN use the white wire as a hot going to the breaker for a straight 240V circuit such as this. You just need to mark it as a hot conductor with a permanent marker or such. You can use any typical hot color such as black, red or blue. You DO NOT need to ...


2

A cellphone charger is an inconsequential load. The lamp would also be inconsequential if you'd put LED bulbs in it. The laptop certainly uses less than 10% of the circuit's capacity, maybe even 3-5%. A blow dryer is a huge load, and takes 80% of a circuit's capacity. A heater is also a huge load that takes 80% of a circuit's capacity. Those two ...


2

The risk of a bootleg ground is that grounded devices can become energized and potentially lethal to touch should the neutral connection ever fail or simply have too high of a resistance. To give a sample scenario, suppose you have an electric heater on a circuit that uses a bootleg ground. And downstream of that bootleg, the neutral goes through an old ...


2

I'd have no concerns about doing so assuming the exterior outlet is a GFCI and it's fairly well protected from the elements. Even if it does get wet and trip the dishwasher will remain in service. I'm not aware of any codes that this would violate, but I'm not a NEC encyclopedia like some of our members.


2

If this truly was a split receptacle, where each receptacle was fed by a separate circuit. Then you'll have to either install two GFCI breakers/receptacles, or cap off one of the feeds. To my knowledge, there are no multi-circuit GFCI receptacle devices available on the market.


2

Others have discussed the code requirements, so I'll answer from a physics point of view: The only real concern is that some models of dishwasher use a significant amount of power. As such, if you're planning to use the outdoor socket for more than light-duty work when the washer is running, the circuit may not have enough capacity for your needs. If it's ...


2

I would open up the receptacle box if possible to see what's going on, but the only way I can think that these readings would be plausible would be if the outlet neutral is not connected to a neutral conductor going back to the panel but is instead shorted to H1. That would produce the readings you've recorded. And if your old stove didn't use the neutral ...


2

Something is terribly, shockingly awry here. The only way you can get these measurements is if the line marked H1 and the line marked N are shorted together -- but normally, that'd trip the breaker. So, either you have an open neutral somewhere upstream of what's shorting H1 to N, or worse yet, you have a circuit breaker that is managing to not trip when ...


2

In an ideal world -- these would be identical, and from a purely electrical standpoint, they basically are. But, we live in the real world, where connections have parasitic resistance and badly made connections can do naughty things while in the process of falling apart due to vibrations etal. The heatshrunk-over splice can be very good or very bad -- a ...


2

Transformers are pretty rugged and it's unlikely it would have burned up without some kind of burning insulation smell. If it has gone, the unit is not worth repairing. I would suspect the rocker switch has failed. There may also be an internal fuse of some kind. This thing looks like a Chinese-made device that may have dubious quality components. Even so, ...


2

As long as the cable is in good condition, there's no problem with using it. However, using 8 AWG cable to feed general lighting, will be troublesome. You could use it to supply a panel, which in turn could be used to supply the lighting.


2

Look closely at that light switch. See the two switch blocks (one blank) and the almost-square translucent fringe around both of them? That lights up. That is a backlight designed to help you find it in the dark. You may have known this and forgot to mention it, or maybe it doesn't work for a particular reason. Here is how those switches are wired ...


2

It's worse than tester101 says. Each circuit may not see half, there may be an imbalance of currents between the redundant paths. (Especially if one has a problem, such as being completely broken). Now how are the wires protected from overload? The hots have rather nice breakers on them, but the neutrals are not breaker protected! Nothing will detect an ...


1

Trim kits for "can lights" (recessed lights) are sold separately. The box stores have them or you can find them online. Like this one here. For a shower/tub enclosure you need a trim kit rated for wet locations. It will have the gasket and springs like the old one. Take the old one to the store with you to make sure you get the right size. They come in 4, ...



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