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15

A breaker will trip according to its trip curve, at 40°C (104°F). In this condition, it should be able to carry 100% of the rated load. So if you have a 20 ampere breaker, at 40°C it should be able to carry 20 amperes. It's often recommended (and sometimes required), to only load a circuit to 80% its capacity. In most cases, devices are listed ...


8

If the breaker is working properly, you're simply overloading the circuit. If the breaker is tripping well below the rated load, it's in need of replacement. If it happens to be not merely older, but also one of the "dubious models" (such as Federal Pacific) the whole breaker panel should be replaced before something bad happens (they have a tendency to ...


7

Get yourself a Kill-a-Watt power meter and measure each of your loads on each circuit. They also make upscale units with backlights and storage so you can unplug it and look at the stored data in a bit more comfort. Take Watts or VA (whichever is larger) and divide by 120 - this gives Amps. Or take "amps" right off the Kill-a-Watt. Tally up all the ...


6

You should never, EVER put a space heater (or other high-draw appliance) on a plug strip!! Even thought they are rated for a certain amperage or wattage, most are cheaply made and cannot handle the load of a single high-draw appliance. It's not that they will definitely fail, but unfortunately your experience is not at all uncommon. What happened to yours ...


6

If a breaker is tripping regularly, that's a serious problem you should look at. That is not normal or acceptable. It means something is wrong with your overcurrent protection, or a defective device actually drawing too much current. It is normal for circuit breakers to allow overcurrent for a short amount of time. This is needed by motors to start, ...


4

A 50hz motor will spin approximately 20% faster and draw approximately 20% more than the rated power. Increasing frequency can cause over heating and if the motor is pushing a substantial load the core is not large enough to prevent a cascade failure before you see the magic smoke being released. Many motors are dual rated and can handle the difference but ...


4

Yes, PVC conduit is nice stuff. Make sure to keep water from entering it, or it'll just turn into a swimming pool. You'll be using single wires in conduit, just like most commercial buildings. You need wire marked for wet locations. There are many grades of wire, but what I find on store shelves is THHN or THWN - the latter has the "W" wet rating. The ...


4

If you get hum in audio electronics, it's almost certainly not the result of a poor electrical system ground. In fact, if your electrical system grounding conductors were all well-bonded but not grounded at all, your stereo would still be perfectly happy. There are several much more likely potential sources for hum, mostly due to defective power supply ...


3

Breakers do not trip right away. Whether they trip depends on how far over their rated capacity the current is and how long the current has been going for. This behavior is documented in a circuit breaker trip curve for your specific breakers, which gives a range of times for a specific current amount. E.g. in that example, a current of 3x the rated current ...


2

If touching doorknobs produces a shock, that doesn't sound like a ground fault, since doorknobs are never grounded. I think the hint might be that its started happening since the AC was fixed. With the AC working, the relative humidity in the house would have been reduced, perhaps to the point that static generation and consequent shocks are produced. ...


2

For the LDR 530 2165TL LED Faucet Aerator they explain that it: Runs entirely on the water stream pressure from your faucet - no batteries required On another LED Light Water Faucet they show the impeller: And here they explain: There is a small dynamo with impeller inside the faucet. When you turn on the faucet, the impeller will start to move ...


2

Qu 1: What is the best way to extend the existing double socket to add 3 extra sockets. You want to increase the total load from 15A to >27A. You probably don't want the breaker tripping if you, for example, run the washer and dryer at the same time. If the existing circuit is really a radial circuit with a dedicated breaker in the CU you will need to ...


2

You are correct. And if that interests you, I encourage you to innovate in that area. All the things you listed are extremely small loads, smaller than 10 watts. Many of them want 12 volts DC directly. You would not be wrong to put a second 12V electrical system in your house that runs those small loads. Those would include the following, and also ...


2

This looks like a 3-way slide dimmer. In the first picture it looks like there are five wires. Two black, two blue and one white(?). Is that correct? Can't tell what the white(s) is(are) connected to, if at all. Just looking at the pictures(which are leaving out some needed information) and seeing that these are 4-square boxes, the box in the second ...


2

You may have tried this already but your first step is to use a circuit tester to make sure you have power coming to the white and black wires. If not, your next step is to walk backwards from the light to troubleshoot. If you made the correct connections at the light then go to the switch and verify that the switch is indeed wired to the line the light is ...


1

You didn't say where you live, but the National Electrical Code applies to most areas of the USA. Check your state and local codes for any modification to this. The NEC is clear on this subject. If the re-bar is not connected by tie wires to the rest of the re-bar and is less than 20 feet long you will need another grounding electrode. It also needs to be ...


1

Interesting. In Canada the cable you need exists (2 conductor 12 or 10 AWG, red and black jackets, with bare ground), is commonly used to wire baseboard heaters at 240V and 20A, and can be found at any HomeDepot. The cable is even made in USA! See here for 12 AWG: https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.electrical-cable--copper-electrical-wire-gauge-122---romex-...


1

You are allowed to use a white wire for a hot wire, but you need to mark it with tape at both ends. The tape can be any color besides white, gray, green or copper, as those denote other things. If you want to be fancy and use wire natively colored the official colors, use 10/3. Wire-nut or tape the unused neutral. If your heater is 16 amps or ...


1

If the house is detached you still need ground rods or a concrete encased electrode. You didn't answer ThreePhaseEel's second question. Either way, The ground wire gets attached to the ground bar. All grounds and neutrals are kept separate on their own bars. The green bonding screw for the panel is NOT installed. Discard it. There are several other ...


1

Get a push-on wire splice. Cut a 16 inch piece of 12 gauge bare copper wire. Stick the wire in to the splice and bend it back 180 degrees like it's making a U-turn. Release the two ground wires in the box from the screws, bend them out, and push the splice on to both wires at the same time. And now you can bend your new ground wire under one of the ground ...


1

The green wire does need to connect to one of the two grounding screws in the box. To completely comply with code practice, you would only place one wire under each grounding screw, but unfortunately the previous electrician has cut off the ground wires of the existing cables too short to pigtail a wire connector to them. You could try loosening the cable ...


1

Keith, You can fish in a new wire under the cement. I have done this quite a few times using a 1/2" stick of PVC pipe connected to a water hose. Dig a small trench next to the cement slightly deeper if larger compacted rock was used some times it it is easier to go below the rock. Connect the PVC to a garden hose and start drilling your hole by pushing into ...


1

You would not use the existing good sprinkler wires to bring the 120VAC out to the valve box. The wires are not rated and approved for that type of use. Place the converter transformer indoors to step the 120VAC down to the 24VAC. The "good" wires could then be used to route the 24VAC outdoors. I would not use the sprinkler timer in the valve box. It would ...


1

Your dimmer is miswired in two ways. First, your house is wired using metal conduit instead of NM cable. This has a few upsides: You can add more wires to the conduits if you need to Everything is wrapped in nice, grounded metal -- no need to worry about nailing through an electrical wire! You can use whatever colors you want for "hot" wires save for ...


1

Looking at the Installation Instructions, if you bought the 3-way version then you either miswired it, or tried to install it in place of one of the 4-way switches previously in the circuit. The 3-way dimmer must be at one end or the other of the circuit. (if you bought a single pole aka 2-way, then it'll never work). This little pic shows the layout. ...


1

220v to a well pump is AC. Such a high voltage delivered to a home would never be DC. In fact, DC of any voltage, except low voltage lighting for example, in a home would be rare; maybe unheard of.


1

Sum up the wattage of all the appliances plugged into the circuit and divide by the voltage. That will be the total amp they will draw in the worst case not accounting for motor starting loads which can peak above that. If the breaker is rated for more than that then it's probably gone bad and needs a replacement. If the draw is more than the breaker is ...


1

The clearance is 36" in front and 30" side-to-side -- but that side-to-side clearance does not have to be centered on the panel as long as both edges are accessible. Graphically, originally from Mike Holt:


1

To answer your biggest question: I'm pretty sure it's not code-legal to tap into the feed from your meter panel with split-bolt connections. It's possible that your breaker panel has some lugs near the bottom of the load side bus bars to connect a feed to a subpanel, but most don't. So a possible solution is what Doxy suggests: a new 100A panel that feeds ...


1

A non-code issue is: Best not to put panels behind locked interior doors. Someone may see an emerging electrical fire, and stop it immediately by shutting off the breaker NOW. People can self-help with routine trips - for instance whoops, the break-room toaster and microwave shouldn't be run together. You don't want to pay an electrician to twiddle ...



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