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8

Check with your utility to see if they have a program to bury your service line. My company (FPL) has a program where they will give you the conduit to bury along with instructions. Once everything is set up and meets their standards, they will bring the lines down the pole for you. There is a fee, of course. For FPL in my area, it would cost around $580 ...


5

NO! Regular couplings, those in the first image, are NOT pull points. Pull points are conduit bodies or boxes, or even those silly little elbows in the second image. My suggestion would be to install a conduit body at strategic locations. For your installation you really only need one. Conduit bodies:


5

The usual official blessed method here is to replace the whole cable. Odds are excellent that your mower manual says that. So, officially and for maximum safety, that is what you should do. If you are going to do otherwise, you need both a better repair method and to isolate the functions of the repair - part one being the strain relief or physical end to ...


4

The short answer is that the breaker protects the wire (otherwise, heat and fire can result). You can put a 20A breaker on a circuit if all the wire on the circuit is #12. If any of the wire is #14 you can put a 15A breaker on it. If any of the wire in the circuit is smaller than #14, then you cannot put a 15A breaker on it.


4

Alright there are two options. 1.Either your light was fed power from the panel (or a plug etc...) first. OR The light switch box was fed power first and your light has two cables in it because it goes to another light after that one. You need to first figure out where your strait hot power is coming in from. I understand that you believe you have ...


2

It doesn't sound like a short. It happens after five minutes... each time. To me it also sounds like loose wiring or a bad breaker. I would turn the circuit off and than I would visually inspect the back of the receptacle first. Are the screws tight? Any burnt looking wires anywhere in the box? Than if that is good I would switch that breaker out for a ...


2

There is obviously something wrong, and I highly doubt it is the breaker. You can view the wiring in the panel by turning off the main breaker and unscrewing the cover plate. You will see something like this: As you can see, there is not much opportunity for a short, however, if the wires are touching somehow and burnt, then it could be a short. You could ...


2

Conduit it typically mounted and strapped so you can not readily separate the joints shown in the first picture. Pull points would mean a way to pull the with without separating the joints of the conduit themselves. Do it right the first time and make it easy on you or anyone else who has to work on it later.


2

When you reset the breaker were you sure to first go to the off and than on position? When a breaker trips it goes into the trip position which is centre on the handle. But to reset it, you need to go to move the handle to the off position and than the opposite way to the ON position. Sometimes people forget to go off first and just try to go from tripped to ...


2

You can do what you want, as long as... The box remains accessible. The box is fitted with a proper cover. That being said, it may be more appropriate to make the splice in an existing box (assuming the box is large enough for the additional conductors).


1

Moving the main service to the garage is probably the most practical option if an easement for full underground is impossible. You will almost certainly need to change the feed wire between the garage and the house for that approach, but that's similar to what you would need to do for an underground feed anyway. Probably most practical to actually establish ...


1

Since you are pulling in conduit, you don't need a full blown box for this job. Simply use an appropriately sized, weatherproof conduit body (a Type C is what you want, by the way) made from the same material as your conduit. However, you will need to use the 314.28(A)(2) rule that the body must be no shorter than six times the distance from the entrance ...


1

What can I do to strengthen the cable? Is there something I can do to make sure that the two cable parts stay together? You can use a product intended for the purpose. Note strain relief clamps at each end. As most prior answers have pointed out, generally it is better to replace the cable.


1

For a quick & temporary fix, tie a knot around the spliced portion. That will prevent there from being any tension on the splice. (You can also use a knot to take the strain off of multiple extension cords that are connected). But seriously, just replace the power cable.


1

Locate the serviceable junction immediately upstream of nonfunctional outlet. Establish which wires go to defective socket. Switch off house mains and make safe. Disconnect these upstream wires at the junction. Disconnect downstream defective socket. Using a long length of bell wire, attach it to the disconnected wiring at upstream junction, and bring the ...


1

There may be an in-ceiling connector as well as the connections which are certainly in the tape, but if you cannot pull a connector down by gently pulling on the wires, and if you cannot access the ceiling space, then the following will work. (1) BEST: Get somebody competent to assist or to do the job - you have less chance of dying that way. Otherwise: ...



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