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18

I'm sorry, but from the tone of your question, and the fact that you even suggest plugging this motor into a regular 15A receptacle tells me you are so far over your head your only valid option is to hire a pro to wire this. This is NOT a simple DIY job and you cannot simply ask questions to get every little detail out of an internet message board to do this ...


12

Motors dont break... the brushes used to power the coils or the golden fingers used to get the power are for sure worn out and needs replacing.. This can be a difficult task sometimes and these parts could cost $50-- so by replacing the motor of an equivalent type you should expect the same life span based on the usage of the machine. In this picture you ...


12

Do I just replace hot/neutral with hot/hot? Absolutely not! You have a vital step to complete before you can do that. Note that the bottom picture would have been a little better if you had pulled the cord up so we could see the numbers on the white plastic block. In this motor, you are working with two sets of wires, the electrical cord and a pair ...


10

Lots of things can be wrong with your garage door or opener: It could be something as simple as needing to replace the springs. If they are torsion springs, you're going to want to consult a professional, as they can store a deadly amount of tension. Consider it as dangerous as electric repairs. Some garage door openers operate on battery. You might need ...


9

Check the fine print To find out if the dimmer can work with the fan, you'll have to inspect the dimmer. For this, you'll have to remove the cover plate and possibly pull the switch out of the box (in which case, make sure you shut off the power at the breaker). If you see the text "For Incandescent Only"; or something similar, you should not use this ...


9

Okay, so I think I figured out the reason, and I learned a lot about HVAC in the process. The answer is that a ceiling fan is moving air at basically zero "static pressure." Static pressure in an HVAC context means the amount of resistance that the air has to moving. In a free environment, that's zero, or close to it, but in a tightly restricted system of ...


8

You might look into ceiling fans with DC motors. While I have not seen a manufacturer talk about quietness, some reviews I've read talk about quietness. The biggest attraction to DC motors is the efficiency of the motors, getting more air movement with less power. My suggestion would be find a local fan / light showroom that has some of these on display ...


7

Many devices are rated for either 110 or 220. There should be a tag on the device which says this. In some appliances its done intentionally so that one model can be sold and safely used in countries which use either voltage. In other cases its simply dumb luck that the component parts can tolerate either voltage. I'm not sure if this fully answers your ...


6

I would exchange the fan. It sounds like it is either over heating and there is a safety feature that cuts it out or there is a problem with the motor winding and when it heats up it causes a bad coil wire or a bad connection to open.


6

In general the point is to filter your water. If you want to be sure about it, check the volume of your pool, and the flow rate of your pump. Run it long enough to go through that much volume 1-2 times a day. In practice, that's probably around 6-8 hours. Make sure your chemistry is good, and then try it. If it looks nice for a few weeks, try lowering ...


5

This may be as simple as the "start" or "run" capacitor going south (because the motor starts but dies afterwards, I suspect that the run capacitor is blown). If you are comfortable digging around in the control box for the furnace, then you should be able to find 1 or 2 large-ish capacitors. If you have a multimeter, you can test them against the specs ...


5

Single phase 1hp = 756 watts 5hp = 3730 watts 3730 watts at 230 volts = 17 amps Three Phase 3730 watts = 3730(watts) / (207(v) x 1.73) or 3730 / 358.11 = 10.4 amps. Three phase is 40% less amperage. There are other things to make this accurate, like motor efficiency and power factor. I used 1 for each. Another savings is that with the reduced ...


5

Common AC electric motors have a high impedance on starting because velocity is 0, This draws a large initial current to get the motion started and as velocity increases impedance drops and the current draw decreases. A dimmer will reduce the wattage to the fan motor meaning that you are increasing the impedance over time, meaning that heat will buildup ...


5

Unless it came with a 20A plug (pictured below), it's designed to plug into a 15A receptacle. The 20A plug has one blade twisted 90 degrees to prevent it from being plugged into a 15A receptacle. The corresponding 20A receptacle has a slot shaped to accept a standard 15A plug or a 20A plug: This assumes that the plug on the snowthrower is factory ...


4

Sounds like your blower may be done but I am not really sure. One thing to try is to call your Gas or Electric company and see if you have a service plan. Some utility companies include a service plan charge on your monthly bill (and you might not even know about it) and it includes 24 hour service.


4

Maybe you have a belt that is slipping. It might make noise until the blower starts spinning. It you have a belt, check the tension.


4

At 4:1, 200 lbs should not be difficult to lift by hand. Save yourself the $75 and just buy a rope cleat to secure the lift cable.


4

I have two of these Racor Heavy Lifts in my garage now. I also had one in my old house. They now have a rod that you can connect to a drill to raise and lower the platforms. At $127 they are very affordable and work quite well. I store my lawnmower on it in the winter and the snowblower on it in the summer along with some other items that are not used ...


4

According to Murphy and his annoying law, if you buy a motor, then you'll have a solenoid go out, or the controller behind the dial will go out. I've found it's cheaper to wait for something to actually break, if you can't predict which component will break, and then decide if it's worth fixing or you're ready for a replacement.


4

I know you've checked the door but here is how you know if the door is okay . . . disconnect the garage door opener and open the garage door half way. If it stays there then the garage door is balanced, otherwise there are problems. Sure, the motor could be burned out but if the door isn't balanced the replacement unit will burn out too! If the unit is ...


4

Most electronic noise is made by the AC cyclic voltage, which is audible whenever that wave is transferred into something that can vibrate. That noise generally becomes more prominent (changing from a hum to a buzz) when there is something that changes the waveform to produce sharp "corners" (a "square wave"). A particularly noisy combination is a TRIAC wall ...


4

If you have the condensers already selected, you should be able to get the two pieces of data you need to make a decision. 1) price increase for 3 phase condenser 2) operating power for single phase and 3 phase units. I suspect they will quote you that the two units consume the same amount of operating power. Yes, theory says 3 phase motors run smoother ...


4

No on the brake fluid and no on the steering fluid. If the fan has a fitting to apply oil use a light oil like 3 in 1 home lubricant. If the fan isn't equipped with an oiling port you will have to disassemble the fan to gain access to the bushings or bearings.


4

Brake Fluid is not a lubricant, but a glycol based hydraulic fluid designed to have a high boiling point and to absorb water to prevent corrosion (why the brake system should be completely bled out every so often). Power Steering fluid and Transmission fluid are petroleum based hydraulic fluids, more useful for their ability to transmit pressure, resist ...


4

It's not going to be about brushed vs. brushless motors but the quality and grade of the parts used in the tools. Heavy duty equipment like a compressor or table saw are likely to use heavier wiring and components which can take the higher voltage, where the lighter weight tools are overheating with the voltage they weren't designed for.


4

Plugging the vacuum into a surge suppressor with EMI filtering, should prevent the vacuum from tripping the breaker. However, if the vacuum is overloading the circuit, no filter will help. When I run my vacuum sweeper / paper shredder / treadmill / etc. it trips my AFCI. Eaton’s AFCI has been designed to work with devices with motors that are ...


4

Light dimmers are designed to drive loads that are largely resistive in nature like light bulbs. They are generally not compatible with loads that are inductive. Most, if not all, AC motors are inductive type loads. That said, whether a dimmer switch will work safely with your fan or not depends entirely upon the type of motor on the fan. There are some ...


4

Just because the furnace fan is rated at 3/4 or more horsepower, does not mean that it is actually running at that power level. To clarify this, consider the extreme with an electric motor with nothing connected (just a shaft sticking out) spinning at full speed: it uses almost no power: perhaps as little as 3 watts, even though its ratings plate says 700 ...


4

1) American house-current power is commonly described as anything from 110VAC to 120VAC.(Similarly, the higher voltage obtained by using both phases is called everything from 220VAC to 240VAC.) I believe this is mostly a historical artifact, and appliances labelled for anything in the respective range should work with any voltage within that range. 2) ...


4

Once you have corrected your axis of rotation it should be obvious that the idea to lengthen the "clip" will not change anything with regard to the force required to raise the flap. Actually it could make things worse if the longer clip added more weight to the whole assembly. The force needed to raise the flap is measured in some units like foot-pounds ...



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