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The fact that one branch duct is at the end doesn't mean much. You could install a damper there to balance flow a bit. Of bigger concern is that they used flex duct and bent it severely. If the one in the photo is any indication, they didn't do a great job. You shouldn't see such sharp, tight bends. It also doesn't appear that flex duct was necessary ...


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In either case you have a 10" duct as the bottleneck in the trunk line. Expanding it downstream won't get you much in terms of flow. I'd go with Plan A. Perhaps a more important question: Is the inlet attached to the fireplace somehow? You'll probably be disappointed if you just pull air from one room to another. The differential would be so small that you ...


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The reason that 90 degree turns (or any tight radius bends) in duct systems are discouraged are because they reduce air-flow. The friction that is encountered by the moving air as it hits the wall of the turn slows it down decreasing the distance it can travel. There are equations that can be used to calculate the number of bends before air performance is ...


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A unit like that is designed to slide in from the side or bottom. I'd simply install it as normal, and add 1" metal flanges to the top and inner edges on either the upstream or downstream sides using rivets or screws. It's probably not important that the damper be perfectly centered. You'll need to cut slots in the duct to accommodate the top one. The hole ...


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I would go over sized rather than undersized if you have the room to do it. An undersized unit will limit your maximum flow, unless you always will be reducing the flow to that area then go undersized. Strips of ducting can be purchased at most home stores that you can rivet from one side to the other then use a good quality duct tape to seal. They make a ...


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All of the air that blows out of your vents to heat or cool a room has to go somewhere. That somewhere is the large air return vent. When you close the door to a room, and there's not much of a gap under the door, the air blowing from the vents doesn't have any where to go (you just sealed the air's access to the return vent which is probably in a hallway ...



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