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14

I assume you are in a cold climate, like Minnesota (where I am). I will address your question in three parts; the first two have to do with the humidifier. The "winter" setting on the duct in your photo: It appears from the photo that the duct in question goes from your humidifier around to the return (intake) side of your furnace's ducting. This needs ...


8

For the ducts, the setting indicates where you should set the switch based on the season. If your house has separate air return ducts on different floors or even multiple ducts on the same floor, changing the setting changes which ducts pull air from the house, allowing lower ducts to suck cold air out in the winter and higher ducts to suck hot air out in ...


8

You need a duct crimper like this to reduce the diameter of the end of one piece of duct: Run the tool around the end of the duct so that you have multiple parallel crimps. That piece should slide right into the uncrimped piece, giving you a secure connection to tape. If you don't want to spring for a dedicated tool, I've seen where people use ...


7

There's stick-on wire chases that can be purchased. I think the usual big box hardware stores carry them. Slide the wire inside, peel off the sticky, and bury it in a corner. You won't see it. Google plastic raceway cable organizers. The first one that came up says it was available in black or ivory. ...


7

For the duct work, since we don't know how many cables you are talking about, I suggest ENT (Electrical Non-Metallic Tubing). It is flexible, corrugated and comes in a range of sizes, same as PVC. You can even use PVC connectors on ENT if in a bind. For termination, you can either use a box / terminating structured media center or make your own with a ...


7

Yes. I have heard of that. I believe the main issue with asbestos is when it becomes dust and floats in the air and is inhaled into the lungs. Painting over that seals it in and prevents that from happening. It probably should be repainted whenever it starts to show wear. You will probably need to use a government certified painter who will use special ...


7

Do the joints in adjustable duct elbows need to be taped as well once they're adjusted Yes, they do. or are they considered air-tight? No, they are not. Far from it, in fact. You want to tape every seam in your ductwork, using (as Shirlock pointed out) foil tape. Each exposed seam, whether it's at a connection or part of pre-formed metal like ...


7

First, what you do not want to use is duct tape, the adhesive fails under the extreme temperatures. For dryer vents and HVAC ducts, you should seal seams with a foil backed tape. This is designed to be airtight and handle the temperature swings that would cause other types of tape to fail. Note: sample product image, no affiliation or recommendation for ...


6

If it is a manual damper, there is usually a wing nut that attaches the handle to the shaft of the damper. If this wing nut is loose, it might allow the handle to turn without actually turning the internal damper. I would verify that the nut us tight and when you turn the handle, you can actually see the shaft rotating at the same time. If the tube of the ...


5

Well first, the outlet being at-grade is a no-no for those pest reasons. They don't have to get up the vertical pipe to cause problems; a mouse or bird can nest in there and cause problems. They did it anyway because it was easier to run it down through the crawl space then up to the ceiling (where, if this is your garage, they'd then have to build a sealed ...


5

Don't use duck/duct tape on HVAC ducts, use foil tape. Duct tape isn't designed to take the heat variations in duct work and will lose it's adhesion over time. More than likely you can unscrew this section of duct work and remove it instead of cutting holes. With it removed, you can either fix the damper or replace the section with a new damper. If the ...


5

If you go to your local hardware store you will be able to find a tape made for air ducts and high heat areas. It would be something like this 3M High Temperature Flue Tape. But also a new dryer vent is probably going to be cheaper to buy than the roll of tape when you only need one piece from the entire roll. So if you can easily get to the back of ...


5

There are thousands of species of mold known to Science, with different species being found in different parts of the world. There isn't any one "crawlspace" mold or "air duct" mold, it's just whatever spores of whatever species happened to take a foothold there. Which one is more dangerous will depend on the particular species of mold and the sensitivity ...


5

furnace and hot water heater are a few feet away Combustion air intake which is necessary on an insulated and sealed buiding. Otherwise negative pressure prevents combustion gasses from going up the stack. In the case of any carbon monoxide content, this condition can be deadly. Partition the furnace and water heater off so they're not part of the ...


4

Leather gloves and safety glasses. Wide rubber band wrapped around the duct at the position you want to cut (a wide band stays in position better than a narrow one). Leave a little extra to allow for smoothing out any irregularities at the end. Permanent marker to mark the line you'll be cutting along. Hacksaw to start the cut. With the line marked, it's ...


4

Looking at the specifications on the page you linked to, it appears to be made of the same basic materials as other duct tapes: plastic coated fabric with a rubber adhesive. Premium Grade it may be, but I think you'll run into the same problems -- it'll get brittle and crack with age. I've used aluminum foil tape where I've needed spot repairs; Home ...


4

Mold detection and identification can be done in two ways. Visible mold can be collected on a test tape, and air borne spores can be collected with an air sample kit. Either way, samples must be sent to a lab for microscopic inspection and ID. Mold and mold spores can range from common everyday varieties that rarely have negative effects on humans to very ...


4

I believe it's called a "boot", and yes, they're generally pre-fabricated. However, if the existing ones are in good shape, they shouldn't need replacing. If they're damaged, then the reasonableness depends on what your contract says.


4

There are many cable-wrapping solutions. My first suggestion would be small heat-shrink tubing. This would hold multiple wires together, and color them black. small split loom could accomplish the same thing, although it would look very different if any light shone into the cabinet. Ultimately, you could simply wrap the wires in electrical tape, although ...


4

You're probably fine with the larger diameter (I wouldn't go smaller), but I would install a damper where you tie into the main trunk and then have someone come and rebalance the system using flow meters. That way a professional can optimize your entire house so that the air entering each room is the same relative to it's size and heat load, and the house ...


4

It is possible that the previous dryer was a stacked unit with the dryer mounted above the washer.The general rule for dryer vents is not any longer than necessary.Two concerns I have are the flex hose if you can replace it with an elbow do that if not use metallic flex not the plastic type.The second concern is if you live in an area that sees snowfall ...


4

Duct Tape is good for a lot of things, except duct work! It will eventually dry up and pull away from the heat in the vent. I would bend/dent one of the ends slightly so that it will fit easily inside of the other. Then I'd secure it with proper HVAC foil tape, followed by a clamp around it. Foil Tape Metal Gear Clamp


4

If you put a couple of sheet metal screws in the joints, and tape them with foil tape, you should be able to do a 5 foot vertical rise with support at the roof boot or where you contact the rafters. You could use straps, but usually the boot if sized properly will be fine if the bottom of the run is supported well.


4

I would probably use a strain relief connector (aka dome connector): There have a rubber grommet in the middle that compresses down around the wire when you tighten it, forming an air-tight seal. Some also have a gasket around the nut at the bottom. These are really easy to install (just require a 3/8" hole), pretty cheap, and available at the box stores. ...


4

You're looking for Duct Wrap. It's actually an insulation in it's own right, being one side foil, and the other side fiber insulation. I see no reason why you couldn't apply it over top of the existing insulation, provided everything is dry. http://www.homedepot.ca/product/reflectix-duct-wrap-12x25/902353


3

On your length, per your description you should be OK. 504.6.1 Maximum length. The maximum length of a clothes dryer exhaust duct shall not exceed 45 feet (13 716 mm) from the dryer location to the outlet terminal. The maximum length of the duct shall be reduced 5 feet (1524 mm) for each 45 degree (0.79 rad) bend and 10 feet (3048 mm) for each 90 degree ...


3

I wonder if it would be possible to dye the wires a darker color? Makezine featured methods for doing this some time ago http://blog.makezine.com/2009/07/18/how-to-dye-computer-parts/


3

New answer thanks to updated question. Yes, the lip around the rim of the opening I'd call it a "ridge" but I dunno if that's right) on the boot is there to help ensure a firm connection. It's to keep the zip tie on the inner core from slipping free. This is necessary (the keeping the duct snug, not nessarily the tie) if your ducting is going to be ...


3

If I understand your question, you have a boot like this: And you want to put a crimp like this on it: So that you can slide some flex duct to it. If that's the case, then there is a crimp tool to do that: It's also possible to do using a pair of long needle nose pliers (which saves you the expensive of buying/renting a speciality tool for a ...



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