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With a couple of $15 buckets of drywall mud and a few hours of elbow grease, you can apply the mud right over the paneling. To make the result look even remotely good, you'll want to hit it with a few coats, waiting for each coat to dry, and get the surface finish as smooth as possible. Assuming you don't have any experience applying drywall texture, don't ...


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I can't say much about the ceiling, but we recently "refinished" our paneled basement simply by painting the walls: a light sanding to break the glossy surface, two coats of primer and two coats of white paint did the trick. You can definitely see the old grooves in the paneling, but it looks good enough to us that we used the same technique on the paneling ...


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I have gone through the same process and found that almost any primer will work. As to the gouges, I used drywall joint compound to fill them. If the gouges are small and you don't have any joint compound and do happen to have spackle, then use that.


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Do not sand or scuff up anything. Apply a coat of primer over the whole thing and allow to completely dry. Use setting type 90, light weight joint compound, in small batches, to smooth out the imperfections. (It comes in a bag.) Do not sand between coats - if you do, use a well wrung sponge, to remove excess dust, before applying another coat of mud. Use ...


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You need to get a wire brush and scratch the hell out of your wall in the bad area and a little outside of it. Add mud to flatten area. Let it dry. Scrape any high areas (with mud knife). Add a big layer of mud for a second coat. Scrape then thoroughly sand. You are going to have to prime and paint the area. If you just slightly prime the already ...


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Ugh. The paint is just going to make what should be pretty easy rather more difficult. Even your drywall pros sand stuff - they just waste far less time than amateurs trying to get the mud perfect (and messing it up more) - get it on, get it dry, sand, next coat. Drywall mud is made to be easily sanded. Paint, not so much. Don't even think about painting ...


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I would not add drywall over plaster, as the guy said before. You have to not only look at the depth of electrical outlets, but now your door jambs are the wrong size, and window sills and trim will all have to be redone.


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My home has a mix of 1/2 and 5/8 drywall on the ceiling and it is completely related to the spacing of the ceiling joists. If they are 16 on center, the builder used 1/2. If they are wider than 16, then they used 5/8. The 5/8 will prevent sagging between wider ceiling joists.


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You should always 'try' to install drywall perpendicular to the support. So you are right, it should be perpendicular to the RC, which will be parallel to the joists. With that said, if it makes more sense to run it perpendicular to the RC then it really isn't a bit deal to do so. You can also run the RC with the joists too.


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At 6 pounds, a simple picture hook will do. Any box store or hardware store will have them and they will list their load rating on them. Working from memory, I think the smallest size has a 10 pound rating.


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1965 - test the paint for lead. If you have lead paint, you'll need to take appropriate precautions. As for painting preparation, the usual - remove all flaking and peeling paint (scrape, sand, whatever it takes) back to sound substrate - if the substrate is not sound, replace it. That would be firmly attached paint, or the surface of the plaster or ...


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ive been a drywall contractor for over 25 years...the problem wit rehanging the rock on the ceiling is the risk of getting halfway across the lid and inespecially older homes,where the roof trusses were the nailers,they are not as accurate as a stick framed joist type nailer...if there are no blocking to hold trusses square,over time if house settles truss ...


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You can find the studs, I know you can! Here is a link to many helpful tips: http://www.bobvila.com/articles/how-to-find-a-wall-stud/ but the short version is, measure from the corner of the room (there will be a stud within 1" of each corner of the room and look for the stud on a 16" spacing (unless your home/condo/apt is really old). Drill a few pilot ...


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Yes, assuming that you use toggles or snap toggles, and assuming your drywall is in good condition. But since standard drywall is on 16" centers, you probably haven't hunted for a stud hard enough yet. http://www.naturalhandyman.com/iip/inffastener/infanchor/infanchor.html http://www.todayshomeowner.com/testing-wall-anchors-and-picture-hangers/ You can ...


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The best thing you could do is to put ceramic tiles but since that's not what you want let’s try to think of something else. Firstly you must replace damaged drywall. It is extra sensitive when it comes to moisture or water. You can, and should replace it with moisture resistant drywall which is normally used in bathrooms. Then you should apply some ...



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