New answers tagged

0

Simple solution - overlap the shower flange where you can, and fill the gaps with Durabond. Complex solution - rip that little strip of drywall off, overlap with a larger piece, that wraps around the top of the shower. In both cases, you'll want to put "corner bead", on the corner pictured, that goes from floor to ceiling.


2

Stiffness is one reason, but not exactly in the way that was mentioned above. That return will prevent waviness as viewed from the room. Also, raw edges are ugly, even if they return into the wall. They're difficult to caulk, too, as there's no real bond surface--the caulk just falls behind if there's a gap.


0

Unless the tape is badly torn up or loose, just sand high spots and then put one or two coats of drywall compound over it. I have no experience using DAP spackle as joint compound - mostly because I'm a professional and just use joint compound for joints. Spackle is more expensive when you're dealing with large quantities. It would make a better job to go ...


0

See this answer for more information on drilling through joists. For your case specifically, you're able to notch (and angle drill) at a depth of D/6 and a width of D/3 at a time per joist as long as you are notching in the first or last third of the joist. IRC R502.8 Drilling and notching. Structural floor members shall not be cut, bored or ...


2

It's really up to you; there are pros and cons to either choice. Piecing in would be easier and quicker, but then you'd have a butt joint all around the shower to feather out. Tearing the rest of the drywall into the corners would look nicer (no butt joints), but would be plenty more work.


2

It might look sloppy now, but if they are conscientious when taping and finishing, that will not be a problem in the least. It really would only take one quick setting-type coat before taping to get even a 1 inch gap as ready for tape as any other corner. (Assuming there is blocking behind it to back up the compound - there should be, otherwise what is the ...


2

You don't have to tear out the tape, just sand or scrape through the high spots and skim it. The only problem with doing that is if you have a substantial length missing at the actual joint, say over an inch.


0

Normally I would remove the cornice and replace it once the drywall is finished and painted - because that is usually the easiest, if you are okay with installing new crown molding. If that's something you aren't interested in doing (perhaps it's a molding you can't copy and don't want to get rid of), then you can finish your job without removing it. Once ...


4

Although difficult to see and you are not sure if you have exposed the base drywall, I suspect what you have is painted wallpaper. The drywall paper rarely comes off easily without taking some gypsum with it. Because you have described three distinct layers, you may have wallpaper that has been skim coated with mud or primer then painted. What typically ...


0

That looks like poorly-adhering paint to me, possibly on top of a crack in the plaster. You'll need to remove all the loose paint you can find. Then, feather the sharp edges of paint with a thin layer of plaster, prime, and paint the wall.


2

I'd tap the rest of the wall and see really how much you need to repair. From the photo it looks as though you will have another inch or two upwards and at least another inch going down. This is a really easy fix though. You can get a tub of mud (plaster patch) at any home improvement, hardware or even your local department store and even large grocery ...


1

How many dB of isolation are you looking for? The ideal would be to isolate the inside and outside from each other, which means offset studs and joists. The walls and floor could be filled with sand to achieve further isolation, if your building structure will handle the weight.... websearch home recording studios, many if the solutions for those would ...


2

Skim coat is more reliable than magic paint, but no direct experience with that particular flavor of magic paint, just seen lots of problems in general with magic paint and wallpaper residue. The counterintuitive (at first) fastest (and thus cheapest when labor is a cost, however you count that cost) approach that's 100% reliable is to rock over it (you can ...


0

I am a commercial gc. We use double 5/8 regularly. Forget about the staggered rock and all that. To make it easy on yourself. Leave Home Depot, go to a building supply and ask for oversized metal corner paper faced. It will give you a wider metal face and have paper drywall tape attached to prevent crack throughs. Attach it with spray 90 spray adhesive and ...


1

This is most likely easily fixed by swapping the box out with a different style (Old Work Box) or simply running some screws into the side of the existing box if it's against a stud, depending on the situation. Pictures will help. Either way, it's unlikely that you will have to cut into the wall. a) Here is how to remove an broken electrical box: ...


0

It looks like water damage to me. Likely either a roof leak or a condensation problem with one of the ducts (or something else entirely that you don't know is there?). It's also possible for the leak to be elsewhere above the ducts and this is just where the water found its way down to the ceiling. Do you have access to the area above(attic)? If so, ...


0

You'll need to patch the areas, where the paper tore off, and then skim coat the entire wall, so that the patched areas, don't stand out "shinier and flatter", than the rest of the wall. At this point, Google is your friend, especially if you plan to fix it yourself. You may also be able to get a contractor, to do the whole thing, for a fairly cheap price. ...


2

Assuming that this is a new 4 inches of floor on a ground level structure... No this is definitely not ok. Greenboard is mold resistant. It is, however, still just gypsum with paper over it. Neither is using pressure treated wood as a barrier. Why? Concrete wicks water. Any water near the area will be distributed to be brought into direct contact with ...


0

Find a socket. Should be a stud on either side. Locate that stud then measure 16".


0

All good answers but the best answer falls to number 0 or JS. I worked for years in fire restoration of old old homes that were almost always lath and plaster. Because our mud professional was extremely good at his job (it is very important to have a real expert professional who knows what he or she is doing with the new mud) we would always save time and ...


4

I generally agree with DMoore about butt joints needing to be on studs, but the reason is simply that you need to keep the two sheets from moving with respect to each other. For that reason, you could probably butt join over just the lath. If you can hit enough solid lath with drywall screws to securely anchor the sheet ends together, you probably won't have ...


0

In addition to what DMoore said, you might also think about installing your drywall sheets horizontally. With odd stud spacing, this will mean fewer and shorter (4' vs 8') cuts. I don't have all the info about your particular situation, but I would heartily recommend removing the existing lath and plaster and install the drywall directly to the studs.


5

The edges of your drywall pieces must be on studs - at least two of them and preferentially all four. (some drywall guys will vastly disagree with needing 4 so not trying to start a war) But two is a must. Your drywall should end on stud or be butted up in the center with another piece of drywall. Either cut your drywall or add more studs. There is ...



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