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-1

I had a gap at the top of the drywall of about 1 inch on one end tapering to 1/2 inch at the other end of a length of 36 inches. I took a 2.5 inch wide piece of drywall doubled scored in the middle of the backing for 1/2 inch for the whole 36 inch length. I then snapped the 1 inch ends and peeled off the drywall from the front paper. This left me with a ...


0

I don't suppose you have a hammer drill? Tapcons! (my favorite concrete screws, you need 2", maybe 2.25") bushed out with 1" worth of washers. Make sure they're not home first ;) If you fall into a void after drilling into the 'concrete' they're probably cinder-blocks. If you then can't get the screws to bite, make the hole even bigger and use really long ...


0

You could also try to get a board to go between the joists if you can't hit them directly. The holding strength of drywall isn't much in this direction. Really if you look at drywall it's about 2 pieces of paper with a little bit of "stuff" in between. If you have the vertical space you could push a piece of wood through a hole near one of the anchors or ...


0

You might have some luck with a wooden brace attached to the drywall above and below, and then patch in a small piece of new drywall, attaching it to the brace. You can spackle the gaps, and then re-caulk against the tile.


0

For small spots and ink or crayons, once you have removed as much as you can, allow to dry. Hit it with "White Out" Nothing dries faster and stuff doesn't have a chance of bleeding through. I used it The first time out of desperation. It's been a real handy go to as it's cheep and I always have it around. It works great on small jobs.


1

There is not a good easy way to structurally mount a pullup bar to a wall with gypsum board on resilient channels which does not significantly impact the existing gypsum board finish because the resilient channels allow for some movement.


1

The 3.5" studs are either doubled-up 2x4s, or a sideways 2x4. I would use the 2" studs to mount it on because if the 3.5" studs are sideways, they will be more likely to bow out under load, and a regular 2x4 is more than strong enough to hold body weight.


2

You've pretty much got it. If you can twist wires with wire nuts and connect them to a switch you have the technical skills needed. The hardest part is usually pulling the wire from the wall into the ceiling. Get an "old work" ceiling/light box. Cut a hole in the desired ceiling location, ensuring no joist will interfere with anchoring the old work box ...


-1

I would look for a ceiling light that is mounted with regular expansion plug screws (or whatever kind of screw is applicable to your ceiling material) instead of older methods such as hooks or threaded pipe. Then it's just a matter of running the wires (or rather, some proper electrical conduit such as corrugated tubing) from your switch to that spot over ...


3

Use scrim tape on both 90 degree and non-90 degree internal corners. I've never had a problem with it in internal corners, though I don't do much plastering. You can use skim beads on non-90 degree external corners; it might help to squash them out to open further and better fit the profile of the corner. Don't forget to scrim tape the straight board ...


1

A vibrating Multi-Tool (Dremel multimax etc) will work great on this. Mark with a line and cut freehand, you can easily get within 1/8th inch.


0

You are never going to cut it perfectly enough to just drop the new windows in and then have the dry wall look nice. I recommend completely removing the drywall and corner bead. After the new windows are in, use wood to trim where the drywall was. Half inch boards, ripped to the width need to go flush between the window and wall. And then window casing ...


1

If you happen to have one, or can get one cheaply, a rotary drywall "saw" or cutout tool (more like a router, really) will do everything but the extreme corners quickly and easily (and very, very messily/dustily - a shop vacuum is highly recommended as well.) Depending how many windows you have to do, it might or might not make sense - or your local tool ...


1

The right tool in this case is the good old fashioned razor knife. (handle with a razor blade in it). Like this: I suggest utilizing a strait edge to make sure you cut a good line. I personally use my 4' aluminum level.


0

Remove all of the damaged sheet rock with a razor knife, or small saw. Once you have a hole with solid edges, measure the thickness of the sheetrock on your wall. Buy, beg, or borrow a small piece of sheetrock in that same thickness. You can buy small pieces at your local home center, but if any new homes are being built near you, you can get a piece just ...


0

I would get some prefinished 1 x 4's and glue them with construction adhesive (liquid nails) to the drywall vertically to provide a solid surface to fasten the shelving to. Place one every 16 to 24 inches and you will be fine.


2

You could use plumbers tape to try and restrain the pipe but if the force required to move the pipe is significant and you already have the wall torn open you might want to just fir that wall out before reapplying your drywall. After seeing the picture you will probably want to just drywall around the protruding bit, which is almost certainly a clean-out. ...


1

Use the drywall panel itself to hold the pipe back, just push gently on the panel and fasten it in place. If the force required is indeed "quite small" it should be no problem at all. Alternatively, you might be able to do something simple, like wrap one or more wide zip-ties around it and use a concrete screw to fasten the "tails" of the zip-tie/s to the ...


7

There are hole patch kits that can be purchased at most hardware stores. If that's not an option (maybe the hole is too big?) you can take a small square of drywall that's bigger than the hole and hold it up over the hole, mark around the piece with a pencil and then cut the hole out to the outside of the line. Then take two slats of 1x3 and use screws to ...


1

Traditional solution: Get some thin wood strapping. Cut two pieces a bit longer than the hole. Slide them through the hole, and drive wallboard screws through the surviving plaster to hold them in place. Cut a wallboard patch to fit into the opening, and drive wallboard screws through it into the wood supports you've just installed. Spackle the joint ...


1

The best way to handle this situation is to span two studs at the end of the closet with a smallish plank, screwing it into both studs. Then you can screw the rod end mount to that plank and rest assured that it's as sturdy as you can get it. The "far" end of that plank will very probably screw to the stud at the far rear corner of the closet's end wall, ...


2

if the post is within the line of the walls: Blue is existing, red is nailing strips, green is bulkhead...


1

Build a wall in front of the short wall with the studs oriented flat. Use a PT 2x2 for extending the sole plate. Block the end solid to the post with ripped studs as required to strengthen corner. Blocking is lumber used for additional nailing surfaces and/or to create rigidity in the direction perpendicular to the primary framing members. Solid blocking ...



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