New answers tagged

2

In my last house a daylight basement the original sheetrock was glued to the cement walls with liquid nails that worked very well. I did pull it all out and add furring for electrical spaces. (I don't like exposed conduit and surface boxes in a room that became my man land). If you are worried about cracking at the sill add a accent trim over the gap.


1

One possible solution (there are no doubt others, and I'll be interested to see what they are) is to set a strip (4 to 12" wide) of 1/2" cement-based tile-backer board at the bottom edge of the drywall.


6

Aside from electrical and plumbing interference, you can do pretty much whatever you want with the framing. That wall is mostly decorative (it saved some money by not requiring the cabinet makers to finish the backs of the cabinets). If you have smooth walls, open the drywall enough to work. Frame in your opening, replace the drywall, add corner bead or ...


0

Both versions of green top mud are for embedding tape, blue top is mainly for finishing. Quick-set mud or hot mud as for filling or repairing. Both green and blue top can also be used for filling but take a lot of time to dry


0

There is a butterfly anchor sold at most hardware/home stores. It's a V shape with a nut and a spring at the point of the V. It will fit into a 1" hole and then expand once pushed through the hole to a wider diameter. You may need to drill the diameter of the hole in the standard out to accommodate the larger screw. But these are very strong drywall ...


-3

Using a Dyson, vacuum the wall.


1

No, you cannot support your blinds with two pieces of paper, because that's all there is in drywall to resist the tension force pulling out or at an angle. The contained gypsum is strong to compression, you can stand on it if it's flat on the floor. But if you screw in and then exert force to pull the screw out, with very little force you'll either have the ...


0

holy macaroni - this is the biggest series of exchanges i have seen over an incredibly simple problem. you need nothing more than a utility knife, a drywall knife and a handsaw 1) just cut vertically through the drywall with a sharp utility knife about 3/4" in from the edge (studs are typically 1 1/2" thick). its easy and will only take you about 5 ...


0

On a hole this small, it wouldn't matter, if you opened it up, all the way to the other side of both 2x4 studs. The sistering solution above is probably the simplest, except for the strip in the middle - as long as your patch is 16" or less, on the loose side - it won't flex. I'd follow along the other side of the stud, with a hole saw, and call it a day - ...


0

You probably want to start with tanking tape, and use caulk for the final seal. https://youtu.be/IwR-vS4xc9g?t=9m15s


1

They make 1/16" Drywall shims, you can find them at home depot, Drywall suppliers have 1/8" drywall shims. They are made of cardboard, and do the job nicely.


7

I'm a Drywaller of 25 years, the saw blade suggestions are DANGEROUS there are possible screws going up the center of that stud ... do not use a saw blade, the guy who suggested the utility knife had it right, make sure you have a screw gun handy incase you come across a screw.


2

WHile the selected answer is the cleanest way, if you wish to cut back to the existing studs, use the RightToolForTheJob (TM). That is, get yourself a multi-tool oscillator, like this one Genesis . There are better, more expensive ones, but either way this tool will do a hundred different jobs. For your purpose, put the saw blade on and it'll be easy ...


2

I have an abused cordless circular-saw for situations like this, where adding furring isn't an option. The accepted answer tells you how to patch a hole in some drywall where adding furring is an option. It fails to entail how to cut drywall half-off a stud (upvoted however, because as pictured, that's what you do). Draw a line. Set the appropriate depth. ...


0

Just to point out the other solution: Any the new fixture as a swag lamp, surface-mounted with a decorative treatment bringing the power cord across the ceiling and down to an outlet. That's how my living room is currently lit. Or do a fake coffered/beamed ceiling, running the wire through the "beams".


25

You want to add backing to the inside sides of the existing studs as well as to the centre of the span. The simplest way to do this is to cut the new backing (preferably 2x4, or whatever the existing stud dimensions are) about 4" longer than the height of the opening and screw them to the existing studs. The cut one more piece of backing to the same length ...


6

Use a utility knife to score through the drywall. It will take several passes to get all the way through. Go slow, be careful, and don't over cut at the ends. Only go 3/4" onto the stud, going an inch or more could cause you to expose the whole stud and weaken the drywall on the opposite side. I do agree that doing this is not enough for that wide of a ...


3

Assuming the hole is the width of a typical stud bay, just attaching the patch on the edges is not a sufficiently strong solution. Screws (or nails) near edges weaken the structural integrity of drywall and the patch is likely to shift and crack eventually. I would attach short pieces to each stud for mounting the sides and 1x3s top and bottom to span the ...


2

Movement is the enemy of masonry of any type. In this case, it depends on a few factors. How much movement? How often does the movement occur? What products were used to install the tile? What size and type of tile? If all you're asking is whether some cracking is likely to occur, the answer is yes. However, it may be negligible from an aesthetic ...


3

I much prefer to use the mesh tape that has a sticky back on it. Cut your tape to size, press it in place, and then spread your compound over it. The paper tape is messier, harder to work with, and can slip around. Also, my experience with spackling vs premixed drywall compound is that the spackling is dryer. It makes filling larger holes easier. It doesn't ...


5

There's really only one right way to do this. It takes a bit of time, but it's not difficult or complicated. You'll want to replace the tape to ensure that the seam doesn't propagate through the paint. Pick up some premixed topping compound (available in gallon or smaller buckets), and a short roll of joint tape (cheap enough to not bother experimenting ...


1

Get yourself a small bucket of pre-mixed tape compound in the Sheetrock section of Home Depot/Lowes, and 2 sizes of putty knives if you don't already own some. You would then put a thin coat or two overlapping the missing piece. Let it dry and sand lightly. It may take a few coats and sanding sessions to get near perfect.


2

Sounds like you need a good exhaust fan to keep the moisture down. Good luck!



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