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1

The easiest option would be to run a new cable directly from the switch, up to the ceiling fixture. You'll want to either install a larger box and a new switch, or a double switch, so the light can be controlled independently. If you're working in a home constructed of solid wood framing, you should be able to run the new cable fairly easily. Since you ...


1

Things can yellow for a variety of reasons, water, smoking, etc etc etc. It really depends on the materials you are working with as well. If the wallpaper came off that easily, water is a good guess. What should I do? Lots of options, I have two suggestions (see below) Is it normal? for a house that old, normal is a relative term, Ill go with yes Is it ...


2

Depending on the condition of the floor above your ceiling, it might be easier and cheaper to access the ceiling void through the floor. For example, if the floor upstairs is going to be renovated too, or if the floor cover is a carpet, which can be lifted and put back easily, or even better - if it is just the original floorboards, you can easily lift one ...


2

First, never notch the bottom of beams. All electrical runs should be in the center third of any timber. This is for structural support as well as protecting the electrical. If you want to keep the wall outlet switched, consider knocking out the current one gang and replace with old work two gang. Run a new line up the wall, through the top plate into ...


0

It doesn't matter at all. I actually used to make my crew attach to the face and they actually came back to me with this report. If you read through the report you will see that there is a 1% difference in performance if you staple face or side. It is negligible. On the flip side I will say I haven't ran across screws popping because of stapling to ...


3

Attach to the stud face. The vapor barrier is not as effective if stapled to the stud sides. And as you say, the fill won't be ideal. (are your external walls 2x4 or 2x6?) The paper on the fiberglass is the vapor barrier. And a barrier is definitely needed where you live. Optionally, you can use unfaced insulation and a plastic sheet vapor barrier. ...


1

The higher section could easily be furred down (after removing the drywall) with strips of 1/2" plywood.


1

There are a few solutions for such a problem. What I would do is mark the locations of the joists on the higher drywall, and then glue and screw new half inch drywall right on top of it. (Or 3/8" or 5/8" depending on if it's not exactly a half inch difference.) This will most likely be the cheapest and easiest option. You could also remove the drywall, ...


1

You'll have a header running across the 90° transition in the framing direction, so this shouldn't be that difficult to fix. I'd remove the drywall from the last stud bay (shaded below)... ...and attach blocking to the header that will catch the sheetrock. Since you're getting air ingress there, I'd take the opportunity to insulate while you have it ...


3

Typically most wood framed houses will have wood framing running from floor to ceiling on either side of the window. If you mount an inch and half away from the edge of the window opening you will most likely hit wood. But the best way is to head to the store and buy a stud finder. It's a small hand held device that will find the wood/metal framing ...


1

Use drywall anchors which come in many shapes and sizes. Select the one suitable for the load being applied. For heavier loads, such as bookshelves, use a stud finder and attach the shelves through the drywall to the wood stud.


4

Since you want to have the drywall piece be 5" high I think you will want to have backer behind it for its full height. Consider making it 5.5" high and then using a piece of 2x6 lumber (that comes 5.5 inches wide) as the backer piece. Cut a couple of pieces to straddle across the bottom of this opening at the back and middle to hold up the shelf the full ...


0

IRC only requires 1/2" gyp. brd. for garage walls except when there is a living space above the garage. When a living space exists above the garage then 5/8" type X gyp. brd. must be used on the ceiling.


2

Your hunch is correct - the anchor bolt in the picture obviously isn't doing a whole lot. If the scabbed on 2x4 bothers you, just remove it, cut the existing anchor bolt off flush with the concrete, and put in a new anchor through the center of the base plate.


2

I want to add on to ben's answer. You will always have sag with a 14 foot header. If it is a metal i-beam maybe 1/100th of an inch... Your wood/LVL will sag much more. What you are describing is ultra typical when there is a point load above and they used LVL. I don't know why cities keep allowing the use of LVL for anything more than 10 feet. It will ...


1

Why not just leave the bolts (lag, I assume) in the holes, screwed in below the level of the wall; then patch the wall. You can find them with a magnet if you ever want to reuse them.


4

Without destructive removal of finishes, it is impossible to know if it is a problem because the deflection of 0.625" (5/8") on a span of 14'-0" is less than the maximum allowable deflection (length/240) that has been typical in most US building codes for many years. The reality is that describing construction as 'meeting the code' sets the bar at the worst ...


1

I realize this answer is 4 years after the question but concrete-form walls have a tendency to stick around for a good long time, so... The concrete form system in the house I am building has vertical plastic strips spaced at 8" on center and running within about 1" of the top and bottom of the form. (So if you look and or dig from the top you won't see it ...


6

Assuming you have fixed the water problem (if not, give up), why not simply attach drywall directly to the entire surface. You may be able to adhere it with construction adhesive. If not, use screws, if necessary, with anchors behind them. If it is available, consider moisture resistant drywall or even paperless. You can then put on any surface finish you ...


2

Once dry, brush marks will not go away without sanding...sorry. Once that is done though: When you paint any given space you should move precisely and quickly. So in this case when you cut out the space in your kitchen (brushing the edges) you should immediately (before the cut work dries) go over it with the roller and get the roller as close to the edge ...


0

If you sand and prime over the part that has brush marks, you could try using a pad trim painter. You won't get brush marks, but you may drive yourself crazy trying to make it look good, since the pad won't look the same as the roller on the rest of the wall.


1

Dark colors and metallics do not cover well as they do not have the pigment (titanium dioxide) that blocks out underlying colors . The use of high quality applicators (brushes and rollers) is critical for ensuring a high quality final finish. Buy a good paintbrush that will deliver an even coating application and you should see those brush marks disappear. ...


1

Why not just measure the height of your bracket and keep note of it, then next time mount it a few inches higher or lower so you don't risk hitting the same spots? I suppose you could also plot the X,Y co-ordinates from a corner of the wall and mark those spots to avoid when you move back.


6

Chip away the drywall over the hole and install a Stud Plate. These are designed to stop anyone from drilling into a wire that runs through a stud. Patch the drywall. Next time, if you can't find the location, and accidentally drill in the same spot, you'll hit the stud plate.


0

Unless the gypsum board is attached directly to the underside of the roof sheathing, it is not a roofing nail. If the gypsum board is attached directly to the underside of the roof sheathing, then there are larger quality of construction issues than a protruding nail.


7

Looks to me like a drywall screw or nail has "bubbled out". It happens sometimes due to wall movement, especially with weather swings (like a real wet winter or a long drought). It also happens when moisture gets to a nail or screw and causes it to corrode. Hopefully your kinda new roof is not leaking. I don't see any signs of plaster discoloration ...


2

That looks suspiciously like somebody decided to cut a door through the wall and either gave up or decided it was too much work. The wall construction looks like veneer plaster, which would fit with the age of the house. Whatever method you decide to use, you're going to have to get some more framing in there. You at very least would need to replace the ...



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