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6

Weight isn't going to be your issue here. 2 inch furring strips may be pretty hard to hit with the drywall screws. The screws need to be in good solid wood and not going through an edge etc. If You are careful, caulk some good lines, the 1X2's might work for ya. The other consideration is if the spacing is good and you have enough surface to butt pieces of ...


1

It doesn't really matter either way. You'll have to do the same work to finish the drywall in either case. If it's an exterior (insulated) wall, then cutting the drywall without damaging the vapour barrier is a bit tricky. I usually try to avoid cutting exterior walls for this reason alone. Benefits to cutting the drywall: If it's an interior wall, you ...


0

You need to build an isolated 'room within room'because you are dealing with 3 main issues. 1. Acoustic sound waves travelling through air 2. Transmission of sound waves through solid structures 3. The performance acoustics in the room you finally construct So, a)make sure your new framework is isolated from the original structure by neoprene strips or if ...


0

I don't know how far along you are, and I've never installed a shower, but I have installed a few bathtubs from scratch, and I assume the principles are the same. I frame the enclosure to allow 1/4" extra all around, i.e for a 60" long tub I frame the opening 60-1/2" long. I make sure the corners are as square as I can get them, and the walls are straight ...


2

Shower pan is always first because you want the top of the shower pan to the edge of the green board. So there may be shimming involved to get the walls not only lined up with the pan but as close as you can to perpendicular. I am not going to argue with your installers because I have had some large sheets of granite and marble installed for showers but I ...


5

A good drywall adhesive has much more shear strength than screws - and this is just when your glue is on the framing. So if you are doubling up the drywall gluing makes a ton of sense. Just recently my drywall guys started using glue and I can say this, I hope I never have to demo these places because the drywall is ATTACHED. All this being said the ...


3

I would knock that sucker out with impunity. If it is to serve some purpose, it most likely would not be code compliant. Fire blocking is the first thing that comes to mind, but it is only in one stud section.


0

You are most likely referring to Cross bridging or blocking. They must be installed to keep the joists from twisting.


0

One coat of base coat Durabond 90 and one coat of regular 90 mud. First you have to knock down the high spots with a scraper. The 90 is a mud you have to mix yourself; it's made by Sheetrock brand.


2

Most anything can be repaired with enough time, money, materials and skill. Sheetrock, however, is one of the cheapest building materials we use, so when it comes to repairing wall and ceiling surfaces, typically the cheapest/easiest solution is to just re-sheetrock.


2

Like drywall, many types of wood paneling come in 4' x 8' panels. That means you should have seams with finishing nails along every third stud. You could try carefully popping out a few nails in the middle of a panel to see what's behind it. If you're careful enough, you can just tap the nails back in when you're done. But use caution: those finishing nails ...


2

Drill a screw in the wall. Pull it out. See if it has white flakes on it.


7

If there are electrical outlets, remove one and look. otherwise you need to remove a section of panelling or drill a hole and observe what comes out. Odds are pretty good it's just panelling, speaking to typical practices in garage remodels.


0

Not really an aswer, but I can't put a picture in a comment. Tain't Liquid Nails brand, but here's what Homely has on offer, and it is right around $45/case of 12 (don't recall if they sell it not by the case:) Works good, doesn't stink too much (low VOC.)


1

Yes you can. I have my guys use Liquid Nails for ceilings. We still add screws but not really sure you HAVE TO. Definitely nothing wrong with using the correct adhesive for a few studs on a piece of drywall.


0

weve prepcoated drywall.and even putty coated drywall.and checkout with a 500 watt light.sideways on the dry wall.to show all defects.and still primed the walls.or the paint can burn though your prep coat.and you will still half to paint again.or spray more prep coat.always use a good primer.


1

The first issue is the moisture in the concrete - where is moisture coming from? Is the foundation sealed correctly? Even if you're dealing with drainage, you need to make sure that the basement has a proper incline (and make sure that the floor is sealed) directing the moisture towards the drain. This is a good place to start: ...


2

As Jack explains in his answer, the problem seems to be that the rough-in deflects upward as you are pushing the trim in and then returns to its at rest position after the trim is in place. The trick is to keep the rough-in from moving upward. Consider drilling two small holes about an inch above the bottom lip and on opposite sides of the rough-in. Attach ...


3

The symptom of the gap you have in all my experience with recess lights have been the rough in housing has room for deflection. As you push the trim in place, the rough in pushes up also under the tension of the lens going in and it stays pushed up until the lens bottoms out on the ceiling and is released. The housing relaxes back down and creates the gap. ...


1

One way to get you siding off the concrete floor would be to trim it up 1/2 to 3/4 inch with a sonic crafter or something like that. You could then caulk the sill. I'd wait until it dries up a bit first.



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