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0

EDIT*** It is a steel stud. This is actually very bad news. Steel drywall studs are sheet metal, not structural iron. They are designed to hold up drywall, using the very sharp-tipped drywall screws, and not much else. They typically don't have enough strength to take a large drill bit without buckling, and you will get the standard thin-metal messy ...


0

If you are inserting wood backing into a finished wall please be aware you may be able to do so from the opposite side of the wall. Especially if doing so will be easier for the installer, make less mess, and be less conspicuous. If you are hanging an articulating arm for use with a 55" TV, toggles, hollow wall anchors, moly bolts, ZipItsĀ®, SpinInsĀ®, or ...


14

Do not use drywall anchors to hang a TV that large on a swivel mount. If it was a mount that didn't have motion, I might say that's acceptable, but not with a swivel mount. You will need to use wood in some form to add the necessary strength. Plywood can be attached to the wall studs using 3-1/2" lag bolts with fender washers. To provide a clean finish, ...


4

Plywood would work well, but may not provide the nicest of aesthetics. A 1x3 board (or thicker/wider) at least 25 inches long would provide more than adequate load capacity and convenience of attachment points. Depending on the bracket mount, perhaps two such boards would be needed to attach upper and lower points and keep the bracket parallel to the wall. ...


0

For small nicks and holes, put a light coat of primer on first, then you'll see all the indentations a lot better. Then fill in your marks.


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I just finished wiring a home that was built with the ICF. What I did was start at one corner of the home and measured how far from a certain corner each vertical wiring run was, how far from the floor (or ceiling) each horizontal run was depending which one it was closer to. I also indicated the length of each run and beginning and end. I did the same for ...


1

From the picture you've posted it seems to me that the real problem is the plumbing of the pipes to the towel rail that needs to be sorted out. You'll probably have to cut a bigger hole in the wall to do this anyway, so what I'd do is mark a squared off rectangle that has it's vertical edges on the studs. Use a sharp knife and a metal straight edge to cut ...


0

If your insurance company gave you money to repair a plaster ceiling with drywall - they are probably just trying to get of as cheap as possible, and hoping to get away with it. Joining the two systems together or even replacing the entire ceiling with drywall - is usually much more labor intensive, than just plastering the damaged section and blending it ...


1

Take a paint stir stick from a home improvement center, break it into pieces that will fit behind the patch hole, and pop in a screw to hold it in place, on the side away from the tile. It doesn't have to be rock solid, it's purpose is to keep the drywall patch in place long enough for the compound to dry. Once the patch is in place (liberally buttered with ...


3

Depending on the thickness of the existing plaster, a drywall patch with suitable support behind it (with "mud" or patching compound over it to merge the edges with existing plaster and achieve a smooth surface) may be a perfectly reasonable solution. Getting it really smooth and level so the patch doesn't "telegraph" through the wallpaper will take some ...


1

I'm not sure what the fire barrier is specifically but in general you should be able to mount a floating top in this situation without any problems. You can do angle brackets, z clips, or ledgers(by far the easiest). The hardest part is going to be scribe-ing in all three sides to your walls. One trick is to do the ledger, paint it to match your walls, then ...


2

As DMoore notes, a simple ledger would work well. If you want something that isn't visible, buy yourself a Kreg pocket screw jig like this one. Cut a few 2x4 to hold it up at the right spot, and then you can just screw it right in. I would try to use 2 screws per 2x4 to increase the strength.


5

I would just buy a 1x4 or similar material that would go with your butcher block and use them as a ledger board on the three sides. Simply measure the height you want, attach ledger board to wall all the way around (3 easy cuts) and attach them to the studs. Then just slide on your butcher block. To attach to ledger you can use screws but a little ...


4

I'd use joint compound, and smooth it in with a putty knife as smoothly as possible. Then, when it's dry, use a damp sponge to smooth it over to a paintably smooth surface.


1

The commonly recommended solution is to find the wood the ceiling was screwed into (using a studfinder, or a magnet to find those screws), and screw the hanging hardware into that. That avoids questions of whether the plasterboard can take the weight, whether there's space behind the board to maneuver your proposed anchor, etc. A small hole is not hard to ...


1

You might have answered your own question... what about a (larger) needle? Tie the fishing wire round the middle of the needle (and perhaps use a dab of glue to hold it in place if it won't hold itself). If you can't find a large enough needle, try a small gauge knitting needle? Again it might need a dab of glue to hold the wire in place in the centre.


1

It's hard to tell from the picture but it looks like it was tile mounted to a wood board. Wood is one of the worst materials for behind the sink. If going to replace with tile, use a concrete backer board instead and consider using tile trim caps to cover the top. Otherwise use a solid stone or stone like material. And make sure the caulking is in good ...


3

While you can rehydrate mud, the rehydrated stuff you make will not perform acceptably. The reason is in the binder, the stuff that makes it harden and stick to the wall. This is usually polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). For reference, see the USG Sheetrock all-purpose joint compound MSDS, which lists "vinyl alcohol polymer" as an ingredient. PVA is water soluble, ...


0

The only correct way to fix it, IMHO, is to get some paper drywall tape, and embed it in some setting-type (the powdered kind that you mix with water yourself) compound. Do not use the pre-mixed, and do not use fiberglass drywall tape. In my experience, any other method will eventually open-up on you.


2

Unfortunately you cannot re-wet drywall compound and get a usable product. It will break down in to a rough slurry, but the consistency will never be smooth enough to get a descent finish. I have to admit, however, that's where my knowledge ended, so I had to ask myself... why? Why doesn't it just turn back into the mud from whence it came. So to satisfy ...


0

I won't say whether or not these issues are significant because there's always a possibility that they could hint at more sinister problems. But I will say that, if you find a house that's more than five years old that doesn't have a little movement in the floor and few cracks in the drywall: buy it. Because it's the only one in the world. Houses settle, ...


6

Drywall mud is so darn cheap, why would you do this? That said, I actually tried this myself one time because I was temporarily without a car to get to the store, and I was impatient. I managed to get it to a somewhat workable consistency, but no matter what I did, I couldn't get the lumps out of it. I think if I'd let it sit and re-hydrate over a longer ...


2

Consider using a paintable latex caulk. Apply a very small amount then work it into the length of the crack with a finger. Wipe off all excess with a damp rag or sponge, then paint. It is a good method requiring no sanding. If your ceiling is painted with flat (no gloss) paint, as most are, you will not be able to see it when you are done.


1

How big an area? If it is small, can you replace the studs with pine? Cut the old out with a Sawzall. You could also use drywall adhesive.


1

If you're not snapping the heads off (torque), your drill just doesn't cut it. If you're stripping the heads, you're not pushing hard enough (under powered drills require more pressure to avoid this and also lose torque towards the end, helping you snap the heads off). If the drywall pops, use two or more screws 2-3" apart, slowly sinking each one to ...


1

I suspect the studs are really hard old-growth wood Lubricating screws can really help when driving them into wood. I've seen various lubricants suggested. For exterior projects I've used LM grease and petroleum jelly (vaseline) but I'm not sure if there are any problems using either in your situation. The other common solution is to drill pilot holes ...


-1

Someone never installed a 6 mil vapour barrier so the ceiling condenses moisture and rots the drywall out.


0

I've filled large gaps in new installation drywall as my house is old, not square, and has some very unusual shapes. They've stood up 20 years without issue. If there is backing behind the drywall, such as a stud, just start filling it in. Let it dry between coats. If you have a situation where there is no backing such as between wall studs, start by ...


-5

I do punch-list for a busy builder... i have patched many many holes in walls (after having to move receptacles, after plumbers cut a hole in wall to make a repair ect... from 2"x4" to 10"x8'...). I never use tape! Never had to go back and redo any patches! I use durabond 20 min mud... and of course use strips of wood to screw my patch to before mudding!



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