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1

I realize this answer is 4 years after the question but concrete-form walls have a tendency to stick around for a good long time, so... The concrete form system in the house I am building has vertical plastic strips spaced at 8" on center and running within about 1" of the top and bottom of the form. (So if you look and or dig from the top you won't see it ...


4

Assuming you have fixed the water problem (if not, give up), why not simply attach drywall directly to the entire surface. You may be able to adhere it with construction adhesive. If not, use screws, if necessary, with anchors behind them. If it is available, consider moisture resistant drywall or even paperless. You can then put on any surface finish you ...


2

Once dry, brush marks will not go away without sanding...sorry. Once that is done though: When you paint any given space you should move precisely and quickly. So in this case when you cut out the space in your kitchen (brushing the edges) you should immediately (before the cut work dries) go over it with the roller and get the roller as close to the edge ...


0

If you sand and prime over the part that has brush marks, you could try using a pad trim painter. You won't get brush marks, but you may drive yourself crazy trying to make it look good, since the pad won't look the same as the roller on the rest of the wall.


1

Dark colors and metallics do not cover well as they do not have the pigment (titanium dioxide) that blocks out underlying colors . The use of high quality applicators (brushes and rollers) is critical for ensuring a high quality final finish. Buy a good paintbrush that will deliver an even coating application and you should see those brush marks disappear. ...


1

Why not just measure the height of your bracket and keep note of it, then next time mount it a few inches higher or lower so you don't risk hitting the same spots? I suppose you could also plot the X,Y co-ordinates from a corner of the wall and mark those spots to avoid when you move back.


5

Chip away the drywall over the hole and install a Stud Plate. These are designed to stop anyone from drilling into a wire that runs through a stud. Patch the drywall. Next time, if you can't find the location, and accidentally drill in the same spot, you'll hit the stud plate.


0

Unless the gypsum board is attached directly to the underside of the roof sheathing, it is not a roofing nail. If the gypsum board is attached directly to the underside of the roof sheathing, then there are larger quality of construction issues than a protruding nail.


7

Looks to me like a drywall screw or nail has "bubbled out". It happens sometimes due to wall movement, especially with weather swings (like a real wet winter or a long drought). It also happens when moisture gets to a nail or screw and causes it to corrode. Hopefully your kinda new roof is not leaking. I don't see any signs of plaster discoloration ...


2

That looks suspiciously like somebody decided to cut a door through the wall and either gave up or decided it was too much work. The wall construction looks like veneer plaster, which would fit with the age of the house. Whatever method you decide to use, you're going to have to get some more framing in there. You at very least would need to replace the ...


3

Where is the water damage relative to the exterior ground level? I note in the outside picture that there is significant slope to the ground - if the ground on the uphill and slope-side sides is not shaped to move water away from and around the house, it would be likely that there would be water damage on the lower parts of the walls from water flowing over ...


2

This seems to be a design and/or shopping question, that is completely dependent on personal preference. You could trim the hole out with wood, some type of metal or plastic flange, some type of port hole from a ship (if you're going for a nautical theme), etc. The options are only limited by your imagination.


0

I guess I don't understand the problem. If you are making a projection port, why would it look funny? The standard professional projection window is fairly innocuous, even when used with a humongous projector: (From http://neiloseman.com/?p=3222) Here are two which are much larger than you might use for your application: (From ...


1

How about you get straight edged drywall for the back layer so you don't have to worry about the tapered edge?


0

Since you say the doors only stick in the winter, that would lean more towards the humidity/temp changes you mention. As for the cracks, could be part of that, could be from just natural settling of the home over time. As to things to do about it, I'd just point you to an easily found article on the net where someone else has already gone through the ...


10

You raise a number of issues. How to fill an irregularly shaped hole? To cut drywall (or any panel) to an exact shape with non parallel sides is hard. So what we usually do is make the hole regular. You can trim away some of the remaining drywall, preferably so the edge runs along the middle of a stud, parallel to another stud or the corner. Then cut a ...


3

Freestanding steel studs are fine (assuming they are anchored to a sill and top plate). Steel studs anchored to the furring strips are fine. Why wouldn't steel studs anchored to the furring strips, plaster and lath be fine? The only limitation would be if the lath and plaster had significant bowing or hollowing in spots that the new studs came in contact ...


2

It sounds like you want to keep using the existing holes, which by now are quite stripped and loose. As mentioned in the comments, for a shelf you almost certainly want to fasten it to studs. However it is possible (though not advisable) to have a shallow, light shelf supported by drywall. So if you are unwilling to mount to studs, consider using ...


2

While that is a fairly ugly hanging job - I've finished worse. As long as he's not milking you for money, while he works, it might be worth it to stick it out. You're paying for the finished work, not how he makes it there. To answer the question - Yes, it is possible to smooth over those imperfections. The corner will get bead, the outlets will get covers, ...


4

1/4" drywall will readily bend into a radius and is available at the big box stores. 2 layers of that with glue between the framing and the 2nd layer. A 2X4, as long as the sheet with a few short 2X to hold it while you screw it in place. It must be tight to the framing before you run screws into it to hold it.


1

This video has a great section on installing board on a curve. It will most likely depend on the board size. The link includes the start time of 34m40s. How to Hang Drywall


2

Around here (PNW), two layers of 3/8 inch drywall applied one at a time and overlapping so no seams coincide is the easy way to do it. Two layers are needed for fire code in the modern world to give a full 60 minute burn-through time. I have seen 1/2 inch installed in curves of maybe 24 inch diameter by experienced professionals who prepared by leaving it ...


0

You could install strips of drywall to approximate the curve as facets, then fill in the corners to create a smooth curve during the taping/plastering process. Or use something more flexible than drywall to create that curved surface (make sure it meets code!), and count on the difference being invisible after it's been painted. I think that's the approach ...


4

My crews going back 20 years have always done ceilings before walls. Tester has a really good answer that discusses the blocking issue but misses what I feel is the biggest piece of advice. And that is leaving the perimeter of your ceiling drywall floating over the last 8-12 inches. You would not be able to do this without the walls holding up the ...


0

The biggest issue is gravity and taping. When installing the first coat of taping compound, you are putting the corner compound directly up, then covering with paper. As it dries, it creates a bump as it settles down. If you put up the ceiling first, your taping compound is filling in the joint above the wall piece, with the wall holding up the compound as ...


0

There are many reasons to put the ceilings up first. I can't think of one not to. Most construction is time tested over years. It is unwise to go against the flow else your jobs become problematic. I have found that out the hard way many times. So stick with the program.


0

Doing the ceiling first is for fire safety. Fires go up, if you do the walls first then the vertical gaps left when you do the ceiling allow fires to directly heat the beams. If you do the ceiling first the gaps are horizontal and help control the spread of fire.


6

Is it possible to fix it? yes, but there is an awful lot of work to be done in order to do so. Each of those gaps has to be filled with mud and covered with tape. Given the shrinkage that occurs as mud dries, most of them are going to require several layers to fill properly. In particular, filling in around the ceiling fixture is likely to be problematic ...


39

If you do the walls first, you can end up with drywall that is unsupported along an entire edge. Taking these walls for example. Walls First If you add drywall to the walls. Then add drywall to the ceiling. The ceiling drywall will be unsupported along the entire length of the one wall. Ceiling First Given the same walls. If you add drywall to ...



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