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0

When tasked with the a similar problem, I chose to square the wall up with the existing framing. My wall was out of plum, and out of square - I shimmed it floor to ceiling, corner to corner.


2

That looks like nearly 3/4 inch in a 2 foot run. That is a lot of angle, and I think most carpenters would consider it unacceptable on a new framing job (unless there were some underlying issue, like a pipe or an old beam preventing a square outcome). But it also sounds like your contractor is challenged when it comes to getting something square. You can ...


6

Aluminum wont help much, unless it is quite thick. It will bend easily, without distributing the weight evenly over the extra anchors. If you go with a non articulating mount, so the monitor is against the wall, you may be able to get away with strong drywall anchors. With an articulating mount I wouldnt risk it. I would get a small piece of cheap but ...


0

Try this, Mud, use minimum pressure on the corner trowel to level the mud, remove extra from the trowel, embed the tape by hand and then use the corner trowel to fully embed the tape and smooth your edges.


6

You'll be fine, though you might want to go buy a bag of setting type (dry powder, mix with water - sets, rather than drying out like the stuff in a bucket) joint compound, both because it's the right type for use with mesh tape, and becasue of this tid-bit from USG: Open spaces between panels of 6.4 mm (1/4􏰀) or more should be filled with compound at ...


0

I used rulers. I premeasured and predrilled holes for the mounting. Next, I added holes in the ruler above and below the properly measured holes. Through the above and below holes I strung gardening wire. I used ample wire. I cleaned up the hole with an exacto knife. At that point I slid the ruler into the wall through the hole (just large enough for ...


1

You definitely should install an exhaust vent in the room for humidity and buy a quiet one so you will actually use it. But if you don't it will be like every other 6'-0"x5'-6" laundry room with a vent that is not on; point is not the end of the world. As for the rest, install your required utities and fixtures for the appliances (power, water, sewer, ...


2

All dryers need a vent. Gas and electric dryers need a vent to the outside of the house to allow all the moisture to escape from the dryer. All-in-one washer/dryer combo units don't need an air vent, but need a water drain to remove the water from the drying stage (which you need anyways to drain the wash cycle). The walls are irrelevant. So don't worry ...


1

We are doing mostly option 3 right now in our house, but in our case, we are pulling the trim down to strip the paint on the trim, and clean up the walls. (100 years of paint, varnish and some neglect). It's not terrible to pull the trim, and I think it will make the rest of the job so much easier. Just be cautious with the window apron (underneath the ...


5

One of the main purposes of moldings, such as the trim around doors and windows (called casings), is to act as a barrier and seal to wind and water intrusion. Moldings on wall between vertical boards, called battens served a similar purpose. The decorative element was an extra benefit (unless you are an extreme modernist/minimalist who wants totally flat ...


0

Yes, tape. I prefer the sticky fiberglass tape, especially for patches. First I cut a patch. I create a square one because its easier to tape. After cutting the patch, I lay it across the hole and mark where the drywall needs to be cut. Many times its good to cut a little extra out because the drywall has cracked on the back side. Then cut the old drywall ...


0

From a lot of trial and error adventures I found the following to work. Cut a patching piece of drywall roughly square, somewhat larger than the hole you are trying to repair. Then, holding the patch so it covers the hole, draw a pencil line around the patch then cut along the pencil line to make the hole match the patch. Take a relatively thin but wide ...


1

A hole that size should be taped to prevent cracking. You don't need to use tape though. Another method uses the patch piece of drywall's paper: Square the opening to be patched. Cut a pice of drywall about 4" x 4" larger then the hole. Score the back side of the patch piece of drywall along lines 1 & 2, about 2" in from the end. Place the drywall face ...


1

I've always taped repairs in drywall that require patches. I can't give you a great answer as to why other than I've always been told without taping, eventually the joint compound will crack. I've never personally tested that theory. This thread might offer insight.


2

Gypsum board will not support a glass door, unless the door is tiny (like a 6" square). You will need a frame which goes all around the opening and is secured to a structural member, like a stud. Then the door is attached with hinges to the frame and a latch or latches are installed on the other side of the frame.


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There's metal corner bead under the finished surface. It will be more difficult to screw into than drywall alone. Put the screw more than an inch away from the corner and you should be fine. As a renter, just make sure you remove the curtain and patch and paint the holes you made when you need to leave.


2

The best situation here would be to make the plywood plate large enough so that it spans across at least two studs. This will determine the horizontal span of the plywood. The vertical span should be not less than about 0.75 times the horizontal span. The plywood material needs to be hefty enough to be able to take the fasteners needed for the arm assembly. ...


3

You can use whatever materials you would normally use. A "zero clearance" fireplace means wood and other burnable materials can be safely adjacent and touching the fireplace. The fireplace internally isolates the heat box from the casing with free flowing air to keep the outer casing cool. If there was sheetrock there before and the rest of the room uses ...


0

It sounds to me like the internal wall construction is made of cinder blocks. These drill easily as you describe and a hole drilled into the wall would have likely entered into the hollow cavity of the cinder block. I would strongly discourage you from trying to mount these brackets to such a wall as there is no good assurance that a strong pulling force ...


5

This sounds like old school plaster on metal mesh, common for that era in apartments and condos. Hard as a rock. However, you'd have to open up the wall to find the concrete block that's most likely behind it, because the plaster is only supported by furring strips tacked into the blocks with nails. Do not be fooled if your stud-finder scores a hit. Don't be ...


0

Do you suppose your walls are covered with something similar to this? http://www.aliexpress.com/item/Fiber-Cement-Board/1291501553.html It doesn't sound like the wall covering is structural. There must be studs in the wall. You could try a stud finder device like you can find at your local DIY store. You could try using toggle bolts. If you do, I would do ...


1

While the usual trick for super-flat butt joints is to set the gap between studs (see the first answer in Should drywall be hung horizontally or vertically? for an excellent description), it doesn't seem like your situation would work for this. Sadly, the best advice is to get a 10 or 12" taping knife and feather, feather, feather. (I personally wouldn't ...


0

First I don't totally disagree with Tyler but his answer is a bit ridiculous. Only a concrete salesman would tell you to repour your foundation due to hairline cracks in drywall. Maybe the issue has something to do with the foundation shifting seasonally. But all houses move a little throughout weather changes - humidity and temp. It is virtually ...


0

After the repair section has dried, apply a thin coat of mud over it. Now get a wet sponge and pat over the wet mud. This will remove any seams and make it look like it blends in better. Good luck! Let us know what you ultimately use that worked for you.


1

Like any other drywall patch - there IS a raised area where the tape is. But you feather compound out 6-12" and there is no NOTICEABLE raised area, as the deviation from "exactly flat" is too small for the eye to see. Tape with a 4" knife. Re-coat with an 8" knife. Finish with a 12" knife.


1

It may be better to mount from ceiling joists if at all possible, or else use a free-standing solution as suggested by Keshlam's comment. RC mounting on walls is meant to be flexible enough to absorb vibration, so mounting to those walls would either nullify the purpose of having RC mounted walls, or damage the drywall by exceeding it's structural capacity.



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