New answers tagged

1

Since the wood is apt to move a little, I suggest you use "tear away bead", and maybe apply some painter's caulk after a season if you see any gaps. The alternative would be flat taping, but that depends on a pretty close fit between the drywall and the timber.


0

i am assuming that the situation you are describing is drywall on furring strips on concrete (so there is a 3/4" or so gap between the drywall and the concrete). if its drywall directly on concrete, see the first answer. if its the latter than see below. the issue is always with a railing the loading of the railing on the brackets causes crushing of the ...


0

You can drill holes into the concrete with bits made for concrete. Depending on how dense the concrete is you can sometimes do this with a regular drill. (This takes some patience, it's not like drilling into wood. Don't push too hard or you'll break the bit. Just have patience) If the concrete is too dense, a hammer drill may be necessary. And yes they have ...


2

None of the pictures in your question necessarily point at a foundation issue. You have cracks in your drywall. What could cause these? The first picture is a screw or nail that wasn't set in the drywall properly. This means nothing. The other pictures could be poor drywall techniques. You just bought the house so you never lived through a winter. ...


0

On the pictures, I see little of real concern there. But. Your description and things there are not pictures of you have described do set off the alarms. You need a Licensed Professional Civil Engineer - one working directly for you, who's only financial incentive is that you pay for the consultation/examination.


2

If you are sanding the paper tape, you definitely need more mud. So put on more mud. Removing it would not really help, it would just make more of a mess you have to mud over. I suggest 3-4", 6-8" and 12" for a progression in drywall "knives" (a coat with the small one, knock off only the high points, a coat with the medium one, knock off only the high ...


0

I recently prepped two rooms for primer and paint. I read that the best prep is to use water and sponge as you did. It was not so much the drywall compound dust, as the thin coating of kaolin the drywall manufacturer uses to keep sheets from sticking together that the water will take off. I currently have a garage ceiling to scrape, mud, and prime, that ...


2

While the mud is still wet, any knife stroke will slide the tape if not enough squeezing force is applied. What this squeezing does is press the excess mud from behind the tape; the less wet mud, the more friction between the tape and the drywall facing, and the less sliding/wrinkling is possible. I have never used a corner trowel for taping, and I think ...


0

If you wish to do what the building code requires, it must be taped in a garage. On top of that, I would tape anything that has an actual gap or drilled holes. Paper tape is a good old reliable material to use, but I prefer fiberglass tape, it is thinner, does not need a bed coat and holds itself on walls and ceilings without that bed coat.


1

I'd say yes, you need tape. I like the fiberglass mesh tape. It also self-sticking. I put strips of it over the joints before putting on any mud.


0

Screw your backing plate to the inside wall (3/4 inch plywood strips won't splinter when screws grab into it). Slather the edges of the plug with joint compound and push into place and secure with screws. Apply more compound over the plugged surface. Cover seams with tape and press into place to force out excess compound. Using a wider blade apply a second ...


2

I think the question you're asking is whether the joint compound will crack around the plugs if you don't tape the joint. Probably. But that depends on: How well you replace the plugs. If you don't center them perfectly, leaving uniform gaps, the joint compound has nowhere to go in the tight spots and you're left with a paper-thin skin on the surface ...


1

My thoughts the same about drywall @Comintern, to make up the 1.5 it would be easiest to attach 2x4's sideways. If this is now a inside room I would remove the old exterior siding, However the “cement shingles” look like the asbestos type commonly used you might want to have them tested prior to working with them for health reasons. I don’t think I would ...


0

I am happy to report back that after 1 hour (part of it is because I am a newbie), I was able to remove these 8 nails. Tools used: flat head screwdriver, hammer and a 9-inch pry bar. The wall cans are only 14 inches wide. Hammer and screwdriver to create the gap and pry bar goes in to finish the job (only figured that out after I was done with 3 nails).


1

Looks like that wall can is attached with nails instead of screws. A pry bar will be your best bet to remove it. Hope that helps! Let us know if you have any more questions.


0

Do you think it is safe to screw into the wall in the spots indicated? (as it is close to power socket) UK Regulations mandate that wires to power sockets must run vertically down to the floor or up to the ceiling or may run horizontally if close to the ceiling. You need an electrical wiring detector - it will tell you exactly where the wires run. ...


3

It is more than likely that those are large nails into the framing lumber to the side of the heater housing. There would be a number of ways to remove those. Use a Dremel tool with a cutoff wheel to cut the head off the nail. Then you can use a nail set or punch to drive the remaining body of the nail further into the side stud to allow the housing to ...


2

Shelves like the one described can carry a significant load and things are regularly being put on and off, increasing the dynamic load. Unfortunately, from the illustration (and the appearance of the listed item on the sellers website), there are only two screw holes at each end. This puts a serious load on each attachment point. Plasterboard or even ...


0

Setting-type joint compounds don't tend to feather out as well as water-based compounds, especially if they're not mixed extremely carefully. They're likely to leave a ragged edge requiring much more sanding than should be necessary. Also, per the spec sheet for the product: Do not use setting-type joint compounds for thin skim coats. If setting-type ...


1

The easy sand is a "light-weight" compound which is why it sands so easily. If you ever sanded this type of compound you'd see why it shouldn't be applied in thin layers. It sands off very easily. If it is applied as a skim coat it wouldn't last 1 or 2 passes with your sander. You will see this frequently on all types of wall patching products. If it has ...


0

Usually the year the house was built is a good way to start, but if the drywall was added as a renovation, the date stamp is on the back side of the sheets. If you can get access, say in an attic space and move insulation if needed will get you there. If the back is not accessible at all, then removal of a big enough piece will show you that. Mind you, the ...


0

I was inspired by ojait's inlay answer and combined it with the TapCon recommendation. I got four pieces of 2" x 1" x 10" green-treated plywood and glued two pairs together using silicone. I placed the mount against the wall and outlined the screw hole locations, then laid each plywood inlay over four end screwhole outlines and outlined the plywood. ...


0

The industry standards, the ANSI/IICRC S520 Standard of Care for professional mold remediation, generally stipulates removal of 24" around the visibly moldy area. We would also generally remove any other wet drywall. If you see visible mold on the room facing side of the drywall, the likelihood of the problem being worse inside the walls is high.


3

It looks like one layer of paper has separated from the other. The paper surrounding the tearout has loose flaps of paper around it too. Remove all loose paper and give a tight skim coat or two of paste spackle, sand smooth, prime and paint. You will be wise to get a 4" drywall knife to help in this. The little 1" knife that is considered a putty knife ...


0

I misinterpreted the photos. On my small monitor set for night mode, it looked like a couple holes all the way through the sheetrock. This answer explains how to patch holes in the sheetrock: Which do you want? Good Cut a rectangular section out of the wall which includes both holes. It is easier if both the left side and the right side of the hole ...


3

I have seen this done. There is no special trim. Steps: Install trim Take a utility knife and scribe around the trim exactly. take out enough drywall layer to set trim - some guys just take off the paper mud and sand where needed after reinstalling flush trim Does it look better? Debatable. Is it worth it? Almost in all cases no. Note: My opinion ...


2

One thing the trim does typically is hide the edge of the drywall which usually, one would not want to look at because it's rough and ugly. It's hard to imagine trim that doesn't extend (at least the thickness of the metal itself) below the surface of the ceiling. If you want a trimless look, what you will probably need to do is apply drywall compound up ...


2

Fire rated drywall, if the ceiling is required to have this installed, must be installed for the entire ceiling of the given room. This helps provide a means of slowing a fire from reaching the room above it. Make sure you understand, by no means will this stop a fire from advancing it will only slow its progress in order to give occupants more time to exit ...


2

Drywall (or sheetrock) on the ceiling is installed tight against the wall framing with hopefully less than 1/2" gap. Any gap larger than this removes the support you'll provide later. The drywall installed on the walls is next installed on the top half of the wall pressed against the ceiling drywall which gives it support. Then the bottom half of the ...


-1

Good evening. I believe you can hang it horizontally vertically or diagonal. It doesn't matter which way it's installed. A competent finisher can make any install proper. The most convenient method of install should be applied accounting for waste and practicality.


20

Luckily I just happened to have one of my own to do (in my case repairing plaster around an old work box, but exactly the same process), so I'll give a walk-through of repairing the gap on the left: What I usually do is fill the gap with wads of rolled up fiberglass joint tape: Pack the wads of fiberglass into the gap (I'm using a screwdriver because ...


5

The reason that drywall is enjoyable to do (for me anyway) is that most mistakes can quickly and easily be repaired. This is true in your situation. Cutting a precise opening is sometimes difficult. The fastest way to cover the gaps, after wider wall plates, is to re-fill the gaps with joint compound if they are not larger than in the first photo. For the ...


15

Easiest way - buy bigger covers. Best way - redrywall so it is done right. Half-ass way - tape and mud the gaps. Outlet covers for really bad drywallers


1

This answer assumes the countertop doesn't have an integral (pre-formed) back splash. In order to move the countertop back to have the entire edge touching the wall you will need to scribe a line. To scribe a cut line you must first get a scribe. This is nothing more than a compass, but one leg has a holder for a pencil ( the other leg is pointed). To ...



Top 50 recent answers are included