New answers tagged

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I had a water leak and was glad I had wood paneling which dried nicely. If I had sheetrock I probably would have to pay somebody to replace it. FYI, I'm currently painting the wood paneling and to not show the grooves I spackle and sand the grooves three times. Looks great and you can't even see any of the grooves.


8

"Why is this happening?" The drywall mud was applied too thick "what should I do about it?" Either apply additional thin coats (sanding between each), or scrape it down and start over, this time using several thinner applications and sanding between each


3

Drywall compound shrinks as it dries, so if applied thick or if it has too much water it will crack. A few cracks on the first coat are ok since later coats will fill the cracks. From the image it appears the first coat here is much thicker than needed. Excess mud on any layer will just mean more work and more sanding later. Ideally the first coat should ...


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The closeup looks like cement based backer board used to hold tile in wet/damp locations. If so, that is not original. It would be very hard to restore to lathe/plaster throughout, especially if sections are missing. The transition points for repairs tend to crack and show lines. Also, wire mesh is used more than wood lath today. Finding a skilled plasterer ...


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You can use spacer shims, they're available at most electrical supply, hardware, and big box stores. They're also available from various manufacturers.


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Various products are available specifically for leveling a device in an oversized opening, such as this bracket. Selection at big box stores may be limited, go to an electrical supply house if you can't find similar.


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I'd go ahead and paint it as-is, just as I'd paint my living room after a year, or ten, without any special prep. Kitchens with evidence of grease should probably be cleaned locally. I've never had paint fall off yet after dozens of personal and professional projects over several decades. Modern paints are very good.


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Clean it well (e.g. with a TSP substitute). Assuming it is still adhering OK to the drywall, there is no reason to sand or prime again.


3

The only real answer can be "as long as it takes". There are so many variables that affect how easily the water will evaporate that you can't predict. Could be hours in some situations, could be months in others. You need to figure out how to measure how much water is left. You might consider buying a moisture content meter; there are ones with pins that ...


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I'm not sure if there's a moisture barrier specifically that goes in between the paint and the wall of the bathroom, but there are paints that are made to withstand high humidity. Also, semi-gloss seems to be the finish of choice because it is better at resisting stains and moisture which are common problems for bathrooms.


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It should be fine all on its own, but if you want to be really really totally sure, just sand a bit to expose some of the CMU surface in the high areas.


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Doesn't look to me that you need furring strips Just cut over to next stud then don't be stupid with utility knife, use a strait edge to slowly trim away remaining 3/4 in. of drywall on that stud. It is best to go a little bit at a time until you reach the wood. And remove any screws you may run into there. Be sure to clean up any loose material on the edges ...


1

I generally agree with Ed Beal regarding lumber quality. My personal standards wouldn't allow use of such lumber. Regarding your question... For field studs, as little as half an inch should be fine. Much smaller than that and the sheet will begin to deform around the sharpened edge of the lumber when the screws are set, causing waves in the wall and ...


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"Wane" is the area on a edge of a board where the bark may have been but flaked so the edge is not a full flat surface. In today's high recovery saw mills the lower grades may have wane on all 4 sides of a 4x4" because the tree top was not much larger than that. Not all lumber is safe for building it should have a stamp on it stating the grade. In my state ...


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Typically you attach the curtain hardware into the stud framing around the window, the only reason to add any extra wood to mount the brackets is if you need to move the bracket out from the wall to get clear of any window trim, or if the hardware must be installed somewhere that doesn't have any studs behind it and you use the wood piece to span the space ...


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It sounds like you may have metal studs. That would explain the difficulty drilling through, followed by the void beyond.


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No. A couple weeks ago when i was drywall mudding my room I thought of the idea, and i decided to try and find out immediately rather than ask the internet and wait. I don't recommend trying. First there were immediate delivery problems, hand tools suddenly starts looking alot more practical. The plaster is far too thick & heavy for the gun to shoot. ...


3

What you used originally is what it used every day by professionals, handymen and DIYers alike. A drywall gun with fine thread drywall screws. For heavier studs drill-point drywall screws can be used. If what you did works for you then keep at it. It's just a lot slower than a drywall gun. So if this is just for you and small projects there is nothing wrong ...


1

I've found it to be easier to just tear out the plaster and drywall it. It's a lot more work but in my run-ins with plaster in old structures it was always a pain. I would drywall it; it will save you hassle in the future.


1

Even if you use a remote, you should keep the switches. Most remote control fan/light combos allow you to turn on the light by flicking the switch off then back on. Think about it from the perspective of a guest or a paramedic: you walk through a door and expect a wall switch to be right there, and flip it once or more times to get the light to come on. And ...


1

Inventing a lighting control system only you and family know how to control would frustrate intruders, but it would also frustrate first responders. And guests. To me, it violates a basic tenet of architectural design, which is that a home and its features should feel comfortable and accessible. Lighting is part of what makes a space habitable. You know ...


3

A perfect drywall job isn't an option, as you're not allowed to cover junction boxes or otherwise render them inaccessible. In the case of those switches which share a box with switches for other lights, you can find partial blank plates. However, these won't accomplish your goal of cleaning up the walls. In all cases you can nut the broken circuit legs ...


0

Maybe they have it in other parts of the country, but I have never seen fireproof drywall in any size but 5/8" in New England. Oddly I once had a U.S, Gypsum Handbook that said 1/2" drywall takes 1 hour + or - to burn through.


2

In my last house a daylight basement the original sheetrock was glued to the cement walls with liquid nails that worked very well. I did pull it all out and add furring for electrical spaces. (I don't like exposed conduit and surface boxes in a room that became my man land). If you are worried about cracking at the sill add a accent trim over the gap.


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One possible solution (there are no doubt others, and I'll be interested to see what they are) is to set a strip (4 to 12" wide) of 1/2" cement-based tile-backer board at the bottom edge of the drywall.



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