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The proper installation of intumescent paint to create a fire barrier is not a do it yourself project. though in theory an intumescent paint might work, in practice, magic-in-a-can tends to be impractical in anything but a corner case in commercial contexts and adding additional layers of gypsum board is inevitably the preferred solution based on cost, ...


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I had a similar situation where the backer board extended a few inches past my planned tiling edge in my shower. After I had finished with the tile, I taped the joint and applied joint compound over the backer board and it seems great. It's been three years and there is no cracking or any problem with it. That's not exactly an answer but I hope it helps you ...


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If this is a code requirement that the city is demanding of you, see if they'll accept a layer of gypsum veneer plaster over the top of the 1/2" drywall. The National Gypsum association gives such an assembly a 1 hour fire rating if you use their special fire-resistive backer-board: http://www.nationalgypsum.com/File/goldd.pdf Normal drywall might be less ...


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5/8" drywall is only required nowadays if it's still actually garage and there's living space above it. But it sounds like it's not a garage anymore, and if there's no living space above it, then you doubly don't need 5/8" drywall. Regardless, you shouldn't have to pass a drywall inspection unless you're already altering the drywall there in which case. ...


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Either way is good, paper or tape. I finished my basement and garage and have done a lot of drywall in the past. I use paper in the corners mostly for sure, and mesh/fiberglass tape or paper tape over the flat spots and metal corners. I used normal joint mud (All Purpose) with the mesh tape and some joints have cracked, but only a few. Those had to be ...


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That is pretty much it except waterproofing. The easiest way to do this is do your plastic**/backerboard first, then drywall, mud/tape/sand/, hit it with waterproof membrane***, then tile last. ** - I don't put plastic behind hardiboard unless I am afraid of water coming in from the other direction. With plastic if backer gets wet you are looking at ...


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See if you can get some drywall scraps (you certainly don't want to buy a whole sheet for this) and fill in the corner, then fill the remaining gaps with drywall compound (both of which are fine with hot metal.) For a dire kludge if you can't manage to beg some scraps you could build up the whole thing from drywall tape and compound, but ANY place that's ...


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For exterior applications, fiberglass faced gypsum board is commonly used. Fiberglass, unlike paper, is resistant to mold growth and ordinarily does not deteriorate when exposed to moisture. For protected locations such as an exterior shed, this is almost certainly adequate as is indicated by the service life of the current installation. Fiberglass faced ...


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Nothing should ever be mounted just to the drywall. Whenever possible, everything should be mounted directly to the substructure (studs,blocking, etc.) When framing is not available hollow wall anchors should be used, but only in light duty applications. In the case of your vent I would suspect that two sides abut the rafters or joists. Locate them and try ...


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Cement board, tile backer board - or use the exterior siding flavor of "otherwise pretty much the same product"


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Using tin-snips and pliers, a small "L" shaped bracket could be fabricated from sheet metal with one leg fastened to the metal air box and the other leg receiving the screw holding the diffuser.


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I'd use a few pieces of wood up in the ceiling, to have something for screwing the vent to. The plaster is getting a little worn-out there. I wouldn't trust anchors or make anymore holes for them, nor use toggle bolts; that plaster is about to go and you're about to run out of room (hide-able hole). -I just really don't like wall hangers and I wouldn't want ...


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You just need an anchor. You can't do it right on the edge of the plaster so you might be able to reuse current holes or maybe drill new ones. Probably an expanding slip plastic anchor (cheapest of the anchor varieties) is the best for something lightweight in plaster.


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I'd recommend these lag shields but the info in this link can help you decide. You could probably go with simple lead sleeves but without knowing the condition of your brick or the exact weight of the load you'll be supporting lag shields are a safer bet. As far as going through the plasterboard goes, it's not any different than attaching something to ...


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You can use a mason's trowel. Or you can cut and modify a low cost 6 inch putty knife to fit the angle. When using either, drag the point out from the corner and keep the point of the tool in contact with either adjacent surface.


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I have done many patches in both drywall and plaster. As the previous answe r suggested, take the time to clean up the edges of the hole and open it up all the way to the floor if this has not been done. Attach a back up board to the inside of the wall by driving 2 inch long drywall screws through the plaster into the board. This should be about 3 to 4 ...


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Spend the time to clean the edge of the plaster so it is straight, this will save you time and make those top two inches that will be visible look nice. I personally would use a heaver drywall (5/8) to closer match the original and use thinner shims (they sell a cardboard like shim for drywall). Butt the new drywall up the cleaned up line and make sure to ...


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How can I avoid hitting wood when cutting through drywall? People typically use low-cost metal detectors and stud detectors to avoid drilling into or opening holes onto electrical wiring, metal structural members or wooden studs etc. It's not a stud. Some kind of panel If a previous owner has somehow attached drywall to what was a completely ...


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What room is this in? Is the room near the kitchen or the bathroom? Is that an exterior wall? I will see this in our bathroom when I forget to turn on the fan, or when I run the humidifier in a room with a cold exterior wall. It's likely just condensation from cooking, a humidifier, the shower, etc. The drops are darker because as they roll down the ...


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Since your ceiling is so uneven, I would recommend installing furring strips approximately 16" on center perpendicular to the ceiling joists across the entire ceiling. I would also install them around the perimeter of the room. This will even out the waves in the ceiling, and the ceiling will appear to be perfectly flat. If you need to, you can shim behind ...


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If you have space, you can sister a straight 2x4 along side the joists at the proper height and attach the drywall to the 2x4. That's a good option if you only have a few bad joists. Pay extra attention to the joints in the drywall to make sure everything ends in the middle of a joist. You may end up adding a few extra 2x4's in some places just for nailers. ...


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Went through this recently myself. I'd try to limit the joist-to-joist out-of-flatness to 1/8" or less. If it's an obvious part of the ceiling, try for 1/16". Get a long straightedge and a pile of drywall shims. High joists are pretty easy: add shims to bring them down to flat with the others. Low joists require you to build up the adjacent joists ...


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Those stones are just facing and can be knocked out with chisel/hammer combo. The shelf might need a sledge hammer or a lot of whacks with hammer.


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According to this reference: http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/community/forum/building-code-questions/27872/stud-spaces-air-ducts using stud space as a supply duct is not permitted.


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A vent isn't hard to extend. Any decent contractor could extend your current vent to closet wall. I am assuming this is the outside of the closet too - you don't ever put a vent in the inside of a closet and not even sure that is code. Anyway you need to part ways with this contractor if you can. If he even thinks about telling you something that dumb ...


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You are correct: this is a bad idea. Hire an AC contractor to re-do the vent, then your contractor can build a wall around it.


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Knock out the drywall around it until you can grab it with locking pliers. Either unscrew it or break it off (if it broke going in it may not want to come out any more cooperatively.) Spackle the hole and move whatever it is that caused you to drill it up or down a little bit so the new hole does not line up with the old one if the screw is broken off in ...


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EDIT*** It is a steel stud. This is actually very bad news. Steel drywall studs are sheet metal, not structural iron. They are designed to hold up drywall, using the very sharp-tipped drywall screws, and not much else. They typically don't have enough strength to take a large drill bit without buckling, and you will get the standard thin-metal messy ...



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