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22

Cut some short strips of plywood or even paneling (long enough to overlap both sides of the hole by a couple of inches). Don't cut your fingers off. Put the plywood strip(s) in the hole and position the strip so it is extending out beyond both edges of the hole, behind the sheetrock. Hold the strip tightly by pulling outward on the back of strip with your ...


11

Why not use standard 1/2" drywall after you shim out the studs. Use 1/4" stock or rip 1 1/2" strips of 1/4" plywood. Tack these to each stud. Then screw the 1/2" drywall through the shims and into the studs. I would probably use 1 5/8" drywall screws for a better grip. By the way, if this is in or near a furnace room, be sure to use fire rated drywall.


5

You will NOT want to support your 78 1/2 inch rod from the drywall alone. Drywall fastened up to the ceiling is a pretty good challenge just holding up it's own weight then yet you trying to add 70 pounds to that. So what you want to do is to locate the support members (usually called ceiling joists) to which the drywall is attached. You would then want to ...


4

NO this plan has no merit, spraying the borax water solution in a hole would only get some, if any of the mold and you would be guesting anyway. If your house was on fire would you drill holes in the walls and spray water at the holes and hope? The only way to check for mold is to open up the wall and testing spots that look suspicious.(If you really think ...


3

This is not a DIY job. Mold can spread everywhere in a wood-framed house full of drywall. Call in the pros to estimate the source and extent of the infection. Simply killing the mold won't help if you don't find the moisture source that made it moldy in the first place. PSA to the world: stop building houses out of wood and drywall. Sheesh, what awful ...


3

The problem, although difficult, can be solved. If the silicone has squeezed out from the drywall joint it needs to be cut. With a utility knife slice away all dried silicone that is above the surface of the drywall. The lower the better. Don't be overly concerned about damaging the drywall panels; don't butcher them, but don't preform surgery either. After ...


3

Remove an outlet or switch plate and look at what the edges of the wall are. It should be immediately obvious if they're wood paneling or something. Otherwise, it'll be plaster or drywall. Drywall will have straight edges and a chalky core, while plaster is more organic-looking and flowing, and will have wooden supports behind it. Regardless, it's actually ...


3

I guess it's too late to consider 5-1/4" trim? Hit the line of old caulk with a long blade utility knife (like an Olfa), a sharp chisel or a wallpaper scraper. Then sand lightly to knock down any other lumps and apply a coat or two of mud. (Premixed if you have time; 20 or 90 minute setting compound if you're in a hurry.) When dry, sand lightly.


2

My expertise is in framing and it is good practice when framing to always put "nailers" in (something to nail the sheetrock or sheathing to). This is usually done by putting a piece on the flat (the larger dimension facing what is going to be nailed to it). I would not recommend using the sheetrock in the wall to support the sheetrock on the ceiling as ...


2

If the hole is fairly small (say <4" diameter), then you can likely get away with just covering the hole with fiber mesh tape and using a hard setting compound (e.g. Sheetrock 90) to fill the hole. For larger holes Craig has the "best" method, but I've used this method successfully for holes in plaster and drywall up to 3.5" diameter.


2

Drywall patches are available at most home improvement stores. I've personally never used one, so I can't say how well they work (if at all). Though for the couple of dollars they cost, it might be worth a try. There are self adhesive patches like this one available at most home improvement stores. Wal-Board Tools 4" x 4" Drywall Repair Patch Again, ...


2

You can use nonmetallic sheathed cable in basements, as long as you follow a few rules. If you're using 12 AWG cable, and you're installing the cable at angles to the joists. You'll have to pull the cable through bored holes, or along running boards. You cannot staple the cable along the bottom of the joist. When you come down the wall, you'll have to ...


1

Sounds like a true DIY project.1/8 inch thick flat steel stock should be adequate. Am I seeing this e: one length of steel above the other (spaced accordingly), attached to the wall framing with HD screws through holes in each piece of steel? As long as the wall framing is sound and secured properly, I'm confident it will easily support the 60" and it's ...


1

If I am reading your post correctly you want to raise the ceiling by 600ml's which, if Google is right, that comes out to 23.622In. I don't see that happening without a total rework of the ceiling. You have a better chance of lowering the bed at the bottom, but you are going to lose that space. Take pictures or give us a drawing with dimensions of the room ...


1

Ready for muddy water? If you go by solely by code, 2012 IRC Table R302.1(1) specs out a 1 hour TESTED wall assembly with fire from both sides. As an individual component, IBC Specs out a 40 min rating per layer of 5/8" Type X so to have a 1 hour untested assembly you would need two layers EACH SIDE. The only way to get the 1 hour rating is to use a ...


1

To fix the damage, pry any loose material free, patch with compound, sand, and prime/paint with a paint designed for wet areas (preferably mold/mildew-resistant too). To prevent this from happening again, you'll need to improve ventilation in the area. It's a little hard to tell from these photos, but this looks like a corner within your shower where warm ...


1

You may want the type X 5/8" drywall with the furnace there (may not be required but it won't hurt). When you use a large mudding knife, the 1/16" over a 8-12" span will be difficult to impossible to detect. If you can pull the ceiling moulding without damaging it, I'd do that first. Replace the drywall behind the moulding, mud and tape the entire patch ...



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