Hot answers tagged

25

You want to add backing to the inside sides of the existing studs as well as to the centre of the span. The simplest way to do this is to cut the new backing (preferably 2x4, or whatever the existing stud dimensions are) about 4" longer than the height of the opening and screw them to the existing studs. The cut one more piece of backing to the same length ...


7

I'm a Drywaller of 25 years, the saw blade suggestions are DANGEROUS there are possible screws going up the center of that stud ... do not use a saw blade, the guy who suggested the utility knife had it right, make sure you have a screw gun handy incase you come across a screw.


6

Aside from electrical and plumbing interference, you can do pretty much whatever you want with the framing. That wall is mostly decorative (it saved some money by not requiring the cabinet makers to finish the backs of the cabinets). If you have smooth walls, open the drywall enough to work. Frame in your opening, replace the drywall, add corner bead or ...


6

Use a utility knife to score through the drywall. It will take several passes to get all the way through. Go slow, be careful, and don't over cut at the ends. Only go 3/4" onto the stud, going an inch or more could cause you to expose the whole stud and weaken the drywall on the opposite side. I do agree that doing this is not enough for that wide of a ...


5

There's really only one right way to do this. It takes a bit of time, but it's not difficult or complicated. You'll want to replace the tape to ensure that the seam doesn't propagate through the paint. Pick up some premixed topping compound (available in gallon or smaller buckets), and a short roll of joint tape (cheap enough to not bother experimenting ...


3

Assuming the hole is the width of a typical stud bay, just attaching the patch on the edges is not a sufficiently strong solution. Screws (or nails) near edges weaken the structural integrity of drywall and the patch is likely to shift and crack eventually. I would attach short pieces to each stud for mounting the sides and 1x3s top and bottom to span the ...


3

I much prefer to use the mesh tape that has a sticky back on it. Cut your tape to size, press it in place, and then spread your compound over it. The paper tape is messier, harder to work with, and can slip around. Also, my experience with spackling vs premixed drywall compound is that the spackling is dryer. It makes filling larger holes easier. It doesn't ...


3

Any common construction or project adhesive. That said, drywall nails are fairly thin for just that reason. If it's large enough that you're installing a patch, a nail won't destroy the patch. And that said, it's often the easiest solution to simply enlarge the patch to something suitable for repair, say 6" x 6". Float some one-by lumber or plywood scraps ...


3

My wife and I had our kitchen renovated just this past month and we told the contractor we would do all the painting of walls and trim as my wife is very meticulous, has a good steady hand, and an exceptional eye for detail. We choose one of the best One Coat Cover paints on the market and figured we wouldn't have to prime/seal the drywall first. We were so ...


2

Sounds like you need a good exhaust fan to keep the moisture down. Good luck!


2

Movement is the enemy of masonry of any type. In this case, it depends on a few factors. How much movement? How often does the movement occur? What products were used to install the tile? What size and type of tile? If all you're asking is whether some cracking is likely to occur, the answer is yes. However, it may be negligible from an aesthetic ...


2

WHile the selected answer is the cleanest way, if you wish to cut back to the existing studs, use the RightToolForTheJob (TM). That is, get yourself a multi-tool oscillator, like this one Genesis . There are better, more expensive ones, but either way this tool will do a hundred different jobs. For your purpose, put the saw blade on and it'll be easy ...


2

I have an abused cordless circular-saw for situations like this, where adding furring isn't an option. The accepted answer tells you how to patch a hole in some drywall where adding furring is an option. It fails to entail how to cut drywall half-off a stud (upvoted however, because as pictured, that's what you do). Draw a line. Set the appropriate depth. ...


2

In my last house a daylight basement the original sheetrock was glued to the cement walls with liquid nails that worked very well. I did pull it all out and add furring for electrical spaces. (I don't like exposed conduit and surface boxes in a room that became my man land). If you are worried about cracking at the sill add a accent trim over the gap.


1

One possible solution (there are no doubt others, and I'll be interested to see what they are) is to set a strip (4 to 12" wide) of 1/2" cement-based tile-backer board at the bottom edge of the drywall.


1

No, you cannot support your blinds with two pieces of paper, because that's all there is in drywall to resist the tension force pulling out or at an angle. The contained gypsum is strong to compression, you can stand on it if it's flat on the floor. But if you screw in and then exert force to pull the screw out, with very little force you'll either have the ...


1

They make 1/16" Drywall shims, you can find them at home depot, Drywall suppliers have 1/8" drywall shims. They are made of cardboard, and do the job nicely.


1

Get yourself a small bucket of pre-mixed tape compound in the Sheetrock section of Home Depot/Lowes, and 2 sizes of putty knives if you don't already own some. You would then put a thin coat or two overlapping the missing piece. Let it dry and sand lightly. It may take a few coats and sanding sessions to get near perfect.


1

you dont need to prime finished walls with paint on them if they are in good shape, but you should - it will save you finding out they arent. as to priming fresh drywall, your answer is yes. but whats really interesting is seeing some of the answers that say no. i cant figure out their logic. i have been in the general contracting business for 20 ...


1

Run the screw in reverse until it drills a hole for you in the drywall. Then sink it carefully. Down to the size of about 1.5" strips you can still use screws with this method. For anything smaller I'm partial to construction adhesives that act like liquid nails.



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