Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

11

The reason why this is happening is the structural members are expanding and contracting with the temperature/humidity changes. There is no good solution to fix the issues, but you can cover it up. The quick and dirty solution would be to put up quarter round over the seams, and attach it to the studs only- That is not to the ceiling. This would allow for ...


4

From the picture it seems that the walls were done and the ceiling last and trying to meet the walls. Normally (if done right) the drywall on the ceiling would rest on the drywall from your walls. In this case even if you had a lot of contraction throughout the year you would have a very minor crack at most (which could be fixed with plaster or even ...


3

It depends on the type of anchor and the length of the screw, but I think you may have another problem. Most drywall anchors rely on the screw to expand the anchor and secure it into the drywall. In these cases, if the screw is not into the anchor to an adequate depth, the anchor will not have sufficient purchase in the sheetrock. With this said, however, ...


2

You're approaching this backwards. If there is any mitigation that you would need to do, the inspector would have to approve it. You should therefore ask your inspector this question; he/she will be happy to tell you.


2

Don't put plaster on OSB. Put plaster on plasterboard aka blueboard. OSB is very moisture sensitive. Your plan will eventually result in rotten, swelled OSB with plaster falling off of it, especially if the building won't be heated.


2

To a certain extent, moisture is unavoidable during construction. However, this is why you don't build in winter, especially in your climate, because the surface temperatures of many smooth materials (your windows, tile, plaster) are going to fall below the dew point, especially if the heating system hasn't been installed yet. When that happens, any moist ...


1

Wall studs should be every 16". If you measure from the start of the wall where the pipes are, you should be able to hit a stud every 16" behind the backing board. I'm not sure what the pipes are that you have in your kitchen - venting maybe, but I would look for shelves that would be supported via studs through the backing board wall instead of trying to ...


1

A lot of moisture comes out of drywall mud after it is applied. I strongly recommend that you rent commercial dehumidifiers to dry the air out as soon as possible. (This is exactly what I did when I built a house and the drywall was installed/mudded in winter - even driving out to the house in the middle of a snowstorm to empty the reservoirs.)


1

I've done this on one room- taking a knock-down texture and skim coating it to make it smooth. The downside is that you then are able to see every wave, bump, and bobble that the drywall installers didn't bother fixing because they knew it would be hidden by texture. ;) I was able to get by with one coat and one sanding, but I was also applying a ...


1

The fly is a crane fly and has nothing to do with eating your drywall. http://www.cirrusimage.com/flies_crane.htm


1

Mistake #1. Never use mesh tape with pre mixed joint compound. Mesh tape is for setting type (powder mix) compound. Also never use paper tape with setting type compound. Mistake #2. Bubble problem. Always make sure that you have a BLEED OUT when you set the paper tape. Bleed out = when you're pushing the tape into the compound make sure you see excess ...


1

Typically, when butting corner-bead you should, first, cut about a 2" to 3" piece of bead and place it under the butt joint. That way your two pieces will butt together neatly and will be smooth when you mud over them. If your run is longer than 10', you'll need to do this (most bead is 8', but 10' is also available).



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible