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12

There is a ton of information and history out there. Studs are strong pieces that are the internal structure of your walls. They are covered by some type of material (the "skin") that is what you see when you look at a wall. If you imagine your wall without any type of skin material, there are probably two studs at the left and right edges and definitely ...


7

Every seam is a potential crack. Old drywall is more likely to have been hung with nails rather than screws, more opportunity to shift and pop nails. Taping is the hardest part of drywall work and bigger sheets means less taping (and less sanding and mess). Adding and removing paneling may have loosened the drywall underneath, exacerbating all of the ...


6

In countries with high labor costs, people build structures out of wood, not concrete or bricks or earth, as wood is faster to build with, thus minimizing those high labor costs. In such buildings, the wood is the structural core that frames the walls, floors, ceilings, and roof, and there are various terms for the different pieces of wood depending on where ...


4

It's hard to say whether your drywall will support this, it might, it might not. Big factors are the thickness, condition, and stud spacing. As well, if the bars ever experience a dynamic load like someone bumping into it, pulling on mugs, etc. it might very well fail while it was fine with a static load. The "right" way to do this is to open up the walls ...


4

This website is predominantly used by US residents, so, for those of us who live or originate elsewhere there are potentially confusing differences in terms and practises. It seems a lot of US construction uses timber (i.e. wood) as the primary load-bearing structures. In Europe masonry predominates. A stud wall is traditionally made with a timber frame ...


4

You have to mud anyway; if you tape and mud, all you need is tape and mud. If you replace, you need to tear out, buy drywall, put in and tape and mud. Unless you have some other unstated reason to rip the wall open, tape, mud and be done with it - similar amount of work, less mess/trash, no noticeable difference in the wall when done.


3

paper tape: stronger, less likely to crack easier for inside corners because you can crease/fold it easy to cover with first mud coat, lays nice and flat must be bedded in initial layer of mud mesh tape: have seen cracks over time drywall knife seems to catch on it easily, pulls it easy to lay down without bedding in mud Just my opinions formed over ...


3

This is the order that works well for me. Subfloor Framing & Drywall Underlayment Door Casings Finished Floor (undercut the casings to the finished floor height) Baseboards (If you are carpeting put baseboards down before carpet.)


3

Pro installers will install drywall over irregular framing, which can give the impression of thicker sheets. Drywall can be skimcoated with setting joint compound. This can be as thick as 1/4 inch, in some cases. Originally, the skim was done with plaster In any case, you should fill with a setting compound mixed a bit stiffly and taper out 12 inches ...


2

They are wrong. Drywall is gypsum and paper. In the presence of standing water, paper will grow mold and gypsum will turn to mush. It is water-soluble. That means it will dissolve. Give it a kick with your shoe on. It will probably feel soft and mushy. Replace everything with materials that are not affected by water: cinderblocks, cementboard, lime plaster, ...


2

Hopefully there was a notch drilled in the plate, so that when a wire staple is set it will pull the wire in behind the face of the drywall. It should have been cut out large enough to allow a metal plate to cover the wire to protect it, although it is unlikely there will be any nails or screws going into the corner right there, but you never know.... ...


2

100 pounds is not an impossible load. Heavy mirrors routinely weigh that much and are often mounted in drywall using two anchor points. No question, mounting on studs is much stronger and more reliable. Also, as pointed out by @Steven, dynamic loads are much more challenging than static loads. Repeated strong tugs could weaken an otherwise fine mounting. ...


2

When I did my shower, I lined it up so the Hardi/drywall seam was about 1" before the edge of my shower tiles. Then I just covered this seam with mesh tape and thinset. So when I laid tile, it overlaid onto the drywall by about 1". I then used a caulk matched to the grout color run along the outside edge of the tile where it met drywall. The tile edge is a ...


2

In the sound studios where I work, we've had several rooms added using RC for acoustic dampening. The drywall is hung in the same orientation as the wall studs, but the pattern for screws holding the drywall is done differently to attach to the RC channel. I'll include an image showing the method I am most familiar with:


2

Point 1 Usually paneling is put up over cracked plaster as a expedient fix. Lookup skimcoating plaster as a fix for bad plaster. It works well on walls. Anchoring is needed for ceilings if the plaster is broken off the lath. Point 2 Overlaying drywall is a definite fix. 3/8 thick panels is frequently used for this. Some problems can be: the need for ...


1

It may be better to mount from ceiling joists if at all possible, or else use a free-standing solution as suggested by Keshlam's comment. RC mounting on walls is meant to be flexible enough to absorb vibration, so mounting to those walls would either nullify the purpose of having RC mounted walls, or damage the drywall by exceeding it's structural capacity.


1

You have a leak - that's what causes moist drywall in virtually all cases. The rust is presumably coming from drywall nails/screws or other nails or steel/iron in the wall. Without fixing the leak first, no repair will last. Once you get the leak fixed you can coat the wall with a "stain-blocking primer" (often shellac based) to stop the rust stains from ...


1

Option 3 is the sanest IMHO. You can get a bucket of drywall mud for $15 and do a "skim coat" over the panels to create a flat surface. No need to sand first; this stuff will stick to anything! Once the mud is dry, you can sand it to get a smooth look, or texture it. Texturing can be done with cans of spray-on texture you get at big box stores, or using a ...


1

USG claims paper is stronger. (hmm- specifically with "drying type" joint compound). With ready-mixed (drying-type) compounds, paper tape must be used to ensure good joint performance. With setting compounds, either paper tape or fiberglass mesh joint tape can be used; however, paper joint tape performs best. Of course, if you can't get paper to work ...


1

Look behind an electric plate of some kind (light switch or power plug) carefully, to see how the walls are constructed. An original (not added later) junction box will be fastened securly to a stud, so a stud will be on one side or the other of the box. If there is a little clearence around the drywall hole you can see a sliver of the stud itself. Use that ...


1

Summing up what others have said and providing a bit of context: Studs are vertical structural components in the walls. In load-bearing walls, they carry part of the weight of the house and its contents above them. In American construction this generally means a "2x4" stud placed every 16 inches on center along the length of the wall, with additional ...


1

I've done my research on a similar project. In my case, I was wanting to make a wall that looked like a wall, but would accommodate my hobby of collecting "Magnetic Poetry" and refrigerator magnets. My solution was not cheap, but exactly what I was looking for. If you decide to revisit this at some point, try doing a search for "vinyl coated steel" sheets in ...


1

Just buy a little tub of joint compound, or spackling and cover up the areas. You will have to paint it as well. If it is a hole then get a small piece of drywall slightly bigger than the hole but where you can still get it inside (you may have to cut it bigger). Drill a hole in the middle to fit a piece of string in it. This will help you to hold it to ...


1

It doesn't make sense to do the inside before the roof has been replaced. The drywall will most likely end up getting damaged when the roof is being demoed and new sheathing is installed. The contractors may inadvertently step on the backside of the drywall and cave it in. There is also a big chance of some water damage. Keeping the original lathe for the ...


1

It really depends on a lot of factors...namely your climate and how much space you have in the ceiling rafters. Ideally, you'd insulate with spray foam. That will give you the best r-value and act as a vapor barrier. You should be able to do it separate from the new roof but it may be a lot easier to just do it all at once. (It's a lot easier to toss lathe ...


1

I don't claim to know California building code. That said: I don't think the building code cares what you do with your aquarium piping, so long as it doesn't connect to your residential plumbing. Do what you want with that top-off tube. As for electrical, if you want to run wire then it's a bigger deal and there are lots of rules you'll need to follow. Too ...


1

TL/DR version: It doesn't matter how many of those rails you put into any one sheet of drywall (assuming they are not crazy close together). Those loads won't interact with each other. The problem with drywall is preventing the fastener from pulling out - if your fastener doesn't pull out, then you're going to be fine. Longer: You can ignore the vertical ...


1

Make an additional support! Just take a long plank (or whatever You may think of as an aestethically-looking construction item) and attach it to the studs (if You are sure where they are), then - attach Your hangers to the plank/support. Given this You may want to choose whatever You like to look good and it will function well. If You will use correct ...


1

I'd use mesh tape, overlapped if necessary. Let your first coat set for a while since it'll be thick inside the hole. If it bulges out while drying, just push it back to flat after a couple of hours.



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