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4

Last time I encountered that, I put two 2x4's across the stud span, chamfered the edges too a 45 angle and painted it to match the wall. Mounted the bracket onto that, if it's a rental or you just don't want to wreck the walls, put a thin piece of cardboard between the 2x4 and wall before you mount it to make sure it doesn't pull up any paint when you remove ...


4

I would trace the outline of that oval-shaped piece of your light fixture onto a piece of wood about as thick as or very slightly thicker than your mirror. Cut it out and then cut off a flat from the bottom so that it fits above your mirror over the junction box in the wall. Drill mounting holes through it so that the fixture's mounting screws pass through. ...


3

The drywall mud is just as likely to stick to the aluminum flashing as it is to the board. Just observe how well dried mud sticks to your drywall mud taping knives. It may be possible to put a light coat of mineral oil or silicon lubricant spray on the metal beforehand to minimize the mud adhesion. But you would definitely want to experiment with some small ...


3

I would definitely assume the wall is supporting that beam. Get a structural engineer's advice to be sure, and to find out what your options might be. Solutions often exist, but may not be DIYable... and this is emphatically not something you want to risk getting wrong. For comparison: My contractor was able to open a 15-foot-wide passageway through a ...


2

Since your goal is not to use any trim, we can't cover it up. You need something that will look like drywall after you paint it. If you use joint compound / putties it will crack at the seams if the steps budge/give. What about paintable caulk? It'll maintain its elasticity so it won't crack, it'll seal the edge, and it'll look like drywall after its ...


2

You use masking tape to adhere some lightweight poly/plastic sheeting onto the wall directly below your work area, which will catch dust and/or channel it directly into a collector bin. This will reduce dust on the floor/carpet. Some people like to use an oscillating cutting tool to cut holes in drywall for outlets rather than a traditional drywall saw. In ...


2

Use a vacuum to suck up the dust as you make it. This will likely require an additional set of hands depending on what you're doing. As cumbersome as it may be, a vacuum will collect not only the large dust particles that fall down, but also the fine dust that's thrown into the air. If you're using a hole saw to cut the ceiling, a dust bowl (or similar ...


2

Here's one small tip: use a sticky note to catch dust from drilling- (courtesy of: http://rebrn.com/re/lpt-use-a-post-it-note-to-catch-dust-when-drilling-2615252/) Another tip (for cutting into the ceiling) might be to use a piece of paper or a styrofoam cup to create a cone- taped around a drill or sawzall- (How to avoid dust when drilling in the ...


2

This one is a huge bummer. You don't have many options here. Either cut out the box and replace it higher up, or re-mount it higher on the stud, or lower the mirror. Whether you can re-use the box depends on what kind of box it is and how it is mounted. I think moving the box is by far the easier option.


2

As Dan G pointed out, being off-ctr by 0.64 cm on each stud really doesn't matter. Personally :-) , if I had to deal w/ a similar situation but a worse mismatch, e.g. 14-inch vs 17-inch spacing, I'd do one of 2 things. 1) bolt short lengths of 2x4 vertically to the existing studs, then hang the bracket on these add-ons. 2) (more work and less stable) get ...


2

As Joe points out, if this wall is original, then it's not drywall, but plaster. You can't easily detect studs behind plaster walls with a stud detector. You likely have to use test holes. One option is to drill a largish hole in the center(ish) of where you will mount the TV. Then use a coat hanger to fish it into the hole to see if you can locate the studs ...


2

An over-100-year-old apartment building is likely plaster-over-lath. In that case, you should be able to drill through the plaster and into the lath to sink wood screws. If this is so, you'll see what looks like sawdust on the tip of the drill when you pull it out. I'd probably use a bunch more than just the 4 recommended, but it'll hold a TV under 50 lbs....


1

Assuming the bricks would be adequately supported from below, you would use brick ties (attached to wall studs on one end, and embedded in mortar on the other) to give your brick wall vertical stability. If you want the look of brick wall with less effort, you can just install brick-look tiles on a suitable backer board onto your existing wall.


1

Really, your situation is no different than thousands of others with drywall under the stair trim. The key difference is that you're trying for a good fit of the drywall against the woodwork. This doesn't mean you're more likely to have cracks if it's done properly. I would do three things to make this happen: Be sure the stringer on that face is well ...


1

Use a stud finder (or other method), to locate the framing around the window. Then use long enough screws to go through the brackets, and into the framing. If you use drywall anchors, the drywall may support the rail. However, if you hang a heavy curtain, or accidentally yank on the curtain. The anchors could pull out of the wall, leaving a mess behind.


1

Maybe you need plastic plugs (screws alone in drywall aren't enough), but traditional framing will have wood structure above and a couple inches to the outside of a window opening. If you can keep your brackets close to the edge, you should hit wood.


1

You can always drill into the concrete (behind the foam) and use a 4 or 5" concrete screw (Tapcon). Should be good for 300 lbs per 1/4" screw. Don't hit any wires or pipes burried in the foam



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