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If just the paper on the surface is broken you can fill the gouge and paint over it. If the sheetrock is broken and falling off it is better to cut a section out. I find the closest stud on either side and cut the sheetrock down the center of the studs, cut a new piece to fit and screw it in at the edges of the new piece and the original area cut off then ...


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None of the pictures in your question necessarily point at a foundation issue. You have cracks in your drywall. What could cause these? The first picture is a screw or nail that wasn't set in the drywall properly. This means nothing. The other pictures could be poor drywall techniques. You just bought the house so you never lived through a winter. ...


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It is more than likely that those are large nails into the framing lumber to the side of the heater housing. There would be a number of ways to remove those. Use a Dremel tool with a cutoff wheel to cut the head off the nail. Then you can use a nail set or punch to drive the remaining body of the nail further into the side stud to allow the housing to ...


3

It looks like one layer of paper has separated from the other. The paper surrounding the tearout has loose flaps of paper around it too. Remove all loose paper and give a tight skim coat or two of paste spackle, sand smooth, prime and paint. You will be wise to get a 4" drywall knife to help in this. The little 1" knife that is considered a putty knife ...


2

While the mud is still wet, any knife stroke will slide the tape if not enough squeezing force is applied. What this squeezing does is press the excess mud from behind the tape; the less wet mud, the more friction between the tape and the drywall facing, and the less sliding/wrinkling is possible. I have never used a corner trowel for taping, and I think ...


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Shelves like the one described can carry a significant load and things are regularly being put on and off, increasing the dynamic load. Unfortunately, from the illustration (and the appearance of the listed item on the sellers website), there are only two screw holes at each end. This puts a serious load on each attachment point. Plasterboard or even ...


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I think the question you're asking is whether the joint compound will crack around the plugs if you don't tape the joint. Probably. But that depends on: How well you replace the plugs. If you don't center them perfectly, leaving uniform gaps, the joint compound has nowhere to go in the tight spots and you're left with a paper-thin skin on the surface ...


2

If you are sanding the paper tape, you definitely need more mud. So put on more mud. Removing it would not really help, it would just make more of a mess you have to mud over. I suggest 3-4", 6-8" and 12" for a progression in drywall "knives" (a coat with the small one, knock off only the high points, a coat with the medium one, knock off only the high ...


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Yes. Google tells me that model is compatible with VESA mounting. For heavy screens, be sure to buy a mount that is rated sufficiently, and is attached to the structure of your wall. (So for drywall covered stud-framed walls, you'd want to be sure to attach to the structural wooden studs inside the wall, not just the gypsum wallboard.) You can use a stud ...


1

Since the wood is apt to move a little, I suggest you use "tear away bead", and maybe apply some painter's caulk after a season if you see any gaps. The alternative would be flat taping, but that depends on a pretty close fit between the drywall and the timber.


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You can drill holes into the concrete with bits made for concrete. Depending on how dense the concrete is you can sometimes do this with a regular drill. (This takes some patience, it's not like drilling into wood. Don't push too hard or you'll break the bit. Just have patience) If the concrete is too dense, a hammer drill may be necessary. And yes they have ...


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I'd say yes, you need tape. I like the fiberglass mesh tape. It also self-sticking. I put strips of it over the joints before putting on any mud.


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My thoughts the same about drywall @Comintern, to make up the 1.5 it would be easiest to attach 2x4's sideways. If this is now a inside room I would remove the old exterior siding, However the “cement shingles” look like the asbestos type commonly used you might want to have them tested prior to working with them for health reasons. I don’t think I would ...


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Looks like that wall can is attached with nails instead of screws. A pry bar will be your best bet to remove it. Hope that helps! Let us know if you have any more questions.


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The easy sand is a "light-weight" compound which is why it sands so easily. If you ever sanded this type of compound you'd see why it shouldn't be applied in thin layers. It sands off very easily. If it is applied as a skim coat it wouldn't last 1 or 2 passes with your sander. You will see this frequently on all types of wall patching products. If it has ...


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Mix a cup of sand in a gallon bucket of thin mix joint compound...about the consistency of thick pancake batter... trowel on with a large blade and "sand mix" will "skip" occasionally at sticking to wall... do entire wall and when 90% dry take a moist...not wet... sponge and rub wall to soften peaks and smooth wall to uniform thickness... wait 24 hrs and ...



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