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6

Drywall mud is so darn cheap, why would you do this? That said, I actually tried this myself one time because I was temporarily without a car to get to the store, and I was impatient. I managed to get it to a somewhat workable consistency, but no matter what I did, I couldn't get the lumps out of it. I think if I'd let it sit and re-hydrate over a longer ...


5

I would just buy a 1x4 or similar material that would go with your butcher block and use them as a ledger board on the three sides. Simply measure the height you want, attach ledger board to wall all the way around (3 easy cuts) and attach them to the studs. Then just slide on your butcher block. To attach to ledger you can use screws but a little ...


4

I'd use joint compound, and smooth it in with a putty knife as smoothly as possible. Then, when it's dry, use a damp sponge to smooth it over to a paintably smooth surface.


3

Depending on the thickness of the existing plaster, a drywall patch with suitable support behind it (with "mud" or patching compound over it to merge the edges with existing plaster and achieve a smooth surface) may be a perfectly reasonable solution. Getting it really smooth and level so the patch doesn't "telegraph" through the wallpaper will take some ...


3

Ask yourself this: "If I install a vapor barrier, where is the water that it stops going to collect?" If you put a polyethylene vapor barrier behind a drywall-covered stud framed wall, then the answer is that water that condenses on the poly will fall onto the wood sill plate, growing mold and eventually rotting it out. Dedicated vapor barriers have no ...


3

While you can rehydrate mud, the rehydrated stuff you make will not perform acceptably. The reason is in the binder, the stuff that makes it harden and stick to the wall. This is usually polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). For reference, see the USG Sheetrock all-purpose joint compound MSDS, which lists "vinyl alcohol polymer" as an ingredient. PVA is water soluble, ...


2

Consider using a paintable latex caulk. Apply a very small amount then work it into the length of the crack with a finger. Wipe off all excess with a damp rag or sponge, then paint. It is a good method requiring no sanding. If your ceiling is painted with flat (no gloss) paint, as most are, you will not be able to see it when you are done.


2

Unfortunately you cannot re-wet drywall compound and get a usable product. It will break down in to a rough slurry, but the consistency will never be smooth enough to get a descent finish. I have to admit, however, that's where my knowledge ended, so I had to ask myself... why? Why doesn't it just turn back into the mud from whence it came. So to satisfy ...


2

As DMoore notes, a simple ledger would work well. If you want something that isn't visible, buy yourself a Kreg pocket screw jig like this one. Cut a few 2x4 to hold it up at the right spot, and then you can just screw it right in. I would try to use 2 screws per 2x4 to increase the strength.


1

I'm not sure what the fire barrier is specifically but in general you should be able to mount a floating top in this situation without any problems. You can do angle brackets, z clips, or ledgers(by far the easiest). The hardest part is going to be scribe-ing in all three sides to your walls. One trick is to do the ledger, paint it to match your walls, then ...


1

The commonly recommended solution is to find the wood the ceiling was screwed into (using a studfinder, or a magnet to find those screws), and screw the hanging hardware into that. That avoids questions of whether the plasterboard can take the weight, whether there's space behind the board to maneuver your proposed anchor, etc. A small hole is not hard to ...


1

You might have answered your own question... what about a (larger) needle? Tie the fishing wire round the middle of the needle (and perhaps use a dab of glue to hold it in place if it won't hold itself). If you can't find a large enough needle, try a small gauge knitting needle? Again it might need a dab of glue to hold the wire in place in the centre.


1

It's hard to tell from the picture but it looks like it was tile mounted to a wood board. Wood is one of the worst materials for behind the sink. If going to replace with tile, use a concrete backer board instead and consider using tile trim caps to cover the top. Otherwise use a solid stone or stone like material. And make sure the caulking is in good ...


1

Take a paint stir stick from a home improvement center, break it into pieces that will fit behind the patch hole, and pop in a screw to hold it in place, on the side away from the tile. It doesn't have to be rock solid, it's purpose is to keep the drywall patch in place long enough for the compound to dry. Once the patch is in place (liberally buttered with ...


1

How big an area? If it is small, can you replace the studs with pine? Cut the old out with a Sawzall. You could also use drywall adhesive.


1

If you're not snapping the heads off (torque), your drill just doesn't cut it. If you're stripping the heads, you're not pushing hard enough (under powered drills require more pressure to avoid this and also lose torque towards the end, helping you snap the heads off). If the drywall pops, use two or more screws 2-3" apart, slowly sinking each one to ...


1

I suspect the studs are really hard old-growth wood Lubricating screws can really help when driving them into wood. I've seen various lubricants suggested. For exterior projects I've used LM grease and petroleum jelly (vaseline) but I'm not sure if there are any problems using either in your situation. The other common solution is to drill pilot holes ...



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