New answers tagged

0

If I understand the issue correctly, you could insert a shim (the 'paper' end of a matchbook match works for me) into the hole, then screw in the screw. This will work similar to filling the hole with glue or using a larger diameter screw but in a less destructive measure.


0

A small tub of filler from a local DIY chain could do the trick - put the filler in the hole and then push the plug back in.


0

Glue by itself is rarely the right answer when a screw isn't holding. It sounds like you've stripped out the threads in the anchor. As others have said, switching to a thicker screw would solve that, by cutting new threads. A longer screw MIGHT reach an undamaged part of the anchor but is a less reliable solution. (The other classic solution is to ...


3

It sounds like a longer screw of the same diameter would solve your problem. If that doesn't work try a slightly larger diameter screw. You can help stop this problem from happening again by adding a spacer between the hook and the wall. The spacer can be of any material. It should look like a thick washer. The thickness should be whatever is now the ...


1

Might not be the answer you're looking for, but (as was the answer to that other question) you could pull it out and get a new plug. You might not need to redrill if you're careful or get a plug that'll hook into whatever hole is left. Also, I know it could just be preference, but have you tried Gorilla Glue?


0

The problem of the anchor not holding could be caused by poor hole drilling technique. If the drill turns too slowly, like by being in low gear, or is pushed into the wall too fast, and/or uses the wrong type of drill bit—such as a speed bit. These speed bits are not suitable for drilling drywall: Worse, some people hammer in a nail to create the ...


0

I solved the problem by blowing out the dust from inside of the hole before slipping in the anchor. Reginald


0

I am happy to report back that after 1 hour (part of it is because I am a newbie), I was able to remove these 8 nails. Tools used: flat head screwdriver, hammer and a 9-inch pry bar. The wall cans are only 14 inches wide. Hammer and screwdriver to create the gap and pry bar goes in to finish the job (only figured that out after I was done with 3 nails).


1

Looks like that wall can is attached with nails instead of screws. A pry bar will be your best bet to remove it. Hope that helps! Let us know if you have any more questions.


3

It is more than likely that those are large nails into the framing lumber to the side of the heater housing. There would be a number of ways to remove those. Use a Dremel tool with a cutoff wheel to cut the head off the nail. Then you can use a nail set or punch to drive the remaining body of the nail further into the side stud to allow the housing to ...



Top 50 recent answers are included