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17

Drywall Anchors I have had 100% success with drywall anchors but I am very careful about all aspects of the mounting hardware. You have to design and execute your plan carefully to have success, otherwise they'll be vulnerable to pulling out as Michael Karas points out. If you mess up any aspect of what I set out below, your anchors will probably pull ...


16

What you are using are the most basic drywall anchors available. They're inexpensive and included in many products because of that, but they aren't good for much, and wouldn't be up to the task of holding something a toddler will be climbing on (you know they will...) Look for products that spread out or lock into place when they enter the wall. The name ...


15

Most things that get regularly manipulated should not be hung with hollow-wall anchors. Eventually they pull out or the wallboard disintegrates. I'd install either some 1x4 wooden rails spanning between studs or a piece of finished plywood to which I'd mount the gate. Run construction or finish screws about 1" into the studs. Imagine the typical backer ...


6

EZ anchors are good but toggle bolts are better.


6

The simplest high-strength solution, if there isn't blocking behind the plaster to support it, is to mount the towel rack on an attractive piece of well-varnished wood (or a piece painted to match the room's trim) and mount that to two studs. Obviously this won't suit all tastes. Then again, no towel bar will suit all tastes.


6

You will find many many installations of towel bars that are simply the crappy drywall anchors on each end. These will work as long as the towel bar is treated with kid gloves. Anything more and eventually the towel bar will end up loose at the wall mounts. If there is not a framed in set of backing behind the towel bar location then your next best bet is ...


5

You will NOT want to support your 78 1/2 inch rod from the drywall alone. Drywall fastened up to the ceiling is a pretty good challenge just holding up it's own weight then yet you trying to add 70 pounds to that. So what you want to do is to locate the support members (usually called ceiling joists) to which the drywall is attached. You would then want to ...


4

Use toggles, but also put at least one good fastener into the stud. (Even if you have to drill a new hole/holes in the mount.)


3

It sounds like a longer screw of the same diameter would solve your problem. If that doesn't work try a slightly larger diameter screw. You can help stop this problem from happening again by adding a spacer between the hook and the wall. The spacer can be of any material. It should look like a thick washer. The thickness should be whatever is now the ...


3

It is more than likely that those are large nails into the framing lumber to the side of the heater housing. There would be a number of ways to remove those. Use a Dremel tool with a cutoff wheel to cut the head off the nail. Then you can use a nail set or punch to drive the remaining body of the nail further into the side stud to allow the housing to ...


3

Firstly you need a fixing the extends some distance each side of the hole, GripIt is one such fixing that is easy to use. You then needs lots of fixings that are spaced out, therefore I would be looking to fix a bit of 3”by1” to the wall the full height of the gate using say 4 spread out fixings, then screw the gate hinges to the wood. By having both ...


2

The are a couple of reasons why it might not go in, if it doesn't go in at all, then the hole is too small -try wiggling the drill on the way out to open it up. When you were drilling the pilot hole did you hit a stud? You should only encounter resistance when you are drilling for the first 1/2" and then nothing after that. If that's the case, then move ...


2

Position the rack so you can screw into the studs. If that is not practical then mount a sheet of decent thickness plywood onto the wall surface and fasten that to the studs wherever possible. The rack can then mount onto the plywood. If you use a plywood that is 3/4' inch (19 or 20mm) thick then the screws for the rack need not even penetrate the drywall at ...


2

I would bypass the drywall and long screws and flat mount 2x4 to the brick and then attach the TV mount to the studs with 1 1/2 wood screws. You would cutaway enough drywall to achieve a flat mount. You might have to add a 1x4 overtop to get the proper flush or slightly proud mounting.


2

It looks like a "Triple Grip" brand anchor. I have similar anchors. The box says 77 pounds in 5/8 inch drywall. No specification for 1/2 inch. [


2

I think this question warrants an answer with a healthy dose of caution: Shelves for supporting a lot of weight should not be supported via drywall! Structural shelves need to be supported by proper framing...namely the studs within the wall. Given that there is a party wall, if this is a condo, the walls may very well be made using steel studs. Depending ...


2

It's not unusual for the wall between tenants to be made with an extra layer of drywall. The Snaptoggle will work in those walls: It will easily handle the thickness you're dealing with, and it's easier to work with than regular old fashioned toggles.


2

In the case of either plaster or Thermalite panels, plastic plug-type anchors should suffice. I'd use those sized for a #12 or #14 screw of adequate length (per the anchor manufacturer's suggestion), and be sure to drill exactly the correct size. Be sure that you only leave the screw protruding only as far as necessary to allow the hooks to engage. ...


2

Your post contains a picture that shows exactly how this will perform in drywall, and normally it works very well. The first 3/8"-1/2" (closest to the screw head) of the anchor does not expand at all, so it won't damage the drywall. The next 1/2" of the anchor is designed to twist and "knot up" in a hollow cavity, and the tip is designed to slightly ...


2

I agree with ArchonOSX, you need to pull on the screw as you screw it in. But, be careful if isn't going deep enough. You could be hitting a wire or plumbing or the screw may just be too long for a framing piece. If that's the case you need to remove the first screw & start over with a shortened screw. Thread the wing on past where you want to cut or ...


2

To either screw it in or out you need to maintain tension on it to keep the toggle wing from spinning. Pull down on your plate with light pressure until the wing stops spinning. As it gets snug you can release the extra pressure. Good luck!


2

You may have to pull out the anchor, fill the hole, redrill it and install a new anchor if the first one has become too misfigured. Be careful not to overtighten. You could also get some other kind of anchors like these screw in kind that hold beter.


2

Might not be the answer you're looking for, but (as was the answer to that other question) you could pull it out and get a new plug. You might not need to redrill if you're careful or get a plug that'll hook into whatever hole is left. Also, I know it could just be preference, but have you tried Gorilla Glue?


2

I actually really like those linked triple grip wall anchors (linked by OP). The package often comes with its own drywall drill bit as well. The trick to using them is to pinch the "shoulders" in until they are flush with the sides of the anchor body before pushing them into the hole. Drywall is fairly chalky and brittle, so it will give a little bit where ...


1

Looks like that wall can is attached with nails instead of screws. A pry bar will be your best bet to remove it. Hope that helps! Let us know if you have any more questions.


1

Glue by itself is rarely the right answer when a screw isn't holding. It sounds like you've stripped out the threads in the anchor. As others have said, switching to a thicker screw would solve that, by cutting new threads. A longer screw MIGHT reach an undamaged part of the anchor but is a less reliable solution. (The other classic solution is to ...


1

Screw into studs, not drywall anchors, for something heavy that will be above your head while you sleep! If you're worried about shorting the circuit with your screw, turn the breaker off first. Measure voltage between hot, neutral and ground, and make sure its 0. Then measure resistance, and write down what you find. Then try to make sure with the stud ...


1

There are ceiling mounts available for most projectors that let you attach right to the ceiling, that might be easier. However, there is an adjustment that lets you use most projectors at an oblique angle to the wall, look for a "keystoning" adjustment in your projector's manual. This would allow you to get a perfect rectangular image with the projector ...


1

I would drill a slightly oversized hole through the drywall and wood, then drill full depth in the concrete for the sleeve anchors. Set the anchors flush with the surface of the concrete. I would then use over-length bolts into the anchors, at least 3". For extra stability, I might put a metal spacer in the oversized hole in the wood and drywall, and have ...


1

To hang lots of things, with the least amount of damage. You might want to consider picture rail molding. It's a molding run around the room, where pictures can be hung from using wire/string/rods/etc. It has the advantage that it can be securely fastened to the framing, and allows lots of things to hang with minimal damage to the wall.



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