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3

It depends on the type of anchor and the length of the screw, but I think you may have another problem. Most drywall anchors rely on the screw to expand the anchor and secure it into the drywall. In these cases, if the screw is not into the anchor to an adequate depth, the anchor will not have sufficient purchase in the sheetrock. With this said, however, ...


3

Do (or will) you have kids that will want to try to do a pull-up (or sit on) on a convenient shef? If not, then using the proper anchors should be fine. Many anchors will support far more than the weight you indicated (which is good, due to the leverage the shelf will place on the mounting points. I'd look at toggle bolts instead of screws or thin ...


2

The structure of the wall is gone in the direct vicinity, so moving the anchors you have will not work, and spackle is more a replacement for the paper on the drywall, than the gypsum itself. Most useful, I think: Plan A: How to wire a picture, using 2 hooks. The hooks do not have to be level https://www.flickr.com/photos/some_guy/16751622487/ Other ...


2

The are a couple of reasons why it might not go in, if it doesn't go in at all, then the hole is too small -try wiggling the drill on the way out to open it up. When you were drilling the pilot hole did you hit a stud? You should only encounter resistance when you are drilling for the first 1/2" and then nothing after that. If that's the case, then move ...


2

Position the rack so you can screw into the studs. If that is not practical then mount a sheet of decent thickness plywood onto the wall surface and fasten that to the studs wherever possible. The rack can then mount onto the plywood. If you use a plywood that is 3/4' inch (19 or 20mm) thick then the screws for the rack need not even penetrate the drywall at ...


2

I found this video on youtube titled: "Plastic Toggle Anchors" that shows their installation. The trick is to use your index finger to push in the toggle so that it can collapse down into a "barrel" shape for insertion into a pre-drilt hole in the dry-wall. Here are the key shots from that video. image #1 image #2 image #3 image #4


2

It's probably double 5/8ths drywall, I'd use toggle bolts. And then washers and 3" deck screws to the stud for safety (not drywall screws), even if you're going to do all four corners with toggle bolts. There should be some one-by inside the cabinet at the top (and possibly the bottom) this is where you want your fasteners penetrating, not just through the ...


2

I would bypass the drywall and long screws and flat mount 2x4 to the brick and then attach the TV mount to the studs with 1 1/2 wood screws. You would cutaway enough drywall to achieve a flat mount. You might have to add a 1x4 overtop to get the proper flush or slightly proud mounting.


1

There's metal corner bead under the finished surface. It will be more difficult to screw into than drywall alone. Put the screw more than an inch away from the corner and you should be fine. As a renter, just make sure you remove the curtain and patch and paint the holes you made when you need to leave.


1

For that much weight, I would try to drill into the studs. You can find them using a studfinder, or sometimes knocking and listening for the change in pitch will be enough. If in doubt, find several, and assume they are evenly spaced. Make sure the drilled holes and screws are long enough to penetrate well into the stud, say at least 2 inches. Of course, to ...


1

I used a flathead screwdriver that was a part of my computer repair kit from RadioShack. I was able to get the nail to come out enough and then grab it with pliers. Then once the nail is out, the anchor is really easy to pull out. I have a video available at http://youtu.be/T6BE45nCOiQ Hope it helps!


1

You only get one shot on anchor placement, unless your going to move them both to new holes at least an inch away. At this point I'd be looking at modifying the D-rings: string some picture wire between them or make small loops on both. Switching to toggle-bolts would give you an eighth inch of play, no problem. But you'd need a nut and a washer to stand it ...


1

I get a flat screw driver and tap them with a hammer until it is about 1/8" inside drywall. Then just a bit of spackle over the indention.


1

You may be trying to drill into a concrete or brick wall. you can remove some outlet covers (e.g., electric, cable) on that same wall to be able to get a peek inside and confirm. It's also possible that you are drilling into a stud or even a fire break. Both of the above situations are a good thing if you are trying to hang/mount heavy items. If it is a ...


1

The commonly recommended solution is to find the wood the ceiling was screwed into (using a studfinder, or a magnet to find those screws), and screw the hanging hardware into that. That avoids questions of whether the plasterboard can take the weight, whether there's space behind the board to maneuver your proposed anchor, etc. A small hole is not hard to ...


1

You might have answered your own question... what about a (larger) needle? Tie the fishing wire round the middle of the needle (and perhaps use a dab of glue to hold it in place if it won't hold itself). If you can't find a large enough needle, try a small gauge knitting needle? Again it might need a dab of glue to hold the wire in place in the centre.


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The manufacturers web site offers installation instructions, as well as a helpful video. An instructional video can also be found on YouTube.



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