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3

Typically you would remove them, however the anchor you are using is marketed as a "stud solver" meaning that it can be driven into a stud. I think it is fine to leave them. If you were using small plastic drywall anchors then I'd definitely remove them and drive a screw directly into the stud.


2

If the anchor has been overtightened and is now loose in the wall, it cannot be salvaged. The plaster in the wall (or the drywall) has been pulverized and will not hold this anchor or any other. You need to remove the anchor and the screw. AMENDED ANSWER Based on new information from the Original Poster, the anchor is a molly type that mushrooms behind ...


2

You're better off either cutting them flush or pulling the clips out with pliers and patching the holes. A few years ago I repainted my closets and pantry, and decided it was easier to just uninstall EVERYTHING and start over. I had these anchors, which were pretty much impossible to remove without destroying: The anchors you have are also single-use. If ...


1

If you could wind back the clock and use a heavy duty drywall anchor, this probably would have been fine: But now your options are more limited. You could try a larger than normal "Snaptoggle" brand anchor. Or make your own: Clean out the hole. Find the largest piece of wood that fits in the hole. Drill a hole in the wood, insert some string. Insert ...


1

I might suggest my, "If you don't overbuild it, it isn't worth doing," approach by: locating the studs and marking their centers (they should be 16" apart); cut out a stud-center to stud-center swath of drywall to include where your towel bar was mounted; replace drywall (using a "patch piece" from local HW store - usually 16"x16", so if you do a 4"x16" ...



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