Hot answers tagged

25

The Hole is too big: It could be that your pilot holes are too big. When the screw is inserted, the anchor does not expand enough to bite into the surrounding hole. Keep in mind that most plastic anchors are tapered, so you want them to fit tightly in the hole. If you can push them in too easily, then the hole is too big. Some plastic anchors have a ...


23

I wouldn't hang my TV from the drywall. You really should put it in a stud.


19

There's several ways to fix this, depending on a few things. The best thing to do is avoid drywall anchors, and screw directly into a stud. If there's one close enough that it looks okay, you should do that. You'll have to patch up these holes, which may be a bit of a pain to do with the textured walls, but it's doable. The next best option is probably ...


17

Drywall Anchors I have had 100% success with drywall anchors but I am very careful about all aspects of the mounting hardware. You have to design and execute your plan carefully to have success, otherwise they'll be vulnerable to pulling out as Michael Karas points out. If you mess up any aspect of what I set out below, your anchors will probably pull out....


16

What you are using are the most basic drywall anchors available. They're inexpensive and included in many products because of that, but they aren't good for much, and wouldn't be up to the task of holding something a toddler will be climbing on (you know they will...) Look for products that spread out or lock into place when they enter the wall. The name ...


15

Most things that get regularly manipulated should not be hung with hollow-wall anchors. Eventually they pull out or the wallboard disintegrates. I'd install either some 1x4 wooden rails spanning between studs or a piece of finished plywood to which I'd mount the gate. Run construction or finish screws about 1" into the studs. Imagine the typical backer ...


13

This is a tall unit and if it were fully loaded, it could really hurt someone (especially a child) should it fall. Products like the 3M command strips are designed for hooks where the force on them is acting downwards. Your cabinet on the other hand, should it tip, would be pulling away from the wall and I really don't think those strips would hold. If it ...


13

I almost always use the self-drilling stud solver type anchors. I find that they are tough enough to hang just about anything. Aside from those, the only other anchors I've found that I like are the toggle-bolt type, which are more useful if you need to hang something from the ceiling.


7

An alternative to using a large wall anchor for heavy duty mounting is to always find a wall stud for whatever item you are hanging on the wall. Then you can use a smaller gauge screw (or nail) without any type of anchor required. This will leave a smaller hole in the drywall and give you all the strength you need, but limit you to the places where you can ...


7

Get a piece of 3/4 inch plywood and cut it as wide as the gap between the studs, plus 3.5 inches. It should be about as tall as your tv. Also get a couple of 3.5 inch lag bolts or a box of 4 inch deck screws. Also get 6 or more 1 inch bolts as fat as the mounting slots on the bracket and matching t-nuts. Center the bracket on the plywood and mark the holes....


7

The standard advice is to use the stud finder, mount the bike hooks on studs, and make do with a few lost inches. But if you must get those extra inches, you can mount a 2x4 on the wall horizontally, with at least each end anchored into a stud. And then you can install your bike hook on the 2x4.


7

While having all four mount points connect to structure (aka: the stud) is ideal, I think in your case, having two mount points in wood and two in a drywall anchor, you're going to be ok. Consider this question: What is the weight capacity of a drywall screw? One drywall screw CAN (not should) hold a lot of weight for its size. Also a properly installed ...


7

For large heavy objects that you want to span multiple studs, I like a french cleat. You can buy them out of metal from the store, or make your own by ripping a board at 45 degrees along it's length. Screw in the wall part to each stud with a long screw or lag bolt, and get either a counter sunk or flush head. And on the back of the clock, you can use ...


6

You will find many many installations of towel bars that are simply the crappy drywall anchors on each end. These will work as long as the towel bar is treated with kid gloves. Anything more and eventually the towel bar will end up loose at the wall mounts. If there is not a framed in set of backing behind the towel bar location then your next best bet is ...


6

The simplest high-strength solution, if there isn't blocking behind the plaster to support it, is to mount the towel rack on an attractive piece of well-varnished wood (or a piece painted to match the room's trim) and mount that to two studs. Obviously this won't suit all tastes. Then again, no towel bar will suit all tastes.


6

EZ anchors are good but toggle bolts are better.


5

The plastic anchor is good enough if want to hang a feather dream catcher on it. These other metal ones with the big counter sunk cylinders on them are ok to hang a small picture frame on it. If you need some more hanging wieght i would recomend using these on a drywall on the empty space. Reasonably more hanging power- should hold a large picture frame 1-...


5

Try your best not to pull out the whole bracket/clip without trying to pry the nail portion out first. The anchor used in these clips are the kind that split in half inside the wall so if you pry the whole fitting out, you will end up with an unnecessarily large hole to patch. Unfortunately, as you can tell from the pictures, it's not easy to simply pry ...


5

They make many different types of wall anchors. I have used different forms of E-Z Anchors for years and am happy with them. They hold up to 100 pounds in sheetrock with their toggle lock anchors. 1 of the normal screw anchors can hold 25 pounds in half inch rock. I am sure those brackets have more than one mounting hole? Place on the wall where you ...


5

Wood screws directly into a stud are going to be many times stronger then drywall anchors. When you have hit a stud, use a screw. When you are just in the drywall, use a drywall anchor. Drilling out the strong wood to replace with weak plastic doesn't make any sense. If you really wanted to just use anchors, they make metal anchors that can be driven ...


5

You will NOT want to support your 78 1/2 inch rod from the drywall alone. Drywall fastened up to the ceiling is a pretty good challenge just holding up it's own weight then yet you trying to add 70 pounds to that. So what you want to do is to locate the support members (usually called ceiling joists) to which the drywall is attached. You would then want to ...


4

The wall is already damaged - nails do that to walls - so you're looking at fixing the wall no matter what. With that in mind, you want a hammer, a small pry bar, a small quantity of joint compound or "wall repair spackle" (the latter is in the paint department), a sponge, a 1" putty knife, 1 pint or quart of primer and an equal quantity of interior paint ...


4

I'd find mounding hardware with a wide base, then use the 't-bolts' to anchor them (it's a bolt with spring-loaded 'wings' that expand inside the wall to grab the back-side of the sheetrock). The wider the base, the better, as it will distribute the load over a larger area of sheetrock. As for tensioning, you really do want the turnbuckle, as the cable ...


4

We once used 1x2 wood across the length of the window trim to attach blinds to. It might be a bit excess, but with added surface area being screwed into the wall, much stronger. You could paint it the color of the window trim (or stain) before hand so its less noticeable. It worked for the blinds because the blind ran the entire span of the window. ...


4

This article has a beautiful summary of the different types of anchors.


4

There are plastic anchors. My suggestion, avoid them like the plague. I much prefer the self-drilling that Eric posted, easier to install and much stronger hold in my experience. With these, you have to pre-drill the hole, get it too small and it doesn't fit and you have to drill again, or it gets stuck partially and you have to rip it out or try to mash ...


4

If this is a wall to wall carpet then the back edge of the cabinet most likely sitting on the tacking strip that is placed around the edge of the room under the carpet. Making the cabinet lean forward slightly. You could try placing one or 2 shims under the front edges of the cabinet to level cabinet or even raise the front a bit so it tends to lean back ...


4

You may be able to run the screw right into the framing with out using the anchors. It will hold much better if it is framing and not wood lath or masonry. if the brackets are directly over the window, you may have found the header.


4

It depends on the type of anchor and the length of the screw, but I think you may have another problem. Most drywall anchors rely on the screw to expand the anchor and secure it into the drywall. In these cases, if the screw is not into the anchor to an adequate depth, the anchor will not have sufficient purchase in the sheetrock. With this said, however, ...


4

Use toggles, but also put at least one good fastener into the stud. (Even if you have to drill a new hole/holes in the mount.)



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