Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Sure, I don't see why not. All the AC coils are behind and underneath but I'd use sheet metal screws (no chance of penetrating the inner wall) as I'm not a fan of rivets. Inside the fridge wall it's just full of spray foam. Puncturing the inner wall is more of an aesthetic concern then worrying you might be causing some giant loss in efficiency. Consider ...


0

In my quest to the perfectly perpendicular and/or perfectly placed hole, I have tried multiple solutions but the truth is, for truly, 100% accuracy you need: A high-quality drill press with a chuck that is made to tight specifications. Then, you need to calibrate it with a special dial indicator (even drill presses drill inaccurate holes out of the box). ...


1

Really old question, but here goes. Inside the drill, this is the gear that will make the Hammer action (an un-related example) As the drill turns, the ratchet action of caused from the teeth sliding against each other creates the hammer action you feel in Impact Drills. The Switch to activate this is obviously failing in your drill. The Complicated ...


1

The answer is yes, but not as effectively as a purposefully designed tool. Take a look at buffing and sanding tools' RPM. It's significantly higher than that of a power drill: 8,000 - 15,000 for an air powered palm sander vs 300-1,500 RPM for a standard variable speed drill. Other aspects depend upon the modular design of the particular tool you're ...


0

Can you clarify what you mean by fixed speed powerdrill? There's hammer drills and then there's rotary hammers. Most hammer drills use chucks, much like any a regular drill (albiet they have an additional means to be tightened. Rotary hammers use SDS bits, differing slightly from one another based on the brand. You can use a chuck adapter for a rotary hammer ...


1

I am more into features than power. Most important feature is multi speed function where the trigger is a speed control. Next is chuck size. Not just max size but also min bit size Reversible is cool but I don't really use it. Lastly make is a factor and generally you get what you pay for. On the DIY side drills last years. Just pay the few extra bucks, you ...


0

I ended up using diamond hole drill bits like the ones shown in Hightower's answer. Not sure why it was so difficult but I've read that tiles have varying degrees of hardness. The diamond bit cut much faster than the pointed glass/tile bit.


1

From the manual... Instructions for jack plug chargers: Place the battery pack into the tool until it “clicks” into place. Insert the charger plug into the connector as shown in figure B. Plug the charger (6) into any standard 120 Volt 60 Hz electrical outlet and let the battery pack charge initially for 12 hours. After the initial charge, under ...


3

3/8 inch is the maximum shaft diameter that fits in the chuck. That doesn't mean you can't drill larger holes, but the part the drill chuck grips has to be this size or smaller. (Some higher-powered drills have half -inch chucks.) Bits should be widely available -- home centers, hardware stores, most places that sell tools.


1

According to a recent issue of Fine Woodworking, impact drivers are magnificent for driving screws into wood -- the bit rarely "cams out" of the screw, and the screw "just seems to melt into the wood". The major downside of impact drivers is that they are much noisier than an ordinary drill or driver; hearing protection is highly recommended and your ...


-1

I do have some experience drilling screws as that's about all I use for fasteners; I don't use nails. You don't need torque adjusters, speed dials and all that other mumbo-jumbo. I do use a magnetic bit holder if I'm one-handing it. Before I discovered this, I used to strip heads and wreck bits, but now I use the same bit for a long time and don't think ...



Top 50 recent answers are included