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0

It's been a long while since I worked construction, but I think I remember dowelling into concrete in a similar manner with a 1/2" drill bit and #4 rebar. We used a sledgehammer to drive the rebar pegs in. It MAY have been a larger bit, but I think I remember it being the same size.


1

Not really. I did this and regretted it. The problem is that the rotary hammers that are worth it are very heavy and overbuilt (the larger Bosch SDS series etc.). They make fantastic rotary hammers but are too heavy for use as a drill for extended use unless you have really beefy forearms. In this scenario, you should get a 18v cordless drill for when you ...


1

You have answered your own question. Yes you could buy a hammer-drill and use it in "drill" mode. The drawbacks are size and weight. Additionally, some hammer-drills are equipped with a chuck that will not accommodate small drill bits, by small I mean less than 1/8". A better option would be to get a hammer-drill and use it for heavy work, including ...


0

This guy had a really good idea for a DIY drill guide, using mirrors to keep your drill bit aligned. Looks like it might work better than any of the drill guides shown here. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tMfZvxTvHGM


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I have always had Ni-Cads, since my first Sears Craftsman 12 professional drill/driver bought back in the late 1980's. I changed it out years ago in 2005 for a Bosch 18 volt Ni-Cad. I used to do renovations, which I found very hard on cordless tool batteries. I have learned over the years that any battery does not like getting over hot. So the key thing ...


1

Is your dishwasher configured so that you can attach it to the sides of the cabinets instead? This method would only require a normal wood drill bit for a pilot hole. You may want to put some tape or a depth stop collar around the bit so that you don't drill all the way through the cabinet walls though. An employee at a local kitchen store told me that I ...


0

I would use a hole saw with magnetic base. (you can rent them) Set the Drill Depth Gage to be just under the material thickness of the Metal so that the drill will stop just before the inner metal surface. Drill Nice and slow and keep some Cutting liquid nearby to keep the hole nice and cool. Also. the Magnetic base will help to hold the shavings onto ...


0

Diesel gases ARE flamable and explosive. An empty tank that has not been cleaned up internally from diesel residuals is a bomb. There was a serious accident in the news last year when two people went to examine a tank with a lamp (with a naked flame). When drilling steel, sparks might be created and ignite the air-gases mixture. You CAN'T use magnets (as ...


2

A couple really strong magnets might work. Place one on the floor where you want to drill, slide the other along the underside of the floor until you feel them meet. The top magnet might slide along the floor to meet the bottom magnet, in which case you'd have to reposition the upper magnet to exactly where you want it before marking the spot. The bottom ...


2

The most common technique (other than careful measuring and mapping) is to drill a very small pilot hole through the flooring alongside the baseboard. The hole can be less than 1/8 and you can run a straightened clothes hanger through the hole to find it in the basement. The hole would probably be behind or under the appliance, if the location were good, or ...


14

Seriously: You just don't. Reasons: You'll never be able to guarantee you didn't contaminate the fuel unless you clean it thorougly after the work, which you cannot with all the diesel in there. That bears great (financial) risks. If you sell that stuff you might even get sued. Special drills and precautions will surely reduce that risk, but it will ...


4

User assumes all responsibility! Adding CO2 to displace the O2 sounds like a reasonable precaution. Use a knockout punch from Greenlee. Quite pricey though, do not buy a cheap one. Good up to 2.5 mm (10 gauge), meaning it's not going to like 3+mm but it will probably work once. Advantage is you only have to drill a 1/4" or 1/2" hole. This does require ...


9

You don't want to "drill" a 1" hole in 3mm sheet. Without support the edge would be ragged and other problems would occur, such as fragments dropping into the tank. The best approach is probably to use an annular grinder. They are used for putting holes in tile and glass. Search for "diamond hole saw" on Amazon. Use a lot of water to cool it and the slowest ...


1

Drilling down from the top is going to make it difficult to keep all of the tailings out. Having never done this myself (couldn't pay me enough), I can't speak to the safety of drilling into a partially filled diesel tank. What I can say is that I know others have done this and that diesel has a significantly higher ignition temperature than gasoline, and ...


-1

Some random thoughts: I wonder if it could help things to pour liquid nitrogen over the spot where you want the hole for a few hours before starting (and while you're making the hole) You'd be cutting into a slab of congealed diesel fuel that would hold back the diesel, and collect any shavings... Of course, the low temp might change the steel strength ...


9

Okay I'm going to start this with a giant disclaimer in capital letters: DO NOT DRILL HOLES IN TANKS CONTAINING 3300 LITERS OF DIESEL FOR THE LOVE OF GOD. Having said that (and hoping that your asking this question purely for academic reasons) i would say: start by filling the empty space above the fuel with argon, its the fumes that burn not the liquid, so ...



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