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2

You can also drill halfway through the board, then turn it around and drill from the other side using the pilot hole to properly align the drill. The scrap piece will end up only halfway in the hole saw, and it's much easier to grab hold of it and remove it.


1

I'm too late to help the original ask-er with his project. But if you don't need the plugs, use a spade bit instead of hole-saw when possible. (I came across this post to I was asking the same question, but I need the plugs - drywall - to be able to put back in place.)


0

If the window frames are made of wood, I would use wood filler to fill the holes. You won't be able to conceal the holes from a forensic crime-scene examiner but that is not your goal. You need to restore the property to a state that will satisfy a reasonable owner that you have looked after it and kept it in good repair so that it can be rented out once ...


2

You're looking for a very specific use. You're on a wall face, and you're trying to adjust some holds. I get that it's important to be able to do this one-handed, with a light weight "screw gun", but it seems like you're using the wrong tool for the job. I'm not going to tell you to get a wrench or impact drill though. This is one of those cases where you ...


1

Having the tool locked is abslutely fine - it's not a 'maximum torque' issue - well, at least until you get up to very high torque! The spindle lock is going to be able to cope with more torque than you can manually apply. This doesn't mean you can add a lever arm to it - that would be a bad idea - but don't be afraid to crank on it when locked. As ...


5

You can but it would be easier and more efficient to bring a manual wrench. A wrench or ratchet will let you apply your torque closer to the same plane as the head of the bolt. Turning the drill will be like a ratchet with an extension on it. Use the right tool for the job, your tools, your watch, and your wallet will thank you for it!


3

Yes, you can use the driver in "passive mode" for your final turns. It is better to avoid holding the trigger during these turns, because while you're holding the trigger the driver's motor will be energized. As the motor is no longer providing sufficient torque to turn the screw, this energy is being wasted. At best it's wasting power, and at worst it's ...


2

The tackles carpet strips installed on masonry surfaces have short evenly-spaced concrete nails on every strip. They are set in position and with a well placed hammer strike the point of the nail penetrates the concrete securing the strip tightly. Of course in the real world not every nail hit goes as planned. It's a good idea to have a few spares on hand ...


3

Typical AC line powered power tools do use universal type motors that use carbon brushes contacting with the copper poles of the rotating commutator on the motor shaft. It is not uncommon to see sparks at the interface point between the carbon brush and the commutator as the motor operates. The amount of sparking will often reduce as the brushes wear in ...


2

Your search within the forums gave you the right answer. Your picture gives a hint (if I zoom in) that your machines motor is of a brushed type too, so having sparks is pretty normal.


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I'd create a channel out of wood blocks for the cylinder to lie in and pad it with a cloth. Something like this: Image source and more info Then I'd use an awl or nail set to create a divot in the surface of the acrylic. This will help prevent bit crawl, though a drill press usually takes care of that for you if you secure the work piece well. Acrylic ...


0

Would an aviation bit work in this situation? An aviation bit is like a standard drill but but much longer, say 12" or 18" or so. Sometimes you can get the working end of the bit to where you need it when the drill itself is further away, beyond your obstacle.


1

If you are drilling a hole through 3 pieces, and you do not want to purchase a 12" "twist" (metal bit) bit to do the job, which would be the way to do it. If you choose to use the shorter version, there is a way to do that too. Main thing is, is to use a twist bit since it is full round so to speak and once it starts in a direction, it usually will not ...


0

There are a number of tricks, ranging from placing a mirror next to the hole so you can see more easily whether you are really drilling perpendicularly to the board's surface to using a small square to check this to using a small jig with a guide bushing to hold the nit at the right angle. However, this does not sound like an application where perfect ...


3

You could try clamping something rigid and relatively straight (like a T-square or 1x4) to the beam and then using that to ensure it's perpendicular. Then measure your holes and drill with, say, your knuckles making contact on the rigid surface If I were you, I'd just buy a longer bit tho. Sounds like a waste, but when you need the right tool, you need the ...


2

I've removed hundreds of screws with drywall guns over the years for various reasons (changes of plans, later access by subcontractors). Never has a screw stripped in the wood. You might ask yourself if you're using appropriate screws for the job. IMO, fine-thread screws are for metal framing. My point is that the reverse function works just as expected ...


3

I am a granite top fabricator and every time i drill a hole in granite or marble it always scares me think,what if i crack this top if i make the slightest error so i better pay attention and take my time because the slightest error can break your stone top even with experience it is nerve racking. first you need a hole saw guide. cut a guide hole with ...


2

Rule of thumb on the step drill bit is it should be used on metal half as thickness of each step. In the pics listed, the long thin would be used for thicker metals because each step is thicker. The fat wide bits are for thinner sheet metal. Keep in mind, the cutting edge is the thickness of the step. It will go through metal that is thicker, but if you ...


0

Yes, you can drill and tap the hole for threads. You may have figured that out already.


1

Purchase a towel bar to your liking that has the bar as a separate piece, longer than the spacing you need. Cut the bar to the length you need and install. I have had to cut the bar on occasion when the space was too small for the bar on the wall, so I made it shorter.The same idea should work for you.



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