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1

Variant on 1) Fill the hole with epoxy, let harden, drill pilot hole in epoxy for screwed, mount the coathanger. You might want to make the original hole slightly oversize so a good ring of epoxy remains after drilling pilot holes. Using this method, the screws will be removable.


1

First you have to remove the chuck assembly from the drill.You have to put the drill assembly in a vise. Tighten vise around the front of the chuck first then use a large channel lock pliers around the large part of the chuck assembly, and turn counterclock wise and the bit should come out. Put the chuck assembly back on.


1

Check your Tile bit to see if you have melted the edge. normally it should feel nice and sharp against your finger. Hopefully you have a nice drill (generally battery operated may be a little on the light side). What I do, is get a straw filled with water, or a spray bottle, and get a helper to either "pipette" or spray water onto the hole while you ...


2

Purchase a 4pc. Ryobi glass and tile bit set which has 1/4 and 5/16 bits. Purchase #10-12 (blue)( 1/4 drill bit) or 14-16 (green)(5/16 drill bit) drywall anchors with screws, enough for how many holes you need to drill. Tape the tile with masking tape where your holes need to be, mark the tape and drill thru the tape. This will keep the drill from walking ...


0

I have used glass bits, which may be the same as a tile bit, with great success. 30-60 seconds per hole. Sometimes the bit would get too hot and melt the solder or brazing that holds the point in place which would then do bad things, that's where dipping the bit in water comes into play. Not letting the bit get to hot is a big issue, whether the point fails ...


2

If it is a steel shank drill bit, grind off where it's striped, ~2". Otherwise just skip to grinding three flats, 120 degrees apart to give the chuck something to grab. Back the bit out and start over with a nice, fresh battery. Corded drills with keyed chucks are way down in price. Using one of them could most likely get you out of this situation and would ...


2

I'd start by seeing if I could get a set of locking pliers to clamp onto the shaft and try to turn it by hand.


2

Get some flat bar and drill the hole size that you require. clamp the flat bar into position over the existing hole (in the correct position). Then drill or file into the flat bar hole (acting as a guide/template) to your desired position.


0

the only way I think you can be truly accurate is to tack-weld or rivet a new piece layer of flat steel over the existing pilot hole. Then drill a new pilot hole, then drill final size. Then remove the extra steel layer. The extra layer of steel will basically act as a drill bit guide to keep your bit centered in your new pilot hole.


1

I have used (carefully - they are brittle - wear saftey glasses and work slowly) solid carbide diamond-pattern "tile-cutting-bits" (for Roto-zipĀ®, DremelĀ® or similar tools) as a side-grinding tool in a drill to correct holes in metal. I generally lubricate them with oil. Don't waste a diamond bit on this (diamond, when grinding steel, unless very carefully ...


2

You should be able to "pull" the hole back to centred as you step up the drill sizes. Just aim for (or with small drills towards) the correct centre and each step up in size will get closer and closer to being correctly centred.


0

Other methods: Drill with the spade bit then put the log in a lathe and enlarge the hole out with a boring tool. As above but put the boring bit in the lathe and bring the log to the tool. You'd do this if the log is too big for the lathe. Drill lots of small holes covering the area of the intended hole, then chisel out the remaining wood.



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