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5

Screwdriver bits are generally considered consumable. Regardless of the brand, they eventually break/wear out. Hardware stores sell them in packs of 5-10 for exactly that reason. I wouldn't put too much stock in what kind of tool the bit originally came with. The only exception is if you're using an impact driver you might want to be a little more picky. ...


1

In an ideal world the power tool tips would be stronger. In reality the quality of the tips is anybody's guess. In general those with a large tool company's name on the package are better quality. But I have bought brand name sets that broke the first time they were used. I have had the kind you buy at discount stores work well. As with any power tool you ...


1

Simply: Mark your first hole. Use your spirit level (assuming its a good one and not a tiny boat level etc) to mark a horizontal line from the first hole out towards the second hole position. Flip the level around 180 degrees lengthways and continue the line towards the second hole. Keep flipping the level around each time you need to move until you get ...


5

Use oil to cool the bit, if oil residue is not a problem. Use water if that will be a problem. Keeping the bit cool is crucial to long bit life. The larger the hole the slower the RPM are to be used to drill the hole. Slow enough it is easy to count the revolutions is a good reference for how slow. When using a drill press the RPM are usually slower, and oil ...


7

Borrow a laser level Borrow a 4 foot mason's level Don't use a level -- use a plumb bob and HS geometry Make a plumb bob by hanging a heavy and centered weight from a chalk line and snap it in the center of your desired holes.. Now pick a point on the wall that will be your left hole and two points on your chalked line. Use a wire and measure the ...


4

Water levels and long bits of wood are good solutions. Alternately, drill one hole; have a helper run string from there; level from the taut string and mark your next hole. (When marking the second hole, try to account for any wandering that the drill bit did when you drilled the first hole.)


5

If you have a shorter level than the distance between two hole positions you can find yourself a piece of wood that is say 2 meters long that can be seen to be nice and straight. Hold this length of wood up against the wall in a horizontal position and set your level atop it. The wood can then be repositioned till the level shows a "level" position on its ...


2

One method to do this if you do not have access to a long level is to use a water level. Get yourself a length of clear plastic tubing from the hardware or auto parts store. For your application it would be good if this tubing was 5 or 6 meters long. Now hold the two ends of the tubing up in the air with the remainder of the tubing hanging down. (It can be ...


3

First you need to decide if you want one drill to do everything. It isn't always the best choice but it can be a good choice if drilling into brick or concrete is rare. Functional types Drill Driver - should include separate settings for drilling and driving. There will be a variable torque setting that avoids tearing the heads of screws. Combi Drill - ...


0

Drilling reasonable-sized holes in wood and driving screws into wood can be done with practically anything. Base your decision on price and included accessories. Drilling the occasional small hole in concrete can be done with the same tool. Drilling many holes (or larger holes) in concrete requires a hammer drill (ok, it doesn't 'require' it, but the work ...


0

The Dremel cut wheel sounds like it would make a good fanned spray. Would make a cut that looks like some of the spray novels on the bissel carpet cleaners. But to drill and try to make a mist I would start with the smallest bit. Don't drill the whole way through. Just thin the wall till you can push a tack or needle through. My theory is that the shape of ...


1

Hope you haven't done any significant damage to whatever you are hitting, and choose a different stud - or else open up the wall and look. At "1.5 to 2 inches" there's no requirement to put protective steel plates over things in the wall like wires and plumbing, so you have probably found something like that with your drill bit and very long screws.


2

Some cowboy it and hope they don't hit anything. Others cut enough holes in the drywall (and/or floor, if carpeted) to see what they are doing. If using a camera system, those can be pretty small holes. Drywall repair is a heck of a lot cheaper than plumbing and electrical repair.


1

Select a location between studs where the space does not contain any electricial devices, and it seems that it would not contain pipes devices. Drill through the top plate with a larger drill bit, of 'standard' length. Put a dowel, or single piece of solid wire in the hole until it touches the bottom. Tap both walls and both studs in the space while you ...


1

For drilling stainless steel (which is quite hard, thanks to the chromium), your best bet are cobalt-steel drill bits (here's an example). Cobalt steel drill bits are significantly harder than regular HSS drill bits and will cut the stainless steel much better, allowing easier drilling. They are characterized by a dark golden color (as opposed to lighter ...



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