New answers tagged

1

Purchase a towel bar to your liking that has the bar as a separate piece, longer than the spacing you need. Cut the bar to the length you need and install. I have had to cut the bar on occasion when the space was too small for the bar on the wall, so I made it shorter.The same idea should work for you.


0

Diamond hole saws work well for this with water. If this is anything like the stone foundations I have worked with there will never be a straight mortar line that could be used. On one of the first walls I drilled through I used a hammer drill and bit , The hammer drill caused the rock to break out on the back side and it was very tough to repair. This is ...


5

Just some things I see on jobs all the time: Do not use a power drill (you want to keep mix things). You will blow out the motor in a good power drill by using it as a mixer. I see my guys use their Makitas with a mixing rod. And have seen many ruin them. I simply give them a 30 year old craftsman electric drill I have that I would give away for $5. ...


0

Drill pilot holes and gradually widen them. This saves you energy and reduces wear on your drill bits. Always use the supplied handle to brace the drill. This keeps you from injuring your wrist if the bit catches. All these answers are along the lines of "do these things" but the list of things to not do with a drill is infinite and includes things like "...


3

If you're drilling metal, use an appropriate type of bit (HSS, whatever), use some cutting lube, and drill for short periods with breaks between. Don't run the drill too fast either. If the bit overheats you'll ruin the temper and destroy the bit. Since the title of this question really should be "tell us the dumb ways you broke stuff", I'll mention that I'...


3

If you put a hole saw onto your drill, avoid going fast and always brace it well in case it catches. I have a bad wrist to show for careless hole saw use.


9

Some other helpful hints (not from Heloise) 0) ALWAYS wear gloves and eye protection. (Note: if you're using one hand to hold down the material being drilled, a glove can reduce injury if the drill bit jams. On the other hand, you should never depend on body parts to hold things in place) 1) When drilling into soft material such as plastic or pine, ...


4

Radial loads are bad. Axial loads are good. The bearings in your drill or drill press are designed to counteract the forces in line with the drill bit. A milling machine does both, and using a drill or drill press like a milling machine will destroy the bearings quickly.


3

a drill bit is not designed to cut on the flute like an end mill. However you will see many folks making a hole larger by moving the drill off axis. It works but not clean. The biggest advice I Could give is to use cutting oil and slower speeds when cutting metal the goal would be to have a long chip develop this shows your speed and pressure are correct for ...


2

As Joe points out, if this wall is original, then it's not drywall, but plaster. You can't easily detect studs behind plaster walls with a stud detector. You likely have to use test holes. One option is to drill a largish hole in the center(ish) of where you will mount the TV. Then use a coat hanger to fish it into the hole to see if you can locate the studs ...


2

An over-100-year-old apartment building is likely plaster-over-lath. In that case, you should be able to drill through the plaster and into the lath to sink wood screws. If this is so, you'll see what looks like sawdust on the tip of the drill when you pull it out. I'd probably use a bunch more than just the 4 recommended, but it'll hold a TV under 50 lbs....


2

It has to be at least 2" away from the top, or bottom of the joist. As far as distance from the ends, there are no rules: Holes: Do not bore holes closer than 2" from joist edges, nor make them larger than 1/3 the depth of the joist. –engineering.purdue.edu, PDF If you look at the document, it clearly states and depicts the top or bottom, with no ...


1

These are all good points. I'm going to provide some comments. Your tub is made of an enamel coated steel. It's thin sheet steel so it's easy to work with, however it's not a ten second per hole job of fiber glass or acrylic. You should gauge down your bits (start with a small bit, and work to larger bits) until you hit the goal. Also, don't use ice water,...


1

Well titanium bits are OK for thin sheet metal but note that the titanium is just a coating on the bit. Once the coating is worn off they are really just your run of the mill cheap steel bits. Which is the situation you have here. The only reason your drilling is prolonged is because basically your bit is toast now. You are basically just rubbing the ...


2

It looks like you're starting with a pretty large bit. I like to use the smallest bit I have (don't apply too much pressure, as skinny bits break easy) and work up. You're drilling more holes overall, but each one goes a lot quicker.


2

The wall plug may have a size molded into it, or the packaging will say. At any rate, the right size is usually the diameter at the widest point of the plug's taper (if present), not counting a flange. It should not take a lot of force to set the bare plug. In the case of masonry (and most other materials) you can err on the small side and work larger until ...


2

Should I be worried if grease leaks from inside the new electric drill? No. You should only be worried if it continues to leak out after being regularly used and cleaned for a week or so. It looks like it might be a low-cost no-brand hand-held cabled electric-drill. So if it was bargain priced I'd be happy there is some evidence that the assembler used ...


3

It's a tool, and they use grease during assembly. The jaws of the chuck should have grease on the outer surface where they meet the collar. Spots of grease elsewhere are incidental and shouldn't be cause for concern. Those aren't necessarily assembled in "white glove" conditions. Further, once you use it, since it has moving/spinning parts, you might see ...



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