New answers tagged

1

Presuming you can find long enough bits (you can), and presuming you don't want the pointy ends of your drill chuck scraping and boring your fiberglass, you want to use a drill depth stop. You'll slide this onto the bit to the exact depth you want, tighten the set screw, then drill. If you're extremely concerned about drilling perfectly perpendicular holes, ...


2

This is more of a shopping question. I just looked before I answered the question and I have two 1/16" bits at around 3-4 inches (sorry too lazy to get the tape out). Put them in your drill with 2 inches sticking out and drill. Will they break? Maybe. You will only break them because you are trying to do it too quick. You are drilling really nothing, ...


3

A quick visit to a metalworking supplier website finds 3" long (overall length) ones with 1.7" cutting depth (presumably the flute depth, so for light-duty drilling if you "peck" (pull out to clear chips) when you get deep you could probably get it done. "Extended-Reach Drill Bits" A more extensive search might find a longer one. Buy them by the dozen, you ...


0

above is correct, the drills should be stamped hss on the blank bit of the drill where the chuck would grip it,the only other thing is if someone has reground it to cut another material ie put a neg rake on the cutting face but you would easily see this if it has been ground,the age will not matter I am a 60 year old toolmaker and i still use drills from ...


0

No concrete hard enough with a standard Hammer Drill with a masonry bit. Just drill a hole, then use one of those cheap plastic wall anchors. With the plastic anchor in place, you now have a screw-friendly hole. Unfortunately, this is the only reliable solution.


4

If you're referring to the hole at top center in your photo, you'd have a hard time drilling a new hole halfway overlapping an old hole. A better approach would be a rotary grinding tool. Any abrasive grinding bit will allow you to enlarge the hole enough to get the bolt through. Be aware that this will tend to heat the part being worked. A damp rag on the ...


0

If they are HSS quality bit's they would still be usable.Try by first drilling into wood.Then use a drop of oil and try on an aluminum block.Old bits are of great help with wood and plastics.Rarely would they break up and damage anything as long as you take care.Wear safety goggles. By the way...as they cost a bomb in India, I regrind broken bit's and temper ...


0

Menards and other places rent core drills for large holes in concrete. Easiest way is to call Diamond Drilling or a similar company and have them come out and drill all your holes for a few hundred dollars. Unless you want to buy a Hilti DD100 and the bits which will cost you way more than hundreds.


1

The terms are all a bit muddled these days. But there's cordless/corded screw drivers, drills and impact drivers. Impact Drivers Impact drivers have a rotating hammering mechanism that can deliver momentary instantaneous impacts of torque to the workpiece, each larger than the recoil that you feel in your hand. They are appropriate for heavy duty ...


2

The main difference to pay attention to is a drill vs. a driver. At the core, they are essentially the same in that they turn a bit. A driver, however, also has a clutch. That's the key difference. With a drill, you want continuous power on the drill bit. However, with a driver, you want continuous power up to a point at which point you want to stop the ...


2

I use a power screw driver that is specifically designed for driving screws. It has the motor geared down to a slower speed than a normal electric drill so that it can deliver a lot more torque to the screw. It also has a clutch mechanism that allows a depth stopper to be attached and cuts off the drive to the bit when the depth is reached....really handy ...


-2

Do it by eye , I did through a brush pole with a 19mm bit all the way through .



Top 50 recent answers are included