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1

Did I need a stronger Drill? Perhaps not, often you can just lubricate the screws before driving them. People suggest soap, I've sometimes dipped screws in a light grease (which can leave marks on the wood). This really makes a huge difference. Another alternative is to drill small pilot holes before inserting the screws. The width of the drill needs ...


0

The low voltage drills like the one you have are mostly good as a powered screwdriver for assembling flat pack furniture. This type of application usually already has a pilot hole drilled, so the drill doesn't have to work to displace material as it drives the screw. The key performance parameter that your drill is lacking is a high enough maximum torque. ...


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Hammer Drill: good for drilling holes in masonry and stone. Percussion Drill: good for use with screw-driving jobs into metal and wood. It ensures the best performance. Drill Driver: good for drill setting for boring holes, or the driver setting for loosening screws. Powered Screwdrive: good for easy handling. According to your convenience use any of ...


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Are you talking about a hammer drill? I have found that indispensable since first getting one to sink shields in to my cement floors and walls to construct custom shelving. It makes quick work of all heavy drilling.


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Which would be more useful, if I could only purchase one or the other? A screwdriver might be good if you are about to move into an unfurnished home and assemble a zillion items of flat-pack Swedish furniture and then never ever do DIY again. Of course you'll spend a lot of time waiting for your screwdriver to charge up. Otherwise, if I could buy only ...


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Most electric drills have screw driver attachments that are fine for screwing in but not for screw removal. When you remove a screw, the fingers that grab the screwdriver come apart (as if you were removing a drill bit).


2

Badly worn brushes or worn/tired/broken brush springs will do this. They may be easy or hard to access, depending on the designer.


2

If it's a corded drill, that's a common sign that the cord is going bad and it's time to replace it. It might also be the power switch (see below). If it's a battery drill then look to the power switch. Dirty contacts will cause intermittent power loss. You may just have to spray some contact cleaner into the switch assembly and work it a few dozen times, ...


2

Pre-drilling is not just about wood-splitting. It fundamentally changes the nature of the joint. Take the example of screwing decking to joists. If you were to pre-drill the deck board so the hole was WIDER than the screw but the screw is allowed to bite into the joist. The joint becomes much like a nut-and-bolt where the entire joint is held in place by ...


1

The reason the hole is drilled is to remove excess material so that when the screw bites in, it does not rip the wood (or whatever) apart. It's simple physics. When the screw does in, if there is no hole, then the wood volume occupied by the shank of the screw is displaced. Where do you think that wood goes? Outer space? Forcing screws into wood using an ...


8

If the wood is prone to splitting, it'll still split when you don't drill pilot holes, impact drill or not.


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You can use your rotary hammer if you don't mind the fact that the hole will not achieve perfection on quality. But you can use bigger drills and not overexploit your tool. If you need perfect holes (like you need at wood, for example) then you must use hammer drill. But with smaller drills!


1

You could use a flexible shaft bit holder It easily bends to 90 degrees, is designed to be used with hex shaft bits and takes up less room than a 3/4 inch bit. Images and links are for illustration only, not an endorsement of products/sources.


1

You could try a 90 degree drill bit adapter.



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