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1

For a professional, a cordless drill is a no-brainer. You're frequently away from a power source, moving around all the time, using it frequently enough that keeping it charged isn't a concern, and using it so hard that it will likely burn out and require replacement before the battery dies and the product line becomes obsolete and they don't sell batteries ...


3

Go to any site where they are building homes. 80-90%+ of drills there will be cordless. Until the past 5-10 years most consumer cordless drills were almost worthless for heavy duty jobs. But that simply isn't true anymore. The big boxes carry good brands and you can get more than enough power from a $200 cordless drill that comes with two batteries and ...


0

I purchased a new Black and Decker 7.5 volt drill (my first) and mid way my first project this happened to me. I was pretty upset that I would have to buy a strap wrench, however rummaging through my tool box looking for my slider wrench I came found some heavy duty plastic ties, and it worked. Although the chuck has some scars from the exercise.


1

I'm guessing here, but it sounds like you're trying to drill into stone/cement/concrete. If so, you need a drill bit meant for rock and a percussion/ hammer drill. You can buy cheapy hammer drills that won't last very long (harbor freight comes to mind if you're in the US), or rent them. Oh, and the only thing you don't want to drill into is ...


3

For your safety, you absolutely must use a drill guide that is firmly clamped to the workpiece. Whether you buy one or make one is up to you. This diameter bit is too large for you to be able to control it by hand (and a spade bit will be worse than forstner in this regard as well). I gave myself a black eye when trying to drill holes this large and the ...


3

If you are set on using a hand-drill, there are jigs available that will keep the drill perpendicular to the object being drilled. Alternatively, holding a level against the drill will help you keep it aligned. I would suggest using a Forstner bit instead of a spade bit. Spade bits can jump around a bit, tear out and are not that precise. They are good ...


1

Sounds like it might be referred to as a "Tungsten carbide buffing disc".


2

Position the rack so you can screw into the studs. If that is not practical then mount a sheet of decent thickness plywood onto the wall surface and fasten that to the studs wherever possible. The rack can then mount onto the plywood. If you use a plywood that is 3/4' inch (19 or 20mm) thick then the screws for the rack need not even penetrate the drywall at ...


1

Resurrecting an old thread, but another idea... 1/2" pvc pipe with 1/8" holes drilled. Then slide 1" sections of heat-shrink tubing over each hole and shrink to tight fit. Then poke a TINY hole (very fine needle) into the tubing. My concerns would be the shrink wrap tubing tearing out under too-high pressure (like, U.S. public line pressure), or the ...



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