New answers tagged

1

Alternatives that cover everything for DYI needs There is no such thing. Whatever you buy now, you will miss something at some point in your DIY life. It may be less obvious than it looks. My recent example: I was running a conduit in my garage, and was fixing the clips to the wall with screws. The bits that come with my electric screw driver turned out ...


4

It's called a center punch. There are also automatic center punches, which don't require a hammer.


3

You cannot cut or drill heat tempered glass. Not waterjet, not laser, not hot needle, not under water. Physics, not technique. There is no secret formula for cutting or drilling tempered glass. You can do edge work if you are careful, but you are weakening the edge substantially in doing so. IF you don't remove too much glass it may not break. If you ...


3

Yes. As long as your wife says it's okay, you should buy a new drill. Not only will you be getting a new tool, you'll also be stimulating the economy.


1

A rotary hammer is the standard tool for a job like this, with a carbide-tipped masonry bit. You can rent a heavy-duty model at your local rental center. They're not difficult to use. Be sure to wear ear, eye, and resipration protection. As for your question about depth, you haven't provided nearly enough information about your plans for anyone to ...


1

dont use any of the diy junk people are mentioning up above - its all overpriced and slower than molasses in january. use these: http://oceandiamondtools.com/Core-Bit-Wet-Blue-Photo.html they chuck up on a variable speed grinder (5/8-11 stub) and are used with regular wetting. a 6mm hole like what you are probably doing will take about 20 seconds in ...


1

I install these items professionally in commercial buildings. Hammer drills with sds bits are the way to go. Just be careful not to crack the tile.


0

Useful if you catch a mistake before driving the screw all the way, and costs very little to include in the tool's design... I haven't used one of these, but I suspect there may also be a way to temporarily disable the clutch.


4

Yes, you can. You can't exactly CUT a hole, but you can GRIND a hole, if you're gentle and patient. This feller demonstrates grinding tempered glass. About half-way down this page, "sammiesoo" claims to have sand-blasted and ground tempered glass before. This forum also discusses methods for grinding tempered automotive glass. So the answer is hardly ...


1

I'm going to go with the first comment and say that it's not possible. Tempered glass can not be cut, scored or sandblasted. Doing so will result in the glass shattering. Laminate glass can be cut, tempered can not.


-5

You can. Yes, the tempered glass will completely shatter if this is even attempted. But if you can use a steel needle or stylus absolutely thin and spikes, you can. Then placing a hard wood behind the glass you must use the stylus very gently tapping with a hammer. After a long time, you can drill a hole. Necdet Ekin


14

You can't. The tempered glass will completely shatter if this is even attempted. If you absolutely must have tempered glass with a hole in it, the hole or any other shaping must be done before the tempering process.



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