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34

Here are some charts from Bolt Depot. Bolt Depot is a handy resource, and has lots of information about all different types of fasteners. Pilot hole size: Wood Screw Diameter: ****Major thread diameter** is measured on the outside of the threads.*


30

I'm not an authority, but start with this: Keep the bit inline with the screw's direction of penetration. Most times I see newbies struggle with that. If the drill/chuck is cocked in relation to the axis of the screw, it creates all kinds of trouble. Firmly push inward, not letting the bit slip back out of the screwhead. Bits are consumable. They don't ...


25

Drills and impact drivers are similar in that they're both rotating power tools and they have some overlap in usage, but they work differently and have different strengths. Drills apply a constant torque and tend to have good control across a range of speeds and clutch settings. They're good for work that requires care or precision, like drilling a hole or ...


25

Yes, the drill chuck will mar the finish of the shelf. There is a slight chance of damage to the chuck. Plus, choking down on the bit, like that, obscures your view of the hole (the drill and chuck block it) -- making precision harder to accomplish. The correct way to do this is to use a drill stop. Drill stops are less likely to slip than tape or ...


24

I usually just wrap a piece of masking tape around the drill bit leaving the correct length exposed. You can either wrap enough layers of tape around so that it is fairly thick, or leave a "flag" of tape sticking out. Either way will let you drill to the proper depth without the risk of marking the surface. The metal jaws of a drill can easily damage the ...


24

Homemade Stops Wrap a bit of tape around the bit, to mark the desired depth. Then carefully drill your holes, stopping when you've reached the tape. I've also seen this done with a bit of wire. WARNING: Wrapping the wire in the wrong direction, can lead to property damage, injury, and death. Store Bought Stops Or you could purchase a drill stop. ...


23

A real simple technique I use is to hold up the drill bit and the screw. Hold the shaft of the drill bit up in front of the screw. You should only be able to see the threads of the screw (and maybe a bit of the screw). If you can't see the threads the drill bit is too big. If you can see too much of the screw, the bit is too small. I hope this helps!


19

They sell what is called an "Offset" drill. Instead of the chuck being inline with the motor, it is turned 90°. They also make drills where the chuck can be turned to get into tight spots. They also make an offset attachment for most drills.


19

If you can use a drill with a screwdriver bit to drive a screw, then most of the time, use it. Here's when you might be smarter to use a screwdriver: The screw is going into a pre-tapped (threaded) hole in metal, or plastic, or any soft material. Always at least start such screws by hand -- so that you can avoid cross-threading them. Putting screws into ...


18

Buy a $5 drywall dimpler, the bit will slip off the screw head when the screw is at the appropriate depth.


18

Your best bet would be to get some 1/2" PVC Couplings with threaded port and some Misting Nozzles. You should be able to find them both online, or at your local landscaping/gardening center. This setup would allow you to get the desired spray pattern, by selecting the appropriate nozzles.


17

Put the drill in reverse, firmly grip the chuck (the part you were calling the head) and gently squeeze the trigger up the point that you cannot hold on. If you hear clicking, and it doesn't torque very much, you need to turn the torque setting up to the maximum (the highest number, or the drill setting if it has one). If it still doesn't budge and you're ...


16

It is possible that there are several reasons for the screw head destruction. You may be using an electrical tool that is not at all suitable for driving screws. Some tools designed for drilling holes are not going to offer enough torque at a low enough speed to properly drive screws. If your tool starts out with a huge burst of speed it can almost ...


15

Seriously: You just don't. Reasons: You'll never be able to guarantee you didn't contaminate the fuel unless you clean it thorougly after the work, which you cannot with all the diesel in there. That bears great (financial) risks. If you sell that stuff you might even get sued. Special drills and precautions will surely reduce that risk, but it will ...


14

Flat-head / slotted screws come in many sizes. Having a correctly-fitting bit helps a lot. Too narrow or too thin and you'll damage the head. Too wide and you'll damage the work. Too thick and it won't fit. Fingernails, coins, and knives are non-optimal. Make sure your bit is properly aligned in the the slot. Keep the drill directly in line with the screw. ...


13

You might use a half-round rasp or file.


12

There's a GREAT article here. I'd highly recommend checking it out. Here's a brief excerpt (ALL CREDIT GOES TO THE ORIGINAL AUTHOR!): Nickle Cadmium (NiCd) Pros: NiCd batteries are more difficult to damage from heat and impact. NiCd batteries have a longer cycle life of about 1,000 charges. They put out strong current flow. They are less easily damaged ...


12

you can use a bit of scrap wood that is the length of the expose drill bit minus the depth you want to drill so that when fully drilled through with the chuck touching the scrap it will only leave the desired drill depth exposed this way you can use the scrap as a guide as you drill and also ensure the hole is square that or use a drill press if you have ...


12

Aim for a stud or well away from the stud. If a line goes through a stud, there should be a metal safety plate on the stud that will keep you from going any further. Lines that go up and down the wall will frequently be attached to the stud with staples (any electrical line running vertically will be attached) so you want to avoid just missing the stud to ...


11

I have a hand-tighten chuck on my cordless (a Makita) and I've never had any issues. However most of my bits are spin-resistant (i.e. they have chamfers). I've used it with a step bit to drill 7/8" holes through stainless steel. If that drill has a user-replaceable chuck, you could always just start with the stock one and upgrade if needed...


11

The general method I use to make a bigger hole is to take a scrap piece of plywood (1/4" works great) or pegboard or similar that is a bit bigger than the hole, clamp/screw/hold it in place, then use the correct size hole saw to drill through that and into the board. This gives enough of a start to keep the hole saw in place to drill the rest of the way ...


10

A knockout punch is typically capable of going through thicker metal - at the very least, it will do it faster. A quick search easily finds knock-out punches that can do 10 gauge steel, where most step bits don't seem like they'd do well beyond 16 gauge (though I can't find anything that really says the limit). For thin metal though, the step drill bit is ...


10

Electrical wires typically run either vertically, up and down the side of a stud (with staples), in order to reach receptacles, ceiling lights/fans, etc., and horizontally in order to get across the room(s). The vertical wires are typically pretty easy to avoid: avoid drilling/nailing above a receptacle or light switch, or, if you have to, avoid missing on ...


10

If you didn't strip the holes when removing the old bolts, then you PROBABLY should be able to re-use the same holes, but to be safe, I would inject a little Elmer's wood glue (just a few drops) into each hole before you insert the bolts. This is just to reinforce the wood in the hole and help ensure it stays locked in place. But honestly, I think you'd be ...


10

I started using a DeWalt compact impact driver a couple of years ago, and will never go back to a regular drill/driver again, with a few exceptions. The impact driver is superior for most types of screws in hard wood, decking and sheathing. It is also great for self tapping and self drilling screws. It rarely strips the head of the screw as long as you keep ...


10

When the drill is used as a screwdriver, the numbers indicate the torque breaking point. Higher numbers mean more torque. By breaking point, I mean the point at which torque is no longer applied. This feature is useful because you can limit the amount of torque that is applied to prevent screws, or the materials they are inserted in, from being stripped. ...


10

You don't want to "drill" a 1" hole in 3mm sheet. Without support the edge would be ragged and other problems would occur, such as fragments dropping into the tank. The best approach is probably to use an annular grinder. They are used for putting holes in tile and glass. Search for "diamond hole saw" on Amazon. Use a lot of water to cool it and the slowest ...


9

I have to ask, who gave you permission to drill into the wall? If you say your spouse, then maybe you need to take some home improvement classes at the adult education night school at your local high school! Just joking..... But seriously, if you have run into the concrete blocks, you need to use masonry bits with a hammer drill to bore the holes, and ...


9

The SDS chuck system was the original developed by Bosch. SDS Plus is an improvement on the original SDS system, but remains compatible with SDS bits, and is now the most commonly seen on the market. SDS Max is designed for the heaviest masonry work, and is incompatible with SDS/SDS+ bits. It sounds like for your application, SDS Plus would be the way ...



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