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17

Hacksaw Lots of work. BORING! Oscillating multi-tool or Rotary tool You're probably not cutting 1/8" steel with this, but it's useful for cutting very thin metal. Jigsaw A little more fun, but still a bit tedious. Make sure you use the proper blade. Reciprocating saw More fun, but you may have trouble keeping a straight line. Angle grinder ...


6

Try to slide something flat in that is the width of the drawer. I've used a plastic flexible cutting board for this purpose before. Slide it open that 1/4 inch, and try to get the flat sheet to ride over whatever is jamming the drawer--you may have to nearly close the drawer with the sheet in place to get it up and over.


6

It means the slide is 16" long and that you can pull your drawer out a full 16" relative to the slide. If your cabinet space was 20" deep, and you mounted this all the way at the back then your drawer would not come out 16" but instead 16-4=12".


6

Looks like an L corner bracket/brace. Probably worth upgrading to a metal one if it would fit: Amazon product link


5

I'm guessing these shattered because of shock or perhaps from being fully extended more than normal since the front wheel takes a lot of the weight when drawer is fully extended. The rail is acting as a lever where 10kg in the front of the drawer could easily be the equivalent of 100kg on that wheel when the drawer is fully open. The other thoughts are if ...


5

Interesting question Ryan. Over the years I have bought a lot of doors and drawer fronts, but never a drawer box as a component. I suspect if you have 6 piece drawers, you might be able to get the boxes directly from the cabinet manufacturer. I have never seen just the box components, (sides, backs, bottoms etc) listed anywhere for sale. You could check ...


4

I would purchase a complete drawer slide from IKEA. They're not expensive and then there won't be any questions as to whether they have changed the mechanics of the device or not.


4

One website for furniture plans that my wife recently found is ana-white.com. Best thing is, they're free! Each article/blog post has a materials list and instructions. There are quite a few plans for near-duplicates of brand-name furniture makers' products. Here's instructions for a dresser from the website. (I'm not sure exactly what you mean by a ...


4

Open it so it jams then back it off a bit, so whatever is causing the jam is not stuck. Then using a ruler, piece of cardboard, or other flat object, work it into the gap so it rests above the drawer contents and presses down on them (or just guides them) to free them from the drawer or frame above.


3

You push the black tab in to towards the side of the drawer. Then lift up the front edge, making sure the black tab fits through the slot. Once the black tab is clear, you can pull the drawer out a tiny bit to unhook the hook towards the back.


3

Stringers are the zigzag style angled beams that hold up conventional stairs. They are used on each side ot the staircase and sometimes in the middle as well. They hold up the treads and the risers (the vertical boards) are attached to them. Image 1 is basically floating treads on the stringers and using the risers as faces of drawer fronts. As the ...


3

The ruler idea usually works for me. If not ... If there is a draw below it, pull it out, then you may be able to reach under and up behind the jammed upper drawer and move the contents around or pull some out.


2

Remove the drawer beneath or above the stuck draw. If you can get beneath it, push up against the drawer bottom and rattle that thing around. If you can remove the drawer above the problematic one, well, your problem should be before your eyes.


2

Adam Jaskiewicz covered the basics, but I'll add a few comments. I've built exactly one "furniture grade" drawer, but several "shop grade" drawers. And I've never done a dovetail joint. So take what I say with at least one grain of salt. The basic drawer box is four sides with a groove cut into the inside for the bottom. Depending on use, you can use 3/4 ...


2

The cleanest and fastest way would be to use a power jigsaw with an appropriate blade ("for metal", small teeth). You'll still need to drill two holes in the corners to be able to turn the blade in between cuts. You'll then need a file for minor final treatment of the cuts. The cheapo way would be to use a hacksaw for the lengthwise cuts and then a series ...


2

I personally would use an angle grinder because it's a lot easier to keep a straight line. That, and you can use the same tool to clean the burrs off after. However, they're more dangerous than a jigsaw. You could always start out with a dremel and a few cutoff wheels. I mentioned burrs above. Since it looks like you've never cut metal before, be aware ...


2

There are a few tricks to drawer slides. The main things to get right are to make them parallel and co-planar (same distance from the case bottom on the right and the left side, as well as level front-to-back in the case). It helps if your case is perfectly square, so really focus on that. You'll want to determine your drawer width based on how thick the ...


2

Can you shake it a bit or get a coat hanger (or some other sturdy wire) inside and try to reposition whatever is holding it closed?


2

This type of slide decouples simply by giving the drawer a good tug in the straightout direction. It is advised to start the tug when the drawer is fully extended and then apply a steady but very firm pull. When it comes time to reinstall the drawer you reach into the drawer opening and then pull the bearing carrier tray fully out up to the face frame. ...


2

You can ring IKEA, specify the piece(s) you need and they will send you out the replacement part so you don't even need to go back to the store. When it happened to me they had forgot to include pieces so they sent it out free of charge. I'm not sure if they'll charge you if you lost it of your own accord.


1

Just figured it out. For cheaper drawers, there is a single screw on the inside of the drawer. Remove that screw from both sides to detach the drawer from the metal sliders on each side.


1

You could consider drilling a small hole in the center of the back board of each drawer. Then drill a corresponding hole through the back side of the drawer cabinet unit itself. Remove the drawer and install a piece of heavy string through the hole in the back of the drawer. On the inside if the drawer knot the string so it cannot pull through the hole in ...


1

I just opened my stuck desk drawer with a long handled spatula - the flat piece worked wonders moving the drawer contents around - worked better than the butter knife, ruler and wire coat hanger I tried :)


1

My experience is that Ikea does not sell replacements for this part. Nor could I order the part from them. I have tried replacing it with other slides and the other one broke too.


1

16" refers to the length of the slide when closed, which will usually also be the depth of the drawer you're installing them on. Your cabinet (or whatever you're installing in) would need to be at least 16" deep, plus the thickness of any false front you may have on the drawer if you want to make them flush. It's also a nominal length--I just bought these ...


1

Home Depot usually won't cut material that is not purchased new from their store. if vise then hacksaw If you can clamp the area you need to cut in a vise, I would use a hack saw. Use some corrugated cardboard in the jaws to protect the finish. You may want to watch some YouTube videos on how to properly use a hacksaw (yes there are good and bad ...


1

Well, it's like any other drawer, but the front is sized to fit completely into the cabinet rather than against the front of the frame. It looks like that particular drawer has slides that mount to the underside of the drawer, like these (not an endorsement, just an example with a good picture).


1

I've just succeeded in opening an overfilled kitchen drawer! The drawer was almost completely closed and was so accurately fitted that a thin metal ruler wouldn't slide in. I tried a piece of card; also too thick. I then used a very thin filing cabinet 'hanger' after removing the metal pieces. This, to my amazement, slid in and was wide enough to go right ...


1

In the end I had to stitch drill a hole in the base of the drawer until I could get my hand through the hole to move the items in the drawer. Having taken the drawer out it is obvious it is very badly designed and there is no other way of dealing with it.



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