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9

That sludge is really just a mix of soap, water, skin cells, hair, tooth paste and all the other lovely stuff that goes down your drain. I doubt it is fungus. You can't really prevent it. There are all sorts of chemical and non-chemical mixtures you can try to clean it out, but I think removing the trap and cleaning it out is the best bet. If the trap is ...


7

Put on good rubber gloves, preferably ones that are made for handling hazardous chemicals, and safety goggles. Make a thick paste with a cup of baking soda and cold water and spread it over the area to neutralize the sulfuric acid. Even though it has dried it is still active. Let the paste sit for 10-15 minutes before touching it. You may want to open a ...


5

It sounds like the pipe is partially blocked and water can only get through at a slower speed. The drain at the hot water is the lowest point so that's why it is coming from there. The blockage could be anything, from debris that came in through the pipe in the service closet or a sock that made it out of the washer. Since it's after where the water is ...


4

Since all of your drains are slow, you could have blocked or broken connection to the sewer system. There are companies you can hire that will come in and put a camera down the drain pipe so you can see blockages or breaks. It's been quite awhile since I had it done, so I can't remember exactly what it cost, but it seems like it was $200-$300.


4

Try something like Draino or Liquid Plumr - both are alkaline bases, which may dissolve a clog that an acid won't. For the tub especially, you may want to try just taking off the cover (if there is one) and looking to see if there is hair or something blocking it - it is easiest just to remove the stuff you can manually, then put a drain clog remover down. ...


4

My initial thought is that the proper venting is not established is your plumbing system. You need to have "air behind water" to allow everything to drain properly. Essentially it is just a vent pipe that leads to your roof so that pressure does not build up and slow the draining of your sink/tub. Just like how you would punch two holes in the top of a ...


4

Tooth paste and soap (even a little anti-bacterial) are certainly fine. Basically, you just don't want to put any harsh chemicals in there that will kill the bacteria eating away at the waste. I would avoid food and thicker items as they will not break down. I try not to allow hair, coffee grounds as they might not break down. I would definitely avoid ...


4

Admittedly, I haven't done it before but I came across instructions awhile ago (courtesy of eHow and Google). Maybe they'll be helpful. http://www.videojug.com/film/how-to-fix-a-broken-tub-trip-lever http://www.ehow.com/how_3391064_replace-triplever-bathtub-drain.html -M


3

Ordinary Drano and other clog removers are formulated mainly to dissolve hair and soap scum. For "bio-slime", you need something a little different. Look for "buildup remover" or "foaming pipe snake" products in the same area of the store as basic liquid drain openers. Use as directed, and they'll help considerably.


3

To answer the specific question of whether you need a separate vent for this sink: in my state (VA), the allowable distance between a 1 1/2" drain trap (standard size for a kitchen sink) and its vent is 6 feet. If your trap is farther from the vent than that, then you should consider adding a new vent or an air admittance valve. That said, too much ...


2

better to remove the old one, then bring it with you when you do shopping, then show to the place where is you gonna buy it, or go to the second hand renovation shop and could be they have a spare of the old bathtub. But I believe there is have somewhere. And I think they are still standard... Good luck : )


2

lqlarry is likely right, and using a snake to clean out the line is the first step. (+1 Larry) It could also be a problem with the plumbing vent. If that is the issue, you would likely hear a gurgle after you shutoff the washing machine and the water gets down to the P-trap, not unlike the sound the toilet makes at the end of the flush. The other issue I ...


2

If there is a blockage (which it sounds like there is since it's backing up) then you probably want to snake it before jetting since jetting alone is not going to remove a big blockage. How big is the drain? If it's large (like a 4" sewer line) then a power drill snake is probably not going to cut it and you need a drain auger with a larger diameter and ...


1

A stutgard? I assume this is a brand of air admittance valve (AAV)? This is basically a one way air valve that allows air into the vent to break any siphon action on the trap seals, but supposedly prevents sewer gases from coming out of the vent into the house. All the AAVs I've seen involve a lightly sprung wafer valve mechanism. They can sometimes become ...


1

To do it right you need to cut the pipe down below the height of the tile. You can get a dremel cut off wheel to cut it from the inside to the proper height.(you can attach the bit to a drill if you dont have a dremel) It looks like the the pipe is too close to the tile so you will have to cut the tile too if you can not straighten out pipe. You would then ...


1

Go with your second approach of getting the right size fitting except don't bend the pipe, just deal with the angle. You pan lip should be higher than the ending (with fittings) top of the drain pipe so it can drain but that's all you need. Why? PVC fumes are extremely toxic and you have a significantly better chance breaking the pipe than fixing the angle; ...


1

Moving water, preferably hot. If you can get a small flow that doesn't back up then it will dissolve away easily. Environmentally safe degreaser/cleaner, I prefer Simple Green Baking soda and vinegar, it will clean almost any small clog. With something that dissolves easily like soap, the extra air bubbles produced will help getting it clean with less ...


1

I haven't seen the drain guns for plumbing, only for HVAC condensation lines (for which a shop vac also does a pretty good job and has multiple uses). But a pneumatic drain gun is going to have a similar effect as a plunger, pushing out a clog as long as it's before or at the vent pipe, but not after. For anything after the vent pipe, you'll need a snake to ...


1

Snaking might help, as might opening and cleaning the trap (if water is moving slowly, you're more likely to have solids settling out, causing the water to move even more slowly). Ideally you should have a vent at the kitchen sink too; AFAIK, it doesn't have to be dedicated to the sink so you could hook up to an existing vent if you have one nearby.



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