Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

No handy references, (I was taught, as grunt labor, by a licensed civil engineer and former SeaBee, but I don't know which books it might have come from to him, or if any of them are on the web) but backfilling with something like road base (crushed rock including fines so it will pack well) and tamping it very well in thin layers (if you tamp 6" of fill, ...


1

Asphalt driveways are surprisingly flexible when new, and residential driveways are not typically compacted much past 90% — which means there is some flexibility to rework and further compact it. I corrected a high edge on mine by heating with a torch and pounding it with a 4x4 hand tamper I kept coated in non-stick cooking spray (to prevent soft ...


0

Dry pack it what I learned to call it. It is a regular mix of concrete, but it has just enough water added to it to get the concrete to "kick". This amount of water is so small, it is just enough to get the concrete to hold together when compressed in you hand with a strong squeeze.


0

There is a concrete that I have used, and it is regular concrete, and perhaps it can have gravel in it, but the type I have installed did not use any gravel/aggregate. Dry pack is what I have learned to know it by, and stone setters use it for building walls and laying flagstone sidewalks. I have used it for shower bases over PVC liner and coated it with ...


0

"PIG" the line as in the answer to this question How do I remove a wiffle ball from a pool vacuum pipe? Or run a hose from the other end with an expandable bladder. The bladder fills with water and seals such that water only flows one way. Look in the plumbing section.


0

You should not add an upward bend to the pipe, as that will more likely lead to water always sitting in the pipe. Instead you should add a check valve (one way valve) to the line. This will allow the pump to push water out, while preventing ditch water from flowing back in. If the pump is strong enough, it should be able to push water into the ditch even ...


0

Another solution -- the one used in my house for both the condensing furnace and the dehumidifier -- is to run the drainage into what amounts to a small sump pump, so the water can be sent through a hose up to ceiling level, across the room, and then down into the drain.


0

If the rise on the pump is enough for the additional height of the J, I would think it would be enough to pump despite back-pressure from whatever water is in the ditch... but I may be wrong about that. So you might need a more powerful pump even with the extension. This sounds to me like the first step should be to make sure the property is graded so water ...


1

I'm imagining it's only a 1/2" pipe, in which case maybe an on-floor cord protector might work: http://www.homedepot.com/p/Legrand-Wiremold-5-ft-Over-Floor-Cord-Protector-CDBK-5/100669770 Or you could re-route the pipe around the perimeter of the room to avoid the heaviest traffic.


1

Since water finds its own level, even a 1 degree slope will allow water to run, but it is generally better to to steep your roof 15-30 degrees for efficient running of water to avoid soaking and leaking in the roof.



Top 50 recent answers are included