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The photos posted above were really helpful, since many people may not know what connectors and adapters are available -- as I didn't before replacing two vanities. Therefore, I thought I'd post photos of what I did and the components I used. The first thing to do is come out of the wall with a wall tube (otherwise known as a quarter-bend wall tube). Cut ...


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Look at a typical "dry well" install - basically terminate the pipe into a blob of crushed rock, or an actual void/hole/tube punched full of holes, so the water can filter out. Just stopping the pipe underground will not work well. In an essentially non-freezing climate there should be little problem with this - they can be done well in freezing climates, ...


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For the record, there ARE different threads. I just bought a new flange (only one type was available for sale in my neighbourhood) which did match the thread count on the existing drain shoe. Particularly annoying in that I was unable to purchase a new drain shoe. Actually, the drain shoe is what I was really trying to purchase as the existing one had ...


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Here is a suggestion for investigation. Start by removing the perforated sewer-cleanout and temporarily capping the suspect drain with a size reducing fitting. Then try one or more of the methods in this answer to a similar question.


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Floor drains should have a grate. Placing your drain pipe so that it pours through the grate will protect your floor drain but the grate will eventually clog. Make sure you can see and remove any gunk buildup. Regardless of your floor drain's capacity (to handle the flow rate from your sink, tub or whatever), consider placing a ball valve in the piping ...


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I used WD-40 but not usual stuff. Found penetrating WD-40 at home depot. Also got a plastic hair clog tool. Sprayed down pipe, let it sit for 15-20 minutes, stuck clog tool down, jiggled it around and viola...able to pull out stopper (lucky it hadn't broken off).


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The drain will unscrew... you might need a drain key (or expanding tub drain remover). Here's a video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T_0vYme1Q88 Or you might be able to grab it with a pair of channel locks: But if you don't care about it any more then you could use a dremel tool to cut a notch in it so that you can use a flat head screwdriver and a ...


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Use a vacuum that has a wand or a shopvac.


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That is commonly called a kitchen sink strainer or basket strainer. You should start by soaking the parts that you can see in the picture with a penetrating spray lube, the kind that says "helps loosen rusted parts". You will need to disconnect the plumbing from the strainer by removing both the metal and the plastic slip-joint nuts. Then remove the ...



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