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That is commonly called a kitchen sink strainer or basket strainer. You should start by soaking the parts that you can see in the picture with a penetrating spray lube, the kind that says "helps loosen rusted parts". You will need to disconnect the plumbing from the strainer by removing both the metal and the plastic slip-joint nuts. Then remove the ...


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Remove as much of the rust as you can using any of various mechanical methods, then treat it with a chemical rust converter. The rust converter will treat the iron oxides to help prevent future corrosion and will also leave a protective water resistant coating. Try to spread the converter to overlap onto sound areas, and maybe try to use a cotton swab to ...


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If you wish to actually de-rust the tub, you have a few options, most of which are slightly destructive, to remove the rust. Wire wheels or other powered grinding/sanding devices will be quickest, but remove the most material. Hand sanding/abrading will remove less material and may allow you to shape your result more easily. Using an abrasive cleaning ...


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I believe that you lost a (retaining) screw. It might have fallen down the drain... hopefully it's lodged in the p-trap. This is similar to: How to replace my kitchen sink basket with no lock nut?


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in homes with lots of women, or men with long hair, this is a constant battle. the only way to prevent this is to put a hair catcher over your drain, but these are a nusiance. primarily the problem comes from hairs getting stuck at some bend or sticky area in a pipe, and this acts as a scaffold for more hairs to accrete and so on and so on. if you ...


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If you have an air compressor you can plumb in a connector for an air line after the shuttoff valve for the line. Then leave the faucet open at the end of the line and connect the air compressor with a pressurized tank. This will blow out the line and prevent freezing. Good luck!


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The guy who plumbed this probably goes out for beer with the guy who plumbed our double-wide. :) I learned the hard way, by repairing previous work here, that you can't have too many vents. Where to put them though? Your drop from the tub to the P doesn't have a lot of space. I can also appreciate not running horizontal below the "flood level." So, I'd ...


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yes you do. even if you drain it, its going to get water lying in low spots. that will rupture the line if it freezes. just make sure you slope it 1" in 4 ft to where you are going to drain it. that way it will have no water in it come freeze up. you can just mount it with stood off pex clamps


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The water in the wash tub will drain out if the drain in the wall is lower than the water level in the washing machine. Simple physics, water seeks its own level. The drain located at the recommended height will allow the water to remain and allow the pump to remove the water at the end of the cycle.



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