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4

No, you should not do that. As mentioned in a comment, the drain is going to fill up with gunk and clog. Depending on use, you'll find that you have to snake this line quite often. While traps do hold water, they are limited in the depth of water they can hold. Traps are also designed in such a way, that normal use stirs up any "sediment" and helps flush ...


-3

yes, it would be like a p trap that is always full of water. Risky because of the joints there.


0

Or, don't vent externally at all. In many jurisdictions you have the option of an AAV - Air Admittance Valve, readily installed in a wall box behind the washer. An AAV involves a gravity seal that opens just when needed to let fresh air into the plumbing pipe. Just makes sure what you get is a real AAV, not just a cheap $3 check valve. They're ...


-1

It may seem unconventional, but given that it looks like it is leaking at the pipe joint down below the top of the concrete, my first suggestion would be to clean everything up and use several packages of JB Weld putty all around the leaking joint. I personally would then fill the hole in with grout, but that would only be after verifying the leak was ...


3

For drain covers with no screw holes and no option of screwing in itself we usually slap some plumber's putty on the bottom and smash it in. With a screwdriver and a few tugs you can remove and reuse again but should keep it from moving.


2

It is a good idea not to glue or make the grate non-removable in case access to the drain is needed in the future. For a fast non-adhesive fix to keep the grate in-place wrap a rubber band around the grates edge.


2

The impeller is the main part of the pump. The pump makes the water spray and it also pumps the water out after the wash or rinse cycle has finished. Usually the drain solenoid opens and since the pump is running all the water goes out the drain instead of through the sprayers. It doesn't drain by gravity since it pumps up to the sink tailpiece or other ...


2

When I needed to replace the drain in my shower I was told to use this drain removal tool: If that tool would work, there will be four cross bars in the bottom of the drain that the tool grips when inserted. You take a screw driver or other rod and slip it through the holes on the side of tool to then turn it and remove the drain. If the tool doesn't ...


2

GE dishwasher won’t drain. Washer is washing, but doesn’t drain. During drain cycle you hear a hum, but no water is flowing into the garbage disposal. Troubleshooting: Two common problems: 1. Drain hose is blocked at the garbage disposal or anti-siphon air gap connection. 2. Something is stuck in the drain pump so that the impeller blades can't turn. ...


1

I had the problem here in NE Ohio. Had the ancient furnace replaced with a energy efficient one. The guys installed it, took the old drain line and reconnected my new furnace to it. The frigid cold weather arrived and bingo, came home to a wet carpet and the condensation pump screaming up a storm. I do not have a drain next to the furnace. Well, I called ...


2

Yes, you can plumb the outlet of the condensate pump into the tailpiece of the shower. Assuming the condensate line is properly trapped, then there should be no problem. You'll notice in the code snippet below, that it says "If discharged into the drainage system, equipment shall drain by means of an indirect waste pipe.". Which means you cannot, plumb the ...


0

These get blocked by hair and soap buildup all the time there was probably some scum on it when you removed it (now matter how clean the tub is). An old wire coat hanger can be used to scrape around and pull the remaining soap/hair out. Or the purchase of a small hand auger and slide it in and rotate to clean. I really don’t like drain cleaners in these ...


1

It's an electrical outlet cover. We had them at one of my previous places of employment. We actually had two separate sets of them offset by a few feet under the floor of office space. The second set was for our computer networks. The center plug is to keep debris out of any outlets not in use.


3

My bet would be on it being a receptacle. Typically floor boxes like this are installed raised up a little, so as to accommodate carpet or other flooring. I would also bet on it being a single outlet. Most likely the center cap is covering the outlet and the outer screws are there to hold everything on. Since we can see a shadow from the center box, I'd ...


2

It's hard to say, but looks like an outlet to me. It should be safe to use an appropriately sized philips driver to open the plug in the middle and look inside. (It looks large. Don't strip it with a small driver.)


2

I don't think there's a code imposed minimum, but there's likely a physical limitation based on available fittings. Between the disposal outlet and the drain, there must be a trap. The bottom of the disposal outlet, must be above the trap weir (the point in the trap at which water starts to drain from the trap). Therefore, in theory the bottom of the ...


0

I'm not aware of a code requirement other than that the connection would have to take place above the trap seal (the portion of the trap that holds water). Therefore installing a sanitary tee on top of the p-trap would be acceptable. There is a maximum developed length of 1200mm (3'-11") for the fixture outlet pipe (from sink or disposal to p-trap). Note: ...


2

As far as the international plumbing code is concerned (relevant section is here), you're fine putting it pretty much anywhere that meets the distance requirements. In fact, the only mention of accessibility is in mental health facilities where traps are required to be inaccessible. This is really no different than pouring concrete over the trap in a floor ...


2

WARNING: I have not searched through plumbing codes, so this answer could be completely wrong. I think it's recommend to have an accessible trap, but I don't think it's code required. Traps for tubs and showers are often not accessible, so I don't think there's a code section that specifically disallows hidden traps. However, if you do put a trap in ...


0

I'd be inclined to disassemble everything above the concrete and find out whether that lower joint is even glued properly. It's not outside the realm of possibility that it was simply missed. Even if it was glued, you may be able to clean/buff the exposed pipe enough to get a good cement bond to a new wye fitting. It's worth a try before you drag out the ...



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