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30

There is a very simple answer to your question. Your dishwasher is draining into the side drain adapter on your garbage disposer. this was a common practice for many years. All the water draining from your dishwasher is being pumped into the upper basin side of the disposer. Solids from the dishwasher are blocking the drain in the disposer, so when you turn ...


17

When drain water from one fixture comes back out another fixture, it means your blockage is beyond the point where those drains meet. You need to get a good look at the topology of your waste plumbing, to get some ideas about where the blockage is. Clothes washer -> bathtub is a common symptom, because the clothes washer drains a lot of water up high (it ...


15

I'll echo the comment and say that you should make sure you have a proper P-trap installed under the sink. This trap holds water and provides a seal against sewer gases getting up into the bathroom. Without one, gases will leak in constantly, and will be displaced by water down the drain which can force the gases up into the bathroom even if normally it's ...


13

Most towns/cities will not be too happy with you, if you start cutting up their road. So you'll have to use a method that will be completely on your property. Dump some dirt The easiest solution would be to build up the area with a load of dirt. Using a wheelbarrow and a shovel, grab some dirt from another location in your yard. If you can't find a place ...


11

Does it smell when you turn on the tap and catch the water in a bowl (so it doesn't go down the drain)? If so, it's something in the faucet. Take off the aerator cap and look for gunk inside, and/or look in the barrel of the faucet if you can to clean it out. You can also consider replacing the faucet. (I am assuming that since this only affects the ...


10

This might be of interest. Air gap Many local building codes require a dishwasher to connect to an air gap before the connection to a garbage disposer. This keeps wastewater from backing up into the appliance. You must purchase the air gap separately. Mount in on top or next to the sink. Connect one flexible hose to the drain of the ...


9

It sounds to me like you don't have two unconnected drain lines, you have ONE drain line that starts at the fridge and ends at the sink. If you stopper the sink end its just going to fill up the drain line and back up into the filter. You need to install a tie in for the 3/8" line under the sink before the trap. Do not hook it in to the main drain after ...


9

Your tub has an overflow drain. You just have to find it. Remove the two screws next to the combination drain toggle & overflow plate. Now gently pull up to reveal the overflow hole and the drain plug: Get out your snake (you've got a snake, right?) and thread it down the newly revealed hole. Also remove the single screw holding the drain screen. ...


8

As long as the p-trap is lower than the drainage from the basin then you can install it. It can also be lower than your exit pipe you need to drain into You attach the p-trap directly to the drainage and manuever the p-traps exits into you existing drain. It is not ideal to have the p-trap below the the exit drain because water gravity has to force the ...


8

Most commercial-grade ice makers don't maintain freezing temperatures in the actual ice bin; the ice itself keeps the temperature cold in the bin, and the refrigerator coil then only has to freeze the ice tray. This strategy has several advantages: The "cold" side of the refrigeration coil can be placed inside the bin, right against the tray, so it makes ...


7

A 1 1/4" female FIP adapter worked perfectly. As soon as I saw it, I was embarassed for not having thought of it earlier. I used some teflon tape, screwed the FIP adapter onto the adapter coming out of the wall, then just glued my 1 1/4" pipe directly into it. No reduction in pipe sizes, and 100% ABS parts.


7

I stay away from chemical solutions all together. I have had reasonably good luck with using a drain snare to snag most of the hair in my tub drain. Every few months, I will shoot one down the drain if I see it getting a little slow. This will normally clear things up without any further intervention. When that fails, I usually move towards using a hand ...


7

You must have a vent above the vertical run for these drains. As drawn, water from your new work cannot draw air behind it from your existing work. This is what vents do: draw air in behind draining water. You could functionally combine all the new work drains as drawn into a single vertical vent, but remember that it needs to be able to draw air from ...


7

You could dig a dry well, which is a pit for water to collect and soak away through. At the same time, you will raise the grade which will further help reduce the problem. Simply dig the area out to a depth of a foot or two, dump in six inches to a foot of gravel, then re-cover with soil, and have your final grade end up about six inches higher than ...


6

It sure sounds like you have an obstruction beyond the trap. You're right in that the liquid drain cleaners are not real effective on this kind of blockage. If you cannot run a snake through the trap and beyond, some disassembly of the drain system my be necessary to reach the problem area. This is not the way all plumbing drains work, they are suppose to ...


6

IANAP (I Am Not A Plumber) but I have recently replaced my old cast iron stack. The relevant part of the International Plumbing Code looks like section 904. Specifically the following sections may apply to you. 904.1 Roof extension. All open vent pipes that extend through a roof shall be terminated at least [NUMBER] inches (mm) above the roof, except ...


6

Hair going down the drain is inevitable and no solution will completely prevent it. Some drains can be replaced from above while others cannot. Unless you are having a chronic problem with clogging due to hair, I think you are making more work for yourself than necessary. If you try to remove it and can't, or don't install the new one correctly you'll go ...


6

If its on a solid slab you're looking at a jackhammer and some new fittings. If your fittings are cast iron you'll need to be especially careful because its brittle and any concrete removing action around it could cause it to crack. Once exposed you'll be able to see your options depending on which direction the down elbow runs.


6

Sounds like the drain after the disposal and connection to the other sink is partially blocked. I'd start with a drain cleaner that's designed for a partial blockage. In the kitchen, it's likely a buildup from cooking oils and grease that got into the drain. If that doesn't work, then you can remove the trap under your sink and remove as much crud from it as ...


6

That isn't how gravity works. Drains like sinks are typically gravity drains where the water is drawn down into the drainpipe... by gravity. This is in contrast to things like washing-machines where the wastewater is pumped out into standpipes. In order to drain your sink via a standpipe above the fixture you'll need a drain pump or drain into a sump and ...


5

There is a vent that can be mounted to a pipe going about half way up a wall. In my basement, I have one on the backside of a wall (on an unfinished side). It has a check valve to prevent smells from the sewer pipes from getting into the room. You could put it in a box on the wall of your garage and cover it if desired with something that looks like a ...


5

Sounds like you have a clog in the drain system downstream of your bathroom, or an obstruction in your drain vents, or both. A drain clog would obviously slow down drainage. The bubbling and interaction between your toilet and shower drains suggests that they may not be getting proper ventilation, and therefore sucking air from one fixture to the other. Do ...


5

There is a clog downstream from both of these drains. If they are both at the lowest level of the house and you have a septic system, then it's conceivable that the problem is there, but you'd also see water backing up into that bathroom when you run any other showers/toilets in the house. Most likely, the clog is in the joint in the drain lines where the ...


5

Tim Carter at AskTheBuilder.com has a lot of articles on French/Trench drains. He likes solid pipe and I agree. You are correct in that the holes point DOWN. Here's why - the water won't magicially find the holes if they are pointed up, but if they are down, the water can fill the trench and then flow into the pipe. Put a cleanout on the upper end if you ...


5

It looks like you might be able to do this pretty easily. To remove the stopper, simply unscrew the top of the handle of the drain stopper, then unscrew the underlying screw in the shaft to pull out the drain cover completely. Then, you'll have the cradle-thing that holds the stopper. You might be able to leave that in place (I grew up in a house that had ...


5

Sounds like a bad O-Ring on the stopper. Here is a good picture for reference. To remove the stopper, you'll have to remove the retaining nut at the back of the drain body. Once that's removed you'll pull the pivot rod out, this will allow you to remove the stopper. Now that you have the stopper out, visually inspect the rubber gasket around the ...


5

As the comments suggested, first try and grab it with your hands. If it's passed the point you can reach, you will likely need to use a Toilet Auger to dislodge it. Tooth brushes tend to be problematic because of their shape relative to the trap in the toilet - they can really get wedged in there! Worst case scenario it might not be removable.


5

I would like to clarify a few things regarding this question and the provided answers. As others have stated, you will definitely need to provide additional venting for the fixtures within this new addition, the existing vent will not suffice. Others have recommended providing individual vents for each fixture and then combining them in the ceiling to one ...


5

The cover for the bath plug includes the overflow drain. The bottom has an opening that is your overflow drain. If you remove the cover of the over flow to snake it, exercise care not to drop any parts down either drain. And be gentle with the snake so that you don't damage the drain plug assembly. If you use the plungers, remember that you're trying to ...



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