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The issue is not 'what is in favor' but what the building code requires. Here is a general rule: toilet: 3" or 4" washing machine and shower: 2" sinks: 1 1/2" nothing smaller. combined vent through roof must be equal or greater than size leaving the home to sewer or septic. This is just a guideline - I take it you are not hiring a plumber to do this work. ...


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the easiest way to repair a damaged cast-iron pipe is with a rubber connector that has two worm drive hose clamps at each end. They come in all types of configurations and diameters. Lasco is a quality brand name as is Fernco. If the break is in the pipe you will have to cut out the damaged section and replace with a similar sized ABS pipe with a rubber ...


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Find a better store, if the ones you are going to don't have 2" PVC in full sticks (or possibly look higher up in the store you are in, and get someone to drag it down.) In MY house, the only place you'll find 1-1/2 or 1-1/4" is the tailpieces on the sinks - as soon as it hits pipe, it goes up to 2", because it's not that much more expensive and it greatly ...


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You will need a P-Trap. If you look at the inside of a toilet, it won't have a P-Trap inside, but it is built in such a way that gas cannot vent into the air. It sounds to me like your issue is because of a small shower drain-line connected to your shower. To fix this, you should use a larger size pipe for your P-trap that won't get clogged. Please ...


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You need the trap, for precisely the reason you guessed. Toilets have the trap built into the toilet itself. What you could do is get a strainer made to fit under the plug - often used in kitchen sinks. They are easy to find at most home stores or even dollar stores. That will stop any big stuff from going down the drain, and give you a chance to pull it ...


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In this case, it doesn't look like you need the vent loop at all, and the 6" height requirement is well-covered by the vent stack going clear up to the roof. If you want to put that loop in, it definitely isn't going to hurt anything. It just doesn't look like you need it. You could branch off the vent stack above the junction and use a flatter slope to ...


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Depends on where you live. In my area, AFAIK you can vent as many things as you want through a 4" pipe, and it must be 4" or greater in diameter. Even if your codes allow 3" stacks, I suggest using 4".


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This has been an ongoing problem in the bathroom sink we use the most. When I was using conventional solutions (Drano and the like) to unclog it, I just assumed that there was a bunch of hair in the drain. This was a problem every couple of weeks, though, and I hated spending so much money on toxic drain cleaners. A couple of years ago, I happened across a ...



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