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17

When drain water from one fixture comes back out another fixture, it means your blockage is beyond the point where those drains meet. You need to get a good look at the topology of your waste plumbing, to get some ideas about where the blockage is. Clothes washer -> bathtub is a common symptom, because the clothes washer drains a lot of water up high (it ...


16

You have two big issues here. First is that you have a serious risk of venting sewer gasses into your home. This is why drain vents open above the roof line or use one-way air admittance valves. This is likely to be unpleasant and possibly unhealthy. Second is that a drain vent is typically too small and too moist to properly vent a bathroom fan. Your fan ...


11

Removing the old pipe First you want to make sure the section of pipe that will remain, is properly supported (you don't want it falling). Then you'll want to install some temporary supports, to catch the portion of the pipe that you'll be removing. Use a chain cutter, hammer and cold chisel, or grinder to break the pipe a few inches before the hub on the ...


10

You are correct that floor drains do need to be monitored and occasionally the trap refilled with water. So the first thing to check is that your floor drain actually has a trap. The way to do that is to slowly pour water in to the drain. You should notice the water level rise and stay there. If the water disappears quickly then it's likely you don't have a ...


10

This might not be the answer, but for reference here is a problem that can occur if the plumbing is not installed properly. If you look at Fig. 3, this is what a proper drain looks like. You'll notice the orange line represents the water level in the system, the water levels out in the trap preventing sewer gases from entering the sink drain. In Fig. 1, ...


10

No problem, as long as the vent meets the criteria listed below. Not directly below a door, openable window, or other air intake opening (of this or any other building). Not within 10 feet horizontally of the above mentioned openings, unless it's 3 feet above them. Not less than 10 feet from the property line. Not less than 10 feet above the ground. Not ...


9

You have an "S" trap because the drain exits through the floor and is probably unvented. A "P" trap is for a drain in the wall that is teed for a vent stack. The major disadvantage comes because "S" traps are usually used in locations where they are either not vented or poorly vented on the outflow side and so can siphon off the water in the trap, leading ...


9

It sounds to me like you don't have two unconnected drain lines, you have ONE drain line that starts at the fridge and ends at the sink. If you stopper the sink end its just going to fill up the drain line and back up into the filter. You need to install a tie in for the 3/8" line under the sink before the trap. Do not hook it in to the main drain after ...


7

A 1 1/4" female FIP adapter worked perfectly. As soon as I saw it, I was embarassed for not having thought of it earlier. I used some teflon tape, screwed the FIP adapter onto the adapter coming out of the wall, then just glued my 1 1/4" pipe directly into it. No reduction in pipe sizes, and 100% ABS parts.


7

Of course they can as long as you have proper drainage angle and double venting and traps. If this is an installation of a new fixture, you need a permit and a master plumber to sign for the permit. Get a plumber and do it right. Just asking the question tells me you don't know what to do and could get into trouble. Saving a few bucks and doing it wrong ...


7

For cutting the pipe, go rent a chain pipe cutter (aka soil pipe cutter). It will make short work of the pipe and not be too messy. It will make a clean enough edge that a Fernco coupling (like you have a picture of) will work fine. Obviously you will need to add some strapping to secure the horizontal run of iron pipe if you go this route because you ...


7

Remove the trap from the tailpiece of the wash bowl and see if it needs cleaning. Check your main vent stack that goes through the roof for any obstructions. Verify that a bird has not made a nest there. If the sink was not installed by a plumber and has always had this problem, an air vent pipe may not have been installed or was installed incorrectly.


7

You're going to have to cut out the pipe, and replace it with PVC drain pipe. You can get rubber connectors (fernco) for the transition. Here's a youtube how-to: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EFaJyIzyiYA


7

No, there should not ever be two traps on a single drain line. The point of the trap is to create a water barrier which prevents sewer gasses from coming up the empty pipe and into the house. When you have two traps on the same line, you end up creating a kind of vapor block in the line which prevents it from draining properly. What do you do? Get ...


7

You must have a vent above the vertical run for these drains. As drawn, water from your new work cannot draw air behind it from your existing work. This is what vents do: draw air in behind draining water. You could functionally combine all the new work drains as drawn into a single vertical vent, but remember that it needs to be able to draw air from ...


7

Another option would be to cut the pipe above and below the cleanout, and install a PVC Y-fitting with a cleanout cap using no-hub couplings like these: I would think that drilling and/or sawing out the old cast iron cap is going to be a giant pain in the rear, and will be likely to damage the cleanout fitting to the point where it needs to be replaced ...


7

Take a straw. Suck up some liquid, and put your finger over the top. Notice how the liquid doesn't fall out the bottom of the straw. That's a vacuum lock, and it is one of the reasons why you need to vent your drains. Poorly vented drains don't drain well, and you'll get clicking and bubbling. Your toilet may fail to clear the payload. So regardless ...


6

It sounds like the toilet, shower and sink share a vent. This is pretty normal; no plumber in his right mind would run separate vented stacks for each drain in the house. The drains are instead tied into one vent stack, and then stacks are combined as they flow into the main sanitary drain. However, the shower or sink may be upstream of the toilet, and are ...


6

IANAP (I Am Not A Plumber) but I have recently replaced my old cast iron stack. The relevant part of the International Plumbing Code looks like section 904. Specifically the following sections may apply to you. 904.1 Roof extension. All open vent pipes that extend through a roof shall be terminated at least [NUMBER] inches (mm) above the roof, except ...


6

Why is it rotten? Does it bode ill for the rest of the system? I would replace as much cast as is easily doable with ABS. I would cut above and below where the K sink drain comes in and replace everything back to the sink with ABS. Is there a particularly good sawzall blade for this? Standard metal blade will do - I just cut a 4" myself no ...


6

If its on a solid slab you're looking at a jackhammer and some new fittings. If your fittings are cast iron you'll need to be especially careful because its brittle and any concrete removing action around it could cause it to crack. Once exposed you'll be able to see your options depending on which direction the down elbow runs.


6

It sure sounds like you have an obstruction beyond the trap. You're right in that the liquid drain cleaners are not real effective on this kind of blockage. If you cannot run a snake through the trap and beyond, some disassembly of the drain system my be necessary to reach the problem area. This is not the way all plumbing drains work, they are suppose to ...


5

Seems to me that the issue is the pipe enters the wall so low that the J-trap won't reach (and would hit the shelf)? Looks like you are going to need to get two elbows, or a 180 and bring the wall fitting up higher to meet your J: It will snake around a lot, but I don't think there's anything wrong with doing that. BTW, since it's visible, I'd suggest ...


5

All traps need venting in all cases. Without a vent, the water seal in the trap gets sucked out and sewer gases can enter the room. There's also all sorts of examples where someone thought they were providing venting, but done in such a way that clearing the water seal was still a possibility. Some of these methods even used to be accepted practice, such as ...


5

Yes, they will both be using the same drain pipe at somepoint inside or outside of your house. But the the pipes must join well below the level of both items or the pipe must be large enough for the combined flow, otherwise when you put water down one of them, it will flow out of the other!


5

85 years old. The biggest problem is that cast iron is heavy. By removing a section of the piping you might end up inadvertently messing up the mounts for the old pipe. If it is at all possible I would replace it with PVC, otherwise, I would leave it alone.


5

You likely have a partial blockage down the line from these two drains, or maybe where the two lines are joined. First thing to try would be a long snake to see if you can clear the line from either of your drains.


5

I would like to clarify a few things regarding this question and the provided answers. As others have stated, you will definitely need to provide additional venting for the fixtures within this new addition, the existing vent will not suffice. Others have recommended providing individual vents for each fixture and then combining them in the ceiling to one ...


5

You can purchase a toilet flange repair at any big box hardware store. Remove the wax ring (buy a new one), remove the bolts, and mount this on top of the existing broken flange: Then reattach the toilet as per normal, making sure not to over tighten. Tip, seat the toilet firmly on the wax ring before you tighten the bolts, and use a STANDARD sized wax ...



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