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34

You don't have a trap seal, to prevent air from moving through the drain. Only the dishwasher is draining through the trap, so there's no trap to prevent air from coming up the drain. you'll have to fix the plumbing, so that both the sink and dishwasher use the trap. Instead, the plumbing should look more like this... Use a tailpiece like this, off ...


8

Wait a minute... that may be a very, very bad idea. sorry kacalapy. All I can see is messy carpet after that try. If this carpet is laid on concrete, then the tack strip is fastened with masonry nails, and if installed properly is chiseled over the edge. No way caulking is going to seal the gaps causing the air leaks. If your leaks are that bad, then do ...


5

I think your third idea will work and look the best. First fill the void with expanding foam, allow the foam to cure, then cut it off flush with the face of the existing door trim. Then cover the area with whatever molding/trim you find most aesthetically pleasing. You may wish to miter or cope the corners to get a more finished appearance.


5

You can have a blower-door test done (or rent a blower and do it yourself). Basically you close all your doors/windows, and then stick a big fan in your doorway (sealed), then have it blow air outside. It creates negative pressure inside your house, amplifying any air leaks. I had this done as part of an energy audit (and when it was fairly cold outside), ...


5

If the gap isn't too big, regular caulk will seal the gap between it and the wall. If you're using it at the top of the baseboard and can get it in the same color as the baseboard, you might not even have to paint it.


5

You could put a cover over the drain box but when you do so it has to allow for free air flow so the isolation afforded by that air gap drain box still functions properly. If I was making the cover it would have a baffle design with a double wall construction. See figure below: The inner wall of the baffle cover would sit on the ground or maybe even set ...


4

You can just cover the window with a heat shrinkable window insulation kit such as this one below available at any home store. It will come with the needed tape to affix it to the window frame (from the inside of the apartment) and then all you need is a hair dryer to tighten it up to a nice clean and clear view. Once summer comes again, it will easily ...


3

For the bottom, you need to install a (or replace the existing) door bottom (Yeah, someone was really inventive with that name). The thing goes on the bottom of the door and will fill the gap there. There are 2 general types, ones with vinyl fins (like this) or ones with short brushes (like this). I personally find the latter work better, though if you ...


3

If you can't feel a leak then there probably isn't one, at least not there. It could be that your loft hatch (attic door for the US crowd) is leaking a load of heat. Is the door itself cold? Loft hatches are typically made of very thin wood, which doesn't have much in the way of insulating properties. I've always found it helps to pull a layer of insulation ...


2

Start by removing the trim from around the window, this will give you a good look at the problem. Once you have the trim removed you'll be looking at something similar to this... You may notice gaps between the window frame and the wood frame or between the wood frame and the wall, these are the areas you'll want to fill to stop the draft. Get a can ...


2

Look at this question which covers similar grounds. But the short answer is the sealing plastic film that you can get at pretty much any hardware store will do the trick. It's cheap, effective, and removes easily when you're done with it.


2

This could also be caused by bad/torn/loose ductwork in the attic area. I would check the return ductwork in the attic for tears and/or breaks.


2

The air in your duct work is cold because it is running through the attic which is not heated. There will be some air flow through the ducts because they are not a "sealed container" they are designed to move the air in your home. As for the DIY project if your covers are metal I would suggest using a magnetic tape or adhesive sheets to attach them. Or ...


2

Similar to @BMitch's answer, I used a magnetic cover to cover the vent below my fireplace. We found this was the primary cool air leak for our fireplace and I bet it is yours too. It works great, and is very simple to remove before starting a fire. Since it is black like the fireplace, it is not even noticed. I bought one from this site selling the exact ...


2

If the worst part of the draft is coming from the vents above and below your insert, you can block the draft with some magnetic vent covers: Test the your insert first with a magnet to make sure these covers will stick.


2

You may have solved this already but an alternative is a Chimney Balloon. It is easy to install, and you don't see it. If you accidentally leave it in then it will melt and deflate and is not going to go ablaze in the fireplace. You'll need to pick the correct size though,


2

If you caulked it and there's still a leak, you didn't caulk the whole gap. Air isn't going to come through silicone caulk. For such a small gap, expanding foam is overkill and may do more harm than good if it expands too much and widens the gap, which could cause the window to start sticking. Another possibility is that there are additional gaps and holes ...


2

Condensation appears to be on the inside of the window. After 10 years, the seals have failed. They are no longer "gas-filled" - they just have air in there, and the air in there has water in it, which condensed when they are cold. The only way to fix this is to replace the double-pane unit. It's remotely possible that if your window manufacturer was ...


2

What you are looking for is duct seal. You can pick it up at most home centers. This will seal the external conduit, where the power line enters the house. For sealing the studs, you could get a can of insulating foam (Great Stuff or another brand). The Firestop type would be your best bet. Any place wires penetrate your siding, you should seal them with ...


2

Most drains (in the US) vent thru a vertical pipe which prevents sewer gas from accumulating in the structure (home,apartment,etc) Part of that system should include a trap (usually a J or S shaped piece of pipe which holds a small quantity of water which prevent air or gasses from passing back into the room from the sink or toilet. If that trap was not ...


2

While I agree that this was assembled backwards I think the apparent lack of a vent is acceptable here. It looks like it basically goes through the wall and then into that box outside--so long as it's close enough to the sink that would suffice for venting.


1

That should work, provided the wife approves of the appearance. The face of the fireplace shouldn't get hot enough to burn your hand, otherwise it'd be a safety hazard. The tape should do just fine. Is the chimney damper closed?


1

For a temporary, low-cost, low-hassle solution, you could just put a towel down in front of the door to block the draft. That's what we always did in my house as a kid.


1

Convection in a stairway, in a reasonably tight house, is way overrated. Given the square footage of wall and ceiling space - I do not see how the stairway makes much difference. I run a fan 24/7 at the bottom of my stairs, adjust vents to the seasons, and still can not seem to get my system to play nice. I do have a single zone forced air, so it is not a ...


1

If the product your talking about is GreatStuff (which it sounds like it is), you'll want to use the window and door variety instead. The gap and crack formula expands too much, whereas the window and door stuff doesn't expand as much.


1

I have this fireplace cover, but I find that it only helps so much. I am thinking of building a supplemental heat barrier, with the following layers (from closest to furthest from fire): radiant foil barrier fiberglass insulation (no vapor retardants) plywood I would cut the fiberglass to the size of the plywood, then take a slightly larger piece of foil ...


1

I can't tell from the picture but it seems likely that the floor beneath the middle of the sill is sagging or just lower than the ends of the sill for whatever reason. If that is the case, and it were me, I'd pull up the existing sill and shim up the area that is too low. Set a straight edge across the width of the door frame to see how much material needs ...


1

I have used bondo successfully for several such repairs, with a foam backing. You can get minwax wood filler but bondo will work just as well. You can paint to match after applying.


1

Air is penetrating the walls and getting into the ductwork, or there's a gap in your heat exchanger which is potentially deadly.



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