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7

Wait a minute... that may be a very, very bad idea. sorry kacalapy. All I can see is messy carpet after that try. If this carpet is laid on concrete, then the tack strip is fastened with masonry nails, and if installed properly is chiseled over the edge. No way caulking is going to seal the gaps causing the air leaks. If your leaks are that bad, then do ...


5

I think your third idea will work and look the best. First fill the void with expanding foam, allow the foam to cure, then cut it off flush with the face of the existing door trim. Then cover the area with whatever molding/trim you find most aesthetically pleasing. You may wish to miter or cope the corners to get a more finished appearance.


5

You can have a blower-door test done (or rent a blower and do it yourself). Basically you close all your doors/windows, and then stick a big fan in your doorway (sealed), then have it blow air outside. It creates negative pressure inside your house, amplifying any air leaks. I had this done as part of an energy audit (and when it was fairly cold outside), ...


4

You can just cover the window with a heat shrinkable window insulation kit such as this one below available at any home store. It will come with the needed tape to affix it to the window frame (from the inside of the apartment) and then all you need is a hair dryer to tighten it up to a nice clean and clear view. Once summer comes again, it will easily ...


3

If you can't feel a leak then there probably isn't one, at least not there. It could be that your loft hatch (attic door for the US crowd) is leaking a load of heat. Is the door itself cold? Loft hatches are typically made of very thin wood, which doesn't have much in the way of insulating properties. I've always found it helps to pull a layer of insulation ...


2

Look at this question which covers similar grounds. But the short answer is the sealing plastic film that you can get at pretty much any hardware store will do the trick. It's cheap, effective, and removes easily when you're done with it.


2

Start by removing the trim from around the window, this will give you a good look at the problem. Once you have the trim removed you'll be looking at something similar to this... You may notice gaps between the window frame and the wood frame or between the wood frame and the wall, these are the areas you'll want to fill to stop the draft. Get a can ...


2

The air in your duct work is cold because it is running through the attic which is not heated. There will be some air flow through the ducts because they are not a "sealed container" they are designed to move the air in your home. As for the DIY project if your covers are metal I would suggest using a magnetic tape or adhesive sheets to attach them. Or ...


2

For the bottom, you need to install a (or replace the existing) door bottom (Yeah, someone was really inventive with that name). The thing goes on the bottom of the door and will fill the gap there. There are 2 general types, ones with vinyl fins (like this) or ones with short brushes (like this). I personally find the latter work better, though if you ...


2

Similar to @BMitch's answer, I used a magnetic cover to cover the vent below my fireplace. We found this was the primary cool air leak for our fireplace and I bet it is yours too. It works great, and is very simple to remove before starting a fire. Since it is black like the fireplace, it is not even noticed. I bought one from this site selling the exact ...


2

If the worst part of the draft is coming from the vents above and below your insert, you can block the draft with some magnetic vent covers: Test the your insert first with a magnet to make sure these covers will stick.


1

You may have solved this already but an alternative is a Chimney Balloon. It is easy to install, and you don't see it. If you accidentally leave it in then it will melt and deflate and is not going to go ablaze in the fireplace. You'll need to pick the correct size though,


1

You can get a under the door dual draft stopper that slides under the door like this below. This may work as a temporary fix seeing as your in a rental http://www.improvementscatalog.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/twin-draft-guard-26-23174-door-draft-stopper/10784?redirect=y


1

It sounds like you want to create a firm seal around the hatch. I would start with something like adhesive foam tape or strip gasket tape. See if you can measure the depth of any present gaps, and try to get a tape thick enough to compensate for that. (If that doesn't do the trick, posting pictures of the hatch from different angles will help a lot.)


1

I've seen solutions that go over top of the drop down-stairs. You can find them by searching for 'attic stair insulation kit'. If you were to go completely home-made, you can get sheets of rigid styrofoam, then make a box that you can drop over the hole before you put the stairs back up. If the floor is flat and smooth, that might be enough on its own, ...


1

Are you sure the air is coming from the return vent ductwork itself? It's not coming from the edges of the vent where the ductwork is attached to the vent? I would hypothesize that on windy days, your attic is becoming pressurized by air entering via soffit vents or roof vents that are on the windy side of the house. Air would need to escape to the lower ...



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