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11

It's a strange method (to me, anyway) but my guess is someone put it there to prevent erosion. If you have water running from the downspout, without anything there it will basically pound a hole into the ground, as well as drain into your foundation, which can cause various problems including flooding of your basement, and cracked foundations. I guess ...


8

yes it stops the water from pooling at the base of the wall and seeping into the foundation if you can ensure all water goes into the drain there will be no danger though


6

I would cut the PVC and install a cleanout. Once reassembled, you will always have access to the tile system.


6

Disconnect the down spout. This may require you to remove screws and/or rivets. Screws are easy, just use the appropriate driver and back the screw out. Rivets, however, will have to be drilled out. Select a drill bit just larger than the hole in the head of the rivet, place the tip of the bit in the hole and drill. You're not looking to drill straight ...


4

Short term: Buy an elbow, cut the downspout and run a 15 foot gutter away from the house. Long term: Get a drain specialist in to snake it out and fix the problem.


4

You will need: 1 - Rivets or screws. I would recommend rivets for aluminum gutter 2 - An outlet for the new downspout, if you can't reuse the old one 3 - A piece of metal slightly bigger than the width of your downspout 4 - Aviation snips, if you currently don't own any 5 - Gutter sealer or solder bars 6 - A new downspout, if needed 7 - As tester101 ...


3

This type of pipe and fitting is meant for burial and is not made to seal. The pop-together fittings just ensure the pipe stays together, not leak free. If you want water tight sealing on the joints, you need to use PVC thinwall sewer/gutter drain pipe. It will have the same adapters so you can get a proper water-tight seal for the sump pump drain, a nice ...


2

If you can get access to a wet/dry shop vac, you may be able to suck the gunk out.


2

Well, fixing the damage won't prevent it from happening again, so to fix this and prevent further damages from ice in the future, you will need to install some hardware. First, you are going to need to get out the ladder and , with some assistance, push the down spout back up and re-attach it to the elbow. I'd use extra fasteners, and possibly a short rubber ...


2

This isn't a downspout problem, this is a grading problem. The ground has either eroded over time or was never properly graded in the first place. Probably a combination. Either way, the end result is that water collects in the low places and only dissipates by absorbing into the ground (not good; that can cause foundation problems like liquefaction of the ...


2

Cut the heads off using a reciprocating saw. If you do it correctly, the bracket will prevent the blade from damaging the wall.


2

Honestly, I'd use nothing. The problem is if you ever remove the screw, then the hole needs to be filled. Mount the bracket high-up, tucked under a lap, so you don't buckle the siding while installing it. Check both ends of the siding for play first. Affixed in the middle with room on both sides, it should be fine. Use screws with a fully threaded shank; ...


1

Proper drainage depends on a constant gradient. These flexible pipes don't provide that. Those concentric corrugations and the flexibility that allows them to follow ground contour with a portion of the length dropping into a depression or having to go over an obstruction leaves a pool of water that freezes. Elbows and rigid downspout stock to get the ...


1

I got a look at the picture finally. The bolts are drive pins, and the bracket has a slot that will allow the bracket to slide off to the side if you can get one removed I would guess. The bracket looks pretty thick, whereas, if you ground one of the heads off with a small right angle grinder that would allow the other side to slide off from the side. Then ...


1

If there's enough to grab hold of you could try using a pair of locking pliers and unscrewing them. The benefit is that you may not have to drill new holes for a new bracket. You could also try to pry the bracket off with a crowbar. If the screws are rusted out enough the whole assembly may come out in one piece, along with their mounting plugs. Don't put ...


1

I had to draw a small diagram to see how the area was around the house. I drew a swale in to show what is there already, or hopefully something that can be created What looks troubling here is the concentration of runoff heading to the house IF there is no swale there, that is why I hope there is one there, if not you really need to get the flow away form ...


1

Is there some particular reason not to put new holes in the bricks? My first inclination is to just drill new holes, and secure the spouts properly - after all, they did come off during a snow storm. Do you have pictures of the existing mounts? Perhaps there is a way to retrofit something onto the existing hooks but still use a modern downspout.



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