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1

One quibble with the other answers: These are indeed simple warded lever-tumbler locks. The keys for them are properly called "bit keys". Warded/lever locks don't have to be lower security than pin-tumbler locks (safe deposit boxes still use lever locks, for example) but making them both secure and affordable is harder than with pin-timbler locks. Skeleton ...


1

For this type of lock you would need to call in a specialized locksmith who can do that for you. They would need to cut a skeleton key for you. There was only one time where I went into a hardwood store and found a skeleton key and was able to fit into my closet door and actually worked. But I believe it worked because it was just a regular keyway that any ...


0

Even though it is a steel door you are able to expand the hole. You just need to the right tools to do so. I would use a different lock besides Schlage if you want something more secure then I would good with Medeco. I would use a power saw, you can get them at Home Depot, or any hardwood store. In the power saw department, they should have attachments for ...


0

The best type of lock for that situation would be to get a double sided deadbolt. So if someone where to break the window they would be able to unlock the door, they would still need a key from the inside.


1

Word of advice, do not sand the door anymore than what has occured already. You can see how there are a few lighter areas where some dings are that the "patina" has been removed by something. Sanding will ruin the patina, making the door look blotchy as well. On old furniture and doors where the cracks are not structural, burn in sticks are what I use. They ...


0

The cracks look pretty straight, so I would try to cut a thin sliver of wood, glue and wedge it in. A table saw is the easiest approach to this task. You are cutting a very thin piece that may tend to fly off the table, so be sure to wear safety glasses and stand slightly to the side, away from the strip about to be freed. The wood looks like oak. If there ...


0

Nice door - good work on the restoration! First I'd try to remove as much of the paint as possible. A putty knife and razor blade will probably help. Then the best filler would be a medium-brown tinted epoxy that matches the color of the stain you'll be applying. If that's not available, a stainable wood filler should be used.


-3

Carpenter Ants are making it a new home.


0

I would have to agree with the answer before mine in other words you set the hinges too far back towards the door stop that the door is now coming in contact with.


0

Number of pins and turns of the tumbler. Some tumblers can turn twice. I'm not sure how they work exactly but I'm assured that they are more difficult to pick. In any case, most burglars who find the front door locked will enter in via a window as they are often easier to open.


0

If you have burglers that know how (or care to know how) to pick door locks, you definitely live somewhere a lot richer than me. To a lock picker, all Yale-type pin and tumbler locks are more or less the same in terms of difficulty. You can teach an 8-year-old to reliably pick a Yale lock in about half-an-hour.


0

It was difficult to pull up by hand, because of the paint and because it's been there for awhile. But I just used a lot of force at the bottom of the door (using a hammer handle to help me pry up) and I was able to start moving it and then got it off.


0

There would be basically no difference in overall entry door security with the original type deadbolt cylinder or a good quality modern one made out of similar materials. The "rarity" of key blanks would have little bearing because expert crooks that want to pick the lock use tools that are agnostic to the shape of the lock cylinder slot. Keep in mind ...


1

I think you've hit on the easiest solution. Putting in a layer of insulation board and then boarding over the top of that is the approach I'd take. If you don't want to use the door then you can just put insulation right to the frame and board over that to hide the door completely. However, if you want to be able to use the door then you'd have to leave ...


0

I took the whole mechanism off to make it easy to work on the bench , took it apart to take out the lock with the broken key and fitted the new one i bought from Ebay ,GDS had the lock delivered in 48 hours with 2 keys £6 .00 i think . 10 minutes job done ..


1

Do test your switches with meter. Besides mechanical malfunctions like a misaligned door or switch, the contacts in these switches can be subject to internal arcing and burning which can leave deposits that interfere with good conductivity through the contacts. This can make a set of "closed" contacts appear "open". You may notice your microwave light ...


0

Stand in front of the door. If the handle moves away from you and to the left, it's left handed. If the handle moves toward you and to the right, it's left handed. If the handle moves away from you and to the right, it's right handed. If the handle moves toward you and to the left, it's right handed. Basically, if it opens away from you, it's whichever ...


0

For a quick fix to silence it, remove the cover, you will see a red block with 1 - 8 switches on/off positions. Push number one switch to the off position and replace the cover.


4

Depending on the refrigerator, there may be a way to adjust the door directly. If not, most models have height adjustable feet. Simply adjust the feet, so that the door stays in place or slowly opens. How the adjustments are made, will be specific to the make and model. Check the manufacturer's documentation for your appliance, to determine how to make the ...


0

The part which are missing from this "lockset" -- are anything resembling a lock. Did you mean knobset? Frankly, I'd rescue the knobs and the decorative escutcheon plates, and obtain a new mortise knobset or lockset for them to operate.


1

I found it! It's an Acorn Latch Kit. Thanks for the replies.


2

For #3, I'd buy a prehung door with a 6-1/2" jamb (normal for 2x6 construction) and set the jamb 1/2" proud into the workshop. This makes it easy to add drywall to the workshop in the future if desired. (And personally, I'd skip casing entirely since you're at bare studs in the workshop. If you had to have casing, I'd butt it against the jamb instead of ...


0

Ignore the catch that's there; buy a complete set: sliding screen door latch. source


1

If the bottom of the jamb is loose, shim behind it and fasten with a long screw. (Use the gap of the door to set the amount of shimming. If the screw draws the jamb in too much, back the screw out and push the shims in further.) Then, get a chunk of wood matching the jamb. I'm guessing 4-1/2" x 3/4" thick, by a few inches tall. Cut the new piece ...


0

Yes, this is just a lump of metal, big enough that it doesn't matter a lot what you lube it with. (I'd lean more to a grease than an oil -- lithium grease used with a light touch, perhaps.) But it also shouldn't need lubrication on a regular basis, so I suspect you've got something else going on.


0

Almost everything will eventually fade if left in direct sun light for years. Outside of cosmetic problems, I'd be concerned about batteries leaking or exploding. Your best bet might be to relocate the keypad to another location like the other side of the garage.



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