New answers tagged

1

Lots of over-thinking for your solution. Glass: Talk to your local window retailer about installing a shatter-resistant film on the glass. 3M and BurglarGARD films can prevent an intruder from breaking out the glass easily. Proper installation is a must. It's not as easy as adding window tint film. And an FYI: modern tempered glass for residential windows ...


0

As Chris said. If you are only doing one door, you can cut a plug, same thickness as the door, that you can glue into the existing hole, flush with the surfaces. Then mark the center of the old hole, or, the new backsets (latch) measurement, usually 1-3/8" or 1-3/4", but most are adjustable for either, from the edge of the door. Use the block for the pilot ...


1

I had a similar problem with my apartment entry door and couldn't find any answers online. So I called the building locksmith who said I should use a knife to (gently) pry off the rosette on the inside door, which is the disk that covers the base of the handle. Under the rosette should be a pair of screws that connect the two handles to either side of the ...


0

Probably not. Each manufacturer makes their equipment differently (frame dimensions, track style, roller mechanism, weatherstrip design, etc.) Even if you were lucky enough to identify the brand, chances are that the designs have changed along with modern focus on efficiency. Slim to none, I say; and I have repaired more than a few. Just internet search ...


1

Sure, if they're available. Most sliding doors simply lift out. Some have a retention mechanism that would need to be removed first. You'll probably need to level the doors to fit the frame using built-in adjusters, and verify that the latch hardware still aligns.


2

The answer suggesting using a spray foam to fill the cavities in a hollow core door is totally wrong. Hollow core doors have a "honeycomb" card board baffle inside designed to keep the door faces from warping. The spaces created inside are probably 15 square inches or so. Once the foam filled the baffled off space, you wouldn't be able to put in any more. ...


0

There are several possibilities. One, that everyone else has been pursuing, is that the lock cylinder itself is binding. If so, lubrication and/or vibration may help loosen it. If you think it might have been super glued, you can try acetone, which dissolves cyanoacrylate glues -- bug it may also dissolve the finish on the lock, and on the door, and on ...


1

(can't see the images as I am at work) I had a key get stuck in a lock half rotated once. I forget exactly what happed. I believe it has something to do with ability to set the lock for a different key, one of the pieces got jammed. I ended up disassembling the entire lock and reassembling.


2

Graphite lube is better than WD-40 for locks... try a product called lock-ease. Use a rubber mallet and whack it hard many times while turning and jiggling the key. Don't hit the key, when hammering. Keep turning-pressure on the key while hammering and jiggling. Edit- You can use WD-40 in a pinch, if you don't have graphite, but you should then use ...


5

Don't laugh, this may work as I have used it on stuck or cross-threaded bolts and locks. Remember that heat makes metals expand, while cold makes metals contract. Looks like the usual 5-pin tumbler lock. I do not know how the key is stuck, but brass is a soft metal. After long term use the surface can becomes rounded and not move the tumblers correctly. The ...


1

You removed one side of the jamb, and replaced it with new construction. But, there are 2 problems. the jamb is bowing; the jamb is not deep enough. The old jambs were 5 1/4" and fit perfectly since you have plaster instead of drywall. The new jams are 4 1/2" since they are assuming drywall. Those 2 problems are separate and should be treated as such ...


1

It appears to me you have a brick exterior and a 2x4 wall that gives you a thicker wall. At the very least, you need a jamb for 2x6 walls. That may be wide enough to fit. Then follow the instructions for proper installation. Good,luck!


-1

Jamb is installed poorly. This installation illustration may be helpful to you... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ICYwPa5_bFY


0

no - the jamb should be level and square, with the jamb being parallel to the door on all four sides. gap should be about 1/8" on the top, hinge side and strike side, and about 1/4" on the bottom. make sure the sill is dead flat and level first. this is critical for long life. the trick is to mount the hinge side first, then the top, then the strike. ...


1

It's the carpenter's responsibility to properly shim and anchor any door jamb. Unless it's a rigid steel commercial unit, it's not designed to be self-supporting. I usually shim behind each hinge on the hinge side, and at four locations, including the latch position, on the latch side. Use a combination of wedge and flat shims. For an exterior door I ...


1

You were close with your search term, but try searching, "roller catch". You'll find a ton of choices. (edit to add a couple of thoughts...) Regarding repair versus replace: it's impossible at this distance to know, but replace usually is more predictable. (And in this case, probably not too expensive.) And as a general rule, when I'm searching for ...


1

if this is an anodized aluminum sill (thats what it looks like), try using brake fluid. it will destroy just about any paint bond out there. just wipe up afterwards and degrease with a good quality degreaser. be wary though, if its anything else other that anodized aluminum (or an other uncoated metal), the brake fluid will destroy the coating (even ...


1

you can just replace your house lock or locks with weiser smartkey units, and then buy a weiser smart keyed padlock. i have six smartkey locks on the doors in my home, and a dozen or so padlocks. all can be operated with a single key. and, as a bonus, you can rekey your locks yourself in about 30 seconds.


4

A locksmith can order (if necessary) and set up padlocks or locking hasps that respond to your house key, unless the house lock is using a particularly uncommon key blank. They may be a bit larger than the ones designed to be sold in bulk, and they will probably be a bit more expensive, but the price shouldn't be unreasonable.



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