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1

There are a few adjustment that are pretty easy to do, once you figure out which adjustment screw does what, That can be sorted out by trial and error. There should be one on the other end too. One is backcheck, which I could never figure out what it really did, and the other two are closing speed, which is good in the video, and the last one is latch speed ...


1

It turns out electronic locks (and door passage sets—a.k.a. door handle sets) have a limited range of door thicknesses they install in. A condo I used to live in had a mondo solid wood entry door 2.5 inches thick (exterior doors are normally 1.75 inches thick). To obtain a suitable electronic lock required a special order, 8 weeks, and $750. It was ...


9

Installation instructions depend on the exact model of "electronic door lock" you purchase. Most of the low-cost/self-contained units install into a standard cylindrical-lock bore (ie, in place of the normal knobset and/or deadbolt), occasionally with another hole or two to anchor them firmly in place. That's an easy retrofit. Commercial-type units, where ...


4

Honestly, building an exterior door is not a DIY project. It's more complex than you would think, especially if your planning on having it be lighted (with windows). As for building it out of plywood, even if you had a way to press it up properly (a vacuum press) it would not stay flat long term. Hands down your best bet is going to be finding an ...


3

This would be only moderately difficult to reproduce on your own: Buy a slab exterior door. This will be $200-300. If you can't find it for that price, look harder. Frame the door plus the left panel. $50 Cut out panels in door (probably jigsaw). Free Hang door. Free Add trim panels on outside surface. Might need something custom unless you want ...


7

It is of course possible for an individual to make a door that provides a normal level of performance. The probability that a person without knack for or reasonable experience performing finish carpentry is, however, rather low. To perform to a normal level, a door needs to fit within a tight tolerance and maintain dimensional stability without twisting or ...


0

I see that you posted under a carpentry tag. however, my solution would be to find a section of Aluminium Tubing, or tubing profile which fits the "gap" which you describe. As You can see, the example picture is a rectangular profile, which will run the entire height of the door, To fill the specified gap. Your problem will be to attach said profile ...


1

First, Minwax wiping stains are inferior...so is there conditioner...in fact the only thing they do well is marketing. Step up to Sherwin Williams BAC or Old Masters and you'll never look back. Having said that, in this case you need a gel stain. Second, conditioner although indispensable when working with soft woods, will only get you so far. With a quality ...


0

Since you can rarely get rid of all rust without sanding completely through the metal, due to pitting, you should remove as much as possible, and the apply a rust fixer.


0

I paint all metal doors with automotive primer (helps with rust and binds harder) and automotive spray paint. Need to spray a good distance away and layer it on lightly but if you take your time it can look almost perfect. Bonus points for following it up with a clear coat a few days later.


3

Priming and Painting Galvanized Metal, condensed from KILZ.com, other manufacturers also make specific paints and primers for galvanized metal. The galvanizing process, which is designed to prevent rust, leaves an oily film that can prevent coating adhesion. The zinc in galvanized metal can produce a milky “white rust” (which is common when it has ...


2

Wirebrush the rust to remove it. Apply a primer designed to adhere to bare metal. (I'm fond of those which react chemically with rust to help finish the job of preparing the surface, but those are only available in dark colors as far as I know.) Then apply a paint compatible with that primer -- not all paints layer happily on top of each other; generally you ...


0

Judging by the picture and your description I'd say those are indeed the adjustment screws that raise and lower the rail of threshold (the part that makes the seal with the bottom of the door). If the door is installed normally removing these will not help you remove the threshold. It will be attached to the jamb via screws that run through the jamb into the ...


1

It is an advantage that your door actually comes with the door pre-drilled. In the cases where the door is not pre-drilled then it is necessary to do the whole schmoo of drilling these holes in the proper locations. Included with that is the job of fitting the lockset edge plates into the properly crafted depression so that the plate is flush or ever so ...


1

Do you have a deadbolt? Try putting it in. Although the bolt is rectangular, it is slightly smaller than the one inch hole so it should fit just fine. The facing which guides the bolt screws into the edge of the door to hold it stable. It is possible some chiseling will be needed to make the bolt's facing flush with the door.



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