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1

A piece of tape over the latch hole, or the latch itself would prevent the latch from catching. You could also remove the latch from the door, and replace it when you move out.


4

Sounds more like a case for a doorstop -- either wedge style, or flip-down, or (what's becoming my personal favorite) magnetic -- to hold the door open rather than arguing with the latch. And that would leave you with the option of closing the door if you ever have houseguests or other reasons to do so.


2

When I was growing up, we just stuffed whatever we could find (paper, plastic, etc) into the latch hole to fill it up. That would probably work for you. I didn't come up with the stuff to keep the door from latching, and I didn't make it better. <-- Lame 3M joke.


0

We have just gotten an indoor kitten and already have an indoor/outdoor dog. The current "doggy door" is inside a cabinet whose doors have been removed. If the product described above was produced, it would answer our problems. The other idea we've had is to create an electronic field around the opening of the cabinet which allows the dog entrance but the ...


0

Key-in-Knob sets are common because they're cheap and easy to throw into a door, and they save the contractors the hassle of installing a deadbolt. That does not mean they're mandatory. Even where self-locking doors are needed, there are multiple ways to achieve that, many of which are more secure than the typical KIK set. The downside of not having the ...


2

Some jurisdictions, such as New York City, require self-closing, self-locking doors to the entry of multiple family dwellings (,8 or more units), but do not seem to require them on smaller housing units (such as one or two family homes) or on the individual apartments within a larger unit. Even when locks are required, they do not need to be in the knob of ...


0

Since you say the doors only stick in the winter, that would lean more towards the humidity/temp changes you mention. As for the cracks, could be part of that, could be from just natural settling of the home over time. As to things to do about it, I'd just point you to an easily found article on the net where someone else has already gone through the ...


0

Several ways to approach the problem come to mind: Discourage noise makers: make changes to the environment so the noise makers want to leave: make the hallway temperature uncomfortable, install atrocious art, provide a repellent scent, disagreeable noises, threatening animals, and/or arrange scary/dangerous passers-by. Decrease the sound reaching your ...


1

Plans for a screen door were published in the August 2010 issue of Woodworker's Journal, if that helps at all. Try libraries and/or see if you can find someone who'd lend you their copy.


0

Is this a split jamb door with the casing already attached? If so, then if the casing hides the gap with room left on the outer edge of the casing to fasten, the door will work fine for the rough opening. The most important part of the installation (other than plumb & level) is that you cut or otherwise use snug-fitting shims frequently -at least, one ...


0

I assume you have a two piece split jamb pre-hung door. It's expected that these will be smaller than the rough opening, you need room to make the door plumb and level. Here's the install steps off the top of my head and my own personal best practice: Check your width of the rough opening to ensure the trim will cover any gaps left, this is the main ...


0

I am replacing a door with a pre - hung door including the jam. A pre-hung door is a door that includes the frame with the hinges, lock and strike-plate fitted. A blank door is one where you have to fit the hinges, cut a rebate for the lock/catch and drill a hole for the handles, fit a frame to the wall if there is no existing frame and fit the door to ...


0

The door or frame could be warped, which means replacing or rebuilding one of them. It's also possible that the door is simply poorly installed, in which case moving the hinges around would solve it.


0

You can use any of the options listed above but they are not strictly speaking necessary. French doors have whats called an astragal (the strip on the passive door that overlaps the swing door) that unifies the two doors when closed. In addition the passive side will have a flush bolt top and bottom that drives a tab into the header and threshold. You can ...


1

A door/knob that is set properly will make very little noise during normal operation. The noise caused by the door hitting the jamb is almost certainly a function of misalignment (i.e. the door is striking the jamb stop at only one location). When properly hung the tight tolerances will trap air as the door closes and create a natural cushioning effect. ...


2

If you just want the bathroom door held closed, remove the latch mechanism totally, install a dummy knob and use a magnetic closure to hold the door in place. You do not even need the magnet to touch the matched plate on the stronger ones. If you are using a bit of foam or a vinyl bumper on the door itself, adjust the magnet back from the plate until it is ...


0

Painting the doors probably would've helped. Moisture penetrated through the unpainted top of the door and bottom.


1

I had two doors that would stick, a hand plane was much more effective then sanding. If you do not have one buy an Empire Pocket plane, they are around 10 dollars and just as effective.


0

Your doors will fluctuate and if your contractor made them snug then during the summer they will need to be "adjusted". Just installed two doors in my basement snug this past winter knowing they would stick. They are currently sticking - barely close. So I will pull them off hinges and hit them with a belt sander on the non-hinge side.


2

I would bet the doors were dryer than they are now. Most basements are more humid than the rest of a typical home, especially in the summer. In the winter they will shrink again, but it will be needed to trim a little here and there to get them to work in the summer.


1

If the door panel, the moving part, is not clad (covered with metal) on the outside, the easiest way to remedy the problem is to plane about an 1/8" off the door itself. The weather-stripping is part of the jamb so it will not be affected. The interior side of the track will have a few screws holding it place. I see one screw hole in the picture, looks like ...


1

Aha! It's a "Sargent". Found the answer here http://youtu.be/VyzTw5l-xhs Thank you, Internet!



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