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You can add some shims in the mortise and plug the existing screw holes so you can reposition them. If the plate does not fit then enlarging the hole for it with a chisel will work. There are 2 things that you will want to align: the holes in the door jamb where the lock engages (a.k.a. the strike plate). to help with that add some masking tape with ...


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For filling holes on the jamb, I have had the most success using a two-part wood filler (similar to automotive body filler). Slightly overfill the old hole and let it set, then plane it down with a Surform plane ("cheese grater" plane) until level. Coarse then fine sand until smooth, prime, and paint to match. You will not be able to tell there was ever a ...


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The usual approach is to attach a cover plate. If you just want to close the hole, there are disks that secure from the back side of the door. If you're going to need to drill new holes, which might overlap the old holes, there are plates which wrap around the side of the door; they can be had in various finishes and can be fairly decorative.


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There should be a catch release hidden on the underside of the inner knob. Push in, hold, pull knob out with your 3rd hand. If you don't care about the knobs you can be lazy and just cut/bend/crush the escutcheon plate to get to the screws.


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The strike plate that you have looks like a very odd ball unit. It is either specially made for a specific application and misapplied here OR is some artsy piece of hardware that is a PITA (as you have found out). You should remove one and take it with you to the hardware or big-box store for size reference. Then look for a much more conventional type of ...


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Cutting it would be okay so long as you keep enough of the bend for it to function properly. Having said that, the tab on that strike looks exceptionally long to me. You might want to see if you can pick up a new one that has a more appropriately sized tab, it would be way easier than modifying the old one.


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Installing a proper threshold will reduce or eliminate water infiltration under the door. Notice that water would have to flow uphill in order to pass these adjustable height thresholds: The lower one has a sill extension, the upper does not. Products of this type are available for both in-swinging and out-swinging doors.


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Subject directly to the laws of physics and legally to both local land development regulations and covenants specific to the property, any construction project is possible when a sufficient combination of labor, material, and economic resources are allocated to its completion. At least, that's the theory, since one's partner or partners may still say "no." ...


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A front door is just a controlled hole in the wall. But it is very controlled. You are right to think that there are structural issues. The wall where the door is located has several of its upright structural members (studs) removed. There has to be a horizontal support (header) added to make up for that, and extra vertical supports under that. The exact ...


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It's almost certainly possible... basically you're adding a new door, then closing up the old one, both of which are fairly standard operations during renovations. Assuming a wooden-framed house, your place is recent enough that it's probably very straighforward. Should just be a matter of opening up the wall surfaces, framing the doorway (properly) to ...


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A heavy rubber band from handle to handle


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You can buy a louvered vent for the door. You can probably find them at your local home improvement store. I'm assuming this is a standard hollow core door. The hole can be cut using a a standard jigsaw with a fine tooth metal cutting blade. If it is an orbital jigsaw, you want to set it to have the least aggressive cut as possible to ensure a smooth cut. ...


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There are latches which have a HDPE strip on the face. I have no idea whether they can be purchased separately as a retrofit, or whether that would reduce the sound significantly. You'd still have the sound of the latch springing back into the strike opening, though it might be possible to muffle that. There are latches which swing back into their recess ...


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I did this today on a wood door using a Dremel with a sanding attachment on it. First I outlined in pencil where the screws hit the door and sanded out that part, first on one side of the door, and then the other. Once the screws would go through, I traced a line where the door knob would be inserted into the door (this was on the lock side only.) Since ...


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There are a few adjustment that are pretty easy to do, once you figure out which adjustment screw does what, That can be sorted out by trial and error. There should be one on the other end too. One is backcheck, which I could never figure out what it really did, and the other two are closing speed, which is good in the video, and the last one is latch speed ...


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It turns out electronic locks (and door passage sets—a.k.a. door handle sets) have a limited range of door thicknesses they install in. A condo I used to live in had a mondo solid wood entry door 2.5 inches thick (exterior doors are normally 1.75 inches thick). To obtain a suitable electronic lock required a special order, 8 weeks, and $750. It was ...


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Installation instructions depend on the exact model of "electronic door lock" you purchase. Most of the low-cost/self-contained units install into a standard cylindrical-lock bore (ie, in place of the normal knobset and/or deadbolt), occasionally with another hole or two to anchor them firmly in place. That's an easy retrofit. Commercial-type units, where ...


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Honestly, building an exterior door is not a DIY project. It's more complex than you would think, especially if your planning on having it be lighted (with windows). As for building it out of plywood, even if you had a way to press it up properly (a vacuum press) it would not stay flat long term. Hands down your best bet is going to be finding an ...


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This would be only moderately difficult to reproduce on your own: Buy a slab exterior door. This will be $200-300. If you can't find it for that price, look harder. Frame the door plus the left panel. $50 Cut out panels in door (probably jigsaw). Free Hang door. Free Add trim panels on outside surface. Might need something custom unless you want ...


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It is of course possible for an individual to make a door that provides a normal level of performance. The probability that a person without knack for or reasonable experience performing finish carpentry is, however, rather low. To perform to a normal level, a door needs to fit within a tight tolerance and maintain dimensional stability without twisting or ...


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I see that you posted under a carpentry tag. however, my solution would be to find a section of Aluminium Tubing, or tubing profile which fits the "gap" which you describe. As You can see, the example picture is a rectangular profile, which will run the entire height of the door, To fill the specified gap. Your problem will be to attach said profile ...



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