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0

I too wish you luck. The parts you show are made from 'pot metal.' Such parts have a short life in the best of times. For older hardware on the cheap, I think ebay, the ReBuilding Center in Portland http://rebuildingcenter.org/ or somewhere from here http://portlandonthecheap.com/homeimprovement.html would likely be your best chance


0

Post is old but here's wot I plan as decisive "easy-fix" of grossly over-repaired(destroyed) frame hinge-points: - cut out offset T-shape at bad hinge-points in frame (multi-tool or sharp chisel) leaving as much at frame edge still viable (not essential but avoids reshaping) - shape similar replacement wood "jigsaw-style" piece to fit hole tightly - dowel ...


4

Don't head off half cocked with internet advice and a 10" brick wall above. Hire a structural/civil engineer, and get an answer you can bet your house and/or life on - because you will be doing exactly that. Having got the advice, follow it carefully. Given that you say "small door" your engineer might be able to give you a less painful solution by using a ...


0

If you rent the apartment, then the landlord is responsible for maintaining and repairing the doors and locks. If you own the apartment, then you're responsible. Since the door jamb is steel, filing the striker plate to a larger size is your only option as long as the hinges are not causing the door to sag.


0

Cardboard shims have been a long time fix for door hinges to adjust the gap. Make sure first the screws are still holding. If they have gotten loose then it may only need tightening or perhaps filling the old hole with carved dowels and resetting the original screws to get the door to draw back in place. You may use longer screws to accomplish the same ...


1

You don't have to have a ladder for a second story window. However I would buy one and keep it in a well known place. They are literally $30 for a drop ladder. I won't recommend any because I have never had to use one and don't want to recommend anything that is poor. First any municipality will make you have formal stairs getting to the second level. ...


0

You will have to have two forms of egress. Your stairs likely counts as one, as long as it's appropriately sized. A properly sized window in each room could be your second. Depending on your location, there may be requirements for ladders from any egress x ft. above final grade.


0

It may depend on your use of the term second story, which means different things in different parts of the world. If you have a ground floor (ground level access) a first floor (no ground level access) and a second floor it is normal and customary to provide two means of egress (dual staircases, a staircase and an external fire escape, etc.) from bedrooms ...


4

You want the doors to overlap a bit. You also want the two doors to be the same width so when they are slid all the way to one side or the other that they are even. A one inch overlap is about ideal so for a 48" finished opening each door would be 24.5 inches wide. Two 24" doors would not overlap at all and would not stay fully engaged into the center ...


1

The "inside" handle (on the right in the last/lower picture) will have a small spring-loaded button on the handle post (the part you don't put your hand on when opening/closing). Use an awl or equivalent tool to depress the button and remove the inside handle. Then unscrew the inside trim ring (lefty/loosey) to expose the screws that hold the whole assembly ...


0

The disk(s? your pictures seem to only show one side clearly) may be threaded. The exterior one should have a "detent" that it keys into on the face of the door - the inside one would not. When both are tight, the outside one should not be able to be turned. In some cases the inside one is threaded and the outside one is held in place by screws that the ...


1

That door originally had a mortise lock and I'm assuming this is in an old building. It looks like someone custom made an adapter plate to put a modern bored cylindrical lock in as a replacement. You can either find a replacement mortise lock (just do a google search and you will find lots of sites that have replacement hardware). Or you can go with your ...


1

Go with plan B. The larger strike looks like either of two things, a reinforcement for a damaged mount for the strike bolt. The door slab looks ever so slightly thicker at the strike location, like the screws somehow split the door at the strike. Or the door originally had a mortise lock set and this part serves as an adapter so to get a standard knob to ...


-1

Take your screen to a glass company. They usually have or can get replacement rollers.



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