Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

This looks to be like a schlange or kwikset lockset commonly found at Home Depot. You can easily re-cylinder this, but it isn't obvious how to get the lock off. My solution was as follows: Rotate the lever to the vertical position. There will be two screws hidden under it. Remove them, and separate the lock into two halves. The lock-half has a cover on ...


2

Fortis is a schlage product. go onto their web site and you might find what you are looking for. but most schlage products the parts are interchangeable so you can buy new locks and just reuse the latches.


1

Longer screws in old houses won't work, you will just hit plaster. Pull casing, cut out bad, new block of wood to fill cut out, longer piece slid behind new piece between jamb and stud creating overlap on top and bottom.


2

If you are having a hard time finding the strikes that do not have the rectangular plate, many latchset makers have the round ones like you have in the box with the others. Seems to me that they make the bolts or latch fit into any situation. According to one of the manufacturers the type of bolt you are looking for is called a "drive-in" latch Or as ...


-1

Get narrow weather seal and put it on the door jamb so the door never touches the wood.


0

Your best bet is to take it off and take it to your local locksmith. You will have a hard time getting it out and should use a Phillips screwdriver to pull it toward you. This type of deadbolt is called a "slam in deadbolt" (at least thats what I call it). You may need to tap the screwdriver with a hammer to get the old one out and the new one in.


0

When the door side hinge holes have been stripped out of the cardboard-like wood, or MDF, which serves as the door's interior frame, I have removed several inches by using a razor knife to cut away the door skin from, say 6", and then replaced the MDF with a solid wood block. I glue it in and clamp it, of course.


0

If you want a quick/easy fix, just reset the door jamb. The jamb is the 1 x 1/4 moulding that the door hits when it is closed. This can be removed and a new one added where the door actually closes. As long as the door isn't too far out of line, no one will ever notice.


0

If it's a wooden door, the door leaf could have warped/twisted. Quite often you can (if you have the space e.g. a workbench) cramp the door up so that it is twisted the opposite way, leave it for a few days and then when you release the cramps the door will spring back to a position where it is (substantially) flat. If the door is already flat, then it may ...


0

Check the frame for a lean with a level. If the frame is square and true then you need to rehang the door: I.e., chisel out the hinges and rescrew them so the door hangs and swings perfectly perpendicularly to the frame.


1

You could try a steam iron over a linen cloth it works on dents on solid wood. I appears on the picture your dent might be a break in the wood. Give the steam a try.


0

Have you tried changing the configuration of open windows? This can have enough effect on airflow to completely remove the problem


1

You could glue/tape the panels to a sheet of tempered hardboard (ie, Masonite®) or thin plywood and mount that to the door. Properly sized, your grid method should also work, and might look nicer.


0

I too wish you luck. The parts you show are made from 'pot metal.' Such parts have a short life in the best of times. For older hardware on the cheap, I think ebay, the ReBuilding Center in Portland http://rebuildingcenter.org/ or somewhere from here http://portlandonthecheap.com/homeimprovement.html would likely be your best chance


0

Post is old but here's wot I plan as decisive "easy-fix" of grossly over-repaired(destroyed) frame hinge-points: - cut out offset T-shape at bad hinge-points in frame (multi-tool or sharp chisel) leaving as much at frame edge still viable (not essential but avoids reshaping) - shape similar replacement wood "jigsaw-style" piece to fit hole tightly - dowel ...


4

Don't head off half cocked with internet advice and a 10" brick wall above. Hire a structural/civil engineer, and get an answer you can bet your house and/or life on - because you will be doing exactly that. Having got the advice, follow it carefully. Given that you say "small door" your engineer might be able to give you a less painful solution by using a ...


0

If you rent the apartment, then the landlord is responsible for maintaining and repairing the doors and locks. If you own the apartment, then you're responsible. Since the door jamb is steel, filing the striker plate to a larger size is your only option as long as the hinges are not causing the door to sag.


0

Cardboard shims have been a long time fix for door hinges to adjust the gap. Make sure first the screws are still holding. If they have gotten loose then it may only need tightening or perhaps filling the old hole with carved dowels and resetting the original screws to get the door to draw back in place. You may use longer screws to accomplish the same ...



Top 50 recent answers are included