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I say oil based primer & paint. And the reason is, most of the manufactured doors these days are veneered & not solid. Water based Acrylic primer & paint are okay on a solid wood door , but is is bad for veneered doors. I sell both types of doors. And my customers are all told to use oil based products when finishing their doors. If they don't ...


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There are a lot of options you could consider depending on your budget and opinion on "cheap". There are acoustic dampening windows you could look into if you have a higher budget and don't mind replacing your window. If you're sure that the main source of noise penetration is through the window, which is to be expected, then this might be the best / most ...


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I have very good results filling lock bores and hinge mortises on doors, and latch holes in jambs, using 2 part wood filler. It's polyester resin filler similar to automobile body filler: bonds tightly, easily shaped with "cheese grater" planes and sandpaper, cures hard, will not shrink, can be drilled/screwed into/chiseled, etc. Works great as long as you ...


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1/8th" Luaun plywood from the big box store and a good chisel should let you cut out very tight fitting patch pieces with some practice. That'll get it into paint shape. For a stain finish, you would have to try to match the grain and color, which would be a bit harder.


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The door comes already attached to the frame, with all those screws you see. These are rather short screws as they can't be longer than the thickness of the frame, since it's an assembled unit. The missing screw on the frame side is to be a long screw. That goes through the frame, through any surface material in the hole in the wall, and into the structural ...


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Long (3") screws (3 or 4) through the jamb into the framing of the house should do it. Be careful not to drive them too tight; otherwise you'll warp the jamb and the door will fit loosely. In a perfect world, you'd predrill the jamb with a drill bit big enough that the screw goes through it readily (but not too loose). If you have the same problem on the ...


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It may or may not have something to do with superstition. As far as my memory of Superstition of the old goes, horse shoes and other things that had to be fixated with nails and other things were generally only fixated with 7 units.


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Just some notes: This is just plain lazy. Maybe he forgot but forgetting = lazy. Maybe he ran out of screws. But these are basically the most common type of door screws so again that goes back to being lazy. When installing doors it is best practice to get at least one screw per hinge all the way into the actual framing of the wall. This requires some ...


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This sounds like a defect in the garage opener, probably in the receiver electronics. A device like this should not stop working without warning and restart again on a "reboot". I would look into whether you can replace the receiver without replacing the entire device.


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Wayfaring Stranger has the right of it. Citric acid is far better at dissolving the calcium-magnesium-soap scum mix than vinegar. Here in Dallas we have the worst limescale/soap scum buildup I've experienced. Having tried CLR, vinegar, and several other remedies, I was not prepared for how effective, easy, and odorless citric acid could be. My suggestion ...


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You should check the hinges, and make sure the screws are tight and that the hinges are not worn out. Evidence of a worn out hinge will be that the door hangs at an angle, which is likely to be visible along the top of the shut door. If the door appears to be crooked, or if it wobbles when you lift it, then you should replace the hinges before moving making ...


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You won't get cheaper or easier than two layers of sheet lumber. Particle board is a common component in 30-minute fire doors (though they usually have a hardwood veneer). I'd do just as you plan. Sand or route a bullnose all the way around and seal it with a couple coats of urethane, smoothing with steel wool between.


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You can't (practically speaking) make your slabs thinner. It would be a monumental undertaking considering the nature of hollow-core doors and symmetrical mortising. You can either move the stops or get new slabs and start over. To move the stops, slice the paint with a utility knife, then work a steel putty knife behind the stop to loosen it. Gently pry ...


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Figured it out using the Related postings prior, and removed the anti-pry plate by prying it off. Oh, the irony. Thx, SE et al. Those lever type door handles are the bomb.



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