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5

I'm not sure it makes sense to spend money and effort retrofitting something on a 30 year old opener. How much longer do you think it will really last? New garage door openers can be had for around $150 and in addition to the "rolling code" remotes will include several other benefits like an electric eye safety sensor, auto-reversing contact sensor, vacation ...


2

What you want is a HomeLink Conversion Kit. This will replace the wireless receiver of your old garage door opener. Or wire up like a button. If the wireless receiver is built in to your opener then you will need to find a way to disable it, otherwise someone will still be able to send the dipswitch code and activate your opener.


6

This door had been broken before, there is caulk or some type of filler at the edges of the break, where some stayed on one side, some stayed on the other. This will really give you a hard time to get the parts tight enough for glue to do it job. All caulk MUST be removed from the glue area. You can use a fresh blade in a razor knife to carefully pare it ...


1

Did the door jam closed because the jamb had settled or warped? If so, you'd be better off replacing rather than repairing the jamb. I would tear out the old jamb and door and buy a replacement pre-hung door with jamb. You then will shim the new jamb into the opening. Once plumb and true, you'll nail the jamb in place through the shims, then trim it out ...


4

I would use a good quality wood glue, clamp it, wipe away excess glue, and let it dry. After it is dry, you should sand it along the fracture, wood putty to fill any depressions, and let dry. Sand and then repaint.


2

Pry off the molding on the wall face of the broken part. If the split piece will fit back together (with some persuasion, of course), glue, clamps, a few finish nails, move on. The wall molding is easily replaced or can be reassembled similarly once the jamb is repaired. Given that everything is painted, a bit of wood filler and fresh paint, little if any ...


0

If you don't mind the look, the easiest and least risky solution is to secure the door pieces with mending plates. All you have to do is put the joints back together and pre drill the screw holes.


0

Hard to tell... Is that bare wood at the bottom of the door part of the door or part of the door frame? It looks like part of the door. Either way it's rotted or at the very least just swollen up from moisture. You need to replace the whole door. It's not worth the trouble to try and repair just the section for such a small inexpensive door. You can get ...


0

Without seeing the doors, this is speculation, but I'd probably want to pin the joints with approximately 12" long 5/8" dowels epoxied in. This assumes that the door is solid wood, not particle core with a veneer skin. remove doors square and clamp drill 2 holes per joint from the stiles with long auger bit. The adventure here is that if you stray off ...


2

I don't think it makes much difference. Assuming no disability (you are opening the door with a fully working hand, not a stick or your foot, or unable to grip things), the first option (curved up) is a bit easier to open. In the first image, I would grab the handle with my left hand, with my wrist starting slightly rotated clockwise, and rotate it ...


3

This looks to be an interior door. The best way to fix this is to take off the door casing trim at the latch side on both sides of the door opening. Then using opposing pairs of tapered shims sticking in between the door frame and the adjacent stud you pound in the shims so that the lower portion of the door frame is crowded over closer to the door. I would ...


-1

Move the hinge over and drill new holes in the new place. Go to your interior or exterior door Get your screws and tool box Remove the screws from the door and door jamb and chisel out the wood where you would like to drill pilot holes. Drill the holes then drill in the 3 inch screws and then it's fixed


2

Swinging inch thick wood is liable to trap cat tails. The cat will not enjoy having its tail pinched. I use multiple layers of cloth, say 3 for an inch thick gap, for an effective, cat friendly airlock. Tack or staple in place. Oh yes, you can weight the bottom of the cloth so as to ensure it always hangs properly.


1

I would suggest that to make it hinge in a workable manner whilst at the same time not detract from the looks on the outside of the cabinet that you cut the wood like this. (This is an on edge view)


3

If there is such a hinge it would leave a big gap and the door might be too heavy for your cat to comfortably go through it. I looked into this myself and decided it would be best to just use a cat flap like this one. http://store.petsafe.net/2-way-locking-cat-door Alternately you can do something similar like round over the top of your wood and use 2 ...


3

According to the International Building Code, door knobs should be between 34" - 48" above the finished floor. International Building Code 2012 Chapter 10 Means of Egress Section 1008 Doors, Gates and Turnstiles 1008.1.9.2 Hardware height. Door handles, pulls, latches, locks and other operating devices shall be installed 34 inches (864 ...


0

I will try to figure out you situation. You have only one door the has a good acceptable gap at the top and bottom, but huge in the center. You have new door leaves you are installing, presuming the edges are still factory straight, or like factory straight, if you had to trim on the door to get it to fit the original jambs.. If the door has a 3rd hinge, the ...


2

Since to problem occurred only after the hinges were replaced, and presuming the door had no other issues, the fix will need to be only with the hinges. There may have been a cardboard shim behind the old hinges to tweak them in place, many doors need this as time goes on. That is all you should need as well. Cereal box cardboard or similar material work ...


0

There are several ways to adjust hinges, but you first need to examine the door to determine which way it needs to be adjusted. What you're looking for is if the hinge is closing tight or if there's a gap from the weight of the door pulling the hinge slightly apart. Often the problem is only at the top corner and that may be solved by doing a better job ...



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