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4

I think if you use a couple coats of good primer and a finish coat of enamel paint, you should be fine. Just be sure to work it into the wood well. Two thin coats are always better than one thick coat. The cat door is gonna protect the cut edges quite a bit as well. Put a small bead of silicone caulk on the inside of the cat door bezel before you install it ...


3

Generally for interior doors the RO (Rough Opening) is 2 inches wider than the door slab. This gives 3/4" for the jamb and 1/4" of 'play' for each side, for you to adjust the jamb to make the door operate properly. So if you've got 29 13/16 instead of 30, you'll end up with a little over 1/4 of play total instead of 1/2. Still should be plenty if your jacks ...


3

I agree with S Rura. The only way to do this without messing with the siding is to install a nice trim or brickmold. You will need to install a plywood filler to match the depth from your rough framing to the siding level. Caulk all the seams. Then install some ripped(if necessary) brickmold or other flat trim like painted pine, MDF, or PVC. Then caulk ...


3

The two primary factors are latch operation and weather sealing (where applicable). 1/4" (6mm) is getting fairly large, but still within what I'd consider acceptable. It's hard to say without seeing it all in action. Much more than that and I'd take your approach of shimming the hinges, but use some nylon or other non-biodegradable material in the case of ...


2

There are certainly mortise-form-factor smart locks; I installed one of them last year. They tend to be commercial-grade rather than home-grade; more durable and able to handle more complex programming but also more expensive. At one point several manufacturers were offering smart mortise cylinders, which did a digital handshake with a powered key to make ...


2

You bought a pet flap made for a thinner door. There are pet flaps that come made for thicker doors that have an adjustment range that covers the thickness of door that you have. Some indeed will also come with a tunnel piece which gets discarded when installing on a thinner door. I would recommend returning the pet flap for one designed for the thicker ...


2

You could try iron-on white melamine banding, usually used to finish the edges of particle board for cabinets or furniture. The banding usually comes in ¾" or ⅝" wide sizes, and it may be a challenge to find the banding in the width you need, but I know I've seen it in a few places.


2

Assuming these doors are exactly the same size, you should switch the doors by unscrewing each door's hinges from its frame, and then reinstalling in the other frame. You will probably need to mark the outline of the hinges in their new positions and carefully countersink the outline with a sharp wood chisel. You will need to switch the strike plates as well,...


2

In security the principle of weakest link applies. It's not possible to tell if the surface mounting alone will be the point of failure in your setup. The material of the door, the frame, hinges and the part which is most often overlooked: how well is the frame mounted to the wall pay equal role in providing security. There is nothing inherently wrong in ...


2

I think it's a push latch or a push to close latch for sliding doors- like the one pictured below:


1

hard to say without knowing more about the floor plan. Maybe they're in a longer section of floor. Maybe there are plumbing fixtures that required a shift in layout. Who knows? It doesn't much matter whether you use one header or three, but you'll want trimmer studs supporting it or them between each pair of doors. Otherwise you'd need to size the header ...


1

From what little you have shown us, I'll fault it for inadequate attachment to door frame, and possibly to door. There are reasonably strong surface-mount ("rim") locksets. The Seagal-style vertical deadbolt design is something of a classical in that space; a non-junk lock, installed properly with hardened screws thru frame and into actual wall joists, can ...


1

If by "unsafe" you meant that the catch can be overcome fairly easily with blunt force, then yes, this is unsafe. Nothing short of high-security hardware, properly installed, is "safe" in my book. If you're looking to keep out nuisance kids and lazy thieves, use that. If you're looking to defend against armed burglars or other human threats, don't trust it....



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