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5

It may seem too simple to work, but you just need to cut your own tailor-made cat door. Basically, a cat can get through any opening it can fit its head through. This usually works against us cat owners, since the beasties have a mind of their own and like to explore. This time, it may work in our favor. So: Measure cat head (breadth), add 1/4 inch to ...


3

They sell an expensive version of a common product sold under a dozen different names, many of which can be found substantially cheaper at big box home improvement stores or even online.


2

When I had cats, I used a doorway gate that they sell to keep small children away from steps or out of a room. The cat goes right through it but the dog can't. source


2

You can use cat tunnels that are elevated above where the dog is able to reach. Google has several images of cat tunnels at ceiling height, it is important to check for wires before installing elevated access ways, but cutting and patching holes in drywall is much easier then cutting and patching holes in doors. Also the dog will not try to dig their way ...


2

I'm going to try for an outside-the-box solution: How about a cat flap or cat passage _away from the door and above the dog's easy line of sight -- possibly from a shelf the cat can climb or jump to, with similar access on the other side of the wall? I think that would be something the cat could quickly learn to use but that simply wouldn't be an idea the ...


2

Standard EMT tool for tempered glass car windows (after taping - packing tape preferred over duct tape) is an automatic center punch. A hammer and nail will work the same, it's mostly being a one-handed tool that's easy to carry that makes the ACP the preferred tool among EMTs. If you're "smashing the whatever" out of it, you're doing it wrong. It just ...


2

It seems that taping it and enclosing with cardboard were good precautionary safety measures. It may be tempered glass, if so it will be more difficult to break and will shatter into a thousand small pieces (like auto glass). Put a tarp under your work area, wear a heavy long-sleeved jacket, wear safety glasses, and smash the s*%t out of it.


2

When a key is stuck in a pin-tumbler lock, what that usually means is that one of the pins has dropped down into the key's cuts but isn't lifting back out of the way so the key can be withdrawn. There are several possible causes. One is that the key was cut badly and doesn't have enough of a slope to lift the pin as it is pulled back. Uncommon, though ...


2

If it went in it will come out. Squirt some graphite lube in there and pull the key, hard, with pliers. If the lock breaks... you needed a new one anyway.


1

Usually this stuff is metal, known as "interlocking weatherstrip", but since that's not a great search term, it's often found in the same vicinity as "spring bronze weatherstripping". Check kilianhardware.com, under the springbronze tab.


1

That wire wheel might help if there are nooks and crannys, like fine detail. But I am afraid what you will need is a lot of elbow grease and sandpaper. Starting with coarse and working down to fine, using steel wool and/or wire bushes for the detail work. Good quality chemical strippers are helpful if you are able to cope with the mess/smell/health hazards. ...



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