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13

Go out a door that's not blocked and walk to the blocked one to clear the snow. If all your doors are blocked go out a window and do the same. If it's a screen door, remove the screen and reach through the opening to move the snow. You can use a broom or even a pot or baking pan if your don't have a shovel within reach.


7

You could just chill out. Putting up bars or plastic on that door is truly ghetto. Doors like this are not inherently unsafe at all. Your door is appropriate for your neighborhood. Your door would be unsafe or inappropriate for a bad neighborhood or an apartment building. Having this glass probably does not effect your chances of burglary by ...


7

You could consider attaching a thick acrylic or other plastic panel that covers the interior of the glass and is firmly screwed to the door. The edges can then be covered with molding. Such plastics are shatter resistant. While they can be broken, they will not yield to the tools of most casual home intruders (unless they carry sledge hammers or blow ...


6

Here are some options: Use another door Go out a window so you can dig out the door Call someone who can come over and dig you out Hole up and wait for the snow to melt.


5

With those rough opening sizes, I would have stepped up the door sizes a bit, 32" in a 34" r.o., and 38" in a 40" r.o. You need some space to plumb and level, but 4" is overkill. I tend to install the door as close as possible on the hinge side to the framing (shimming it out for plumb and possibly raising it a bit to keep the top level). I also use a few 3" ...


5

In most cases, snow is not a solid substance. It is powder so it has a bit of movement. What you have to do it push the door a little bit open, and close it repeatably. From this you will hopefully be able to get your hand out the door to clear more snow. From that you can then open it even more. Repeat this process until you can fit a shovel out to ...


5

Depending on the exact sliding hardware you are using, it should be possible. Hollow core doors usually have a solid wood frame along the edges, though how far into the core this frame extends may vary. If you are using hardware like that shown below, you would need to make sure that the brackets attached to the wheels are anchored into the solid wood ...


3

Assuming this is an interior door, I'd just scribe the top of the door parallel with the top of the jamb and plane it to the line. It actually looks a tad out of square and a bit tight in the jamb.


3

DO NOT BUILD THIS PROJECT. It is not safe. I am leaving the description here for now to retain the comments. For a safe version of the Jack&Jill bathroom project see my other answer, that begins with "I think I understand all the requirements:" Shop for "Electric Bolt Locks (Fail Safe)". These sell for about $40 to $500 but you certainly don't need the ...


3

I think I understand all the requirements: The natural action when leaving the bathroom is to turn one of the doorknobs and open the door. For safety reasons this action, without any other required motions, must allow egress from the room under any and all conditions. (Thanks Wolf Harper) Also, to solve the specified problem, opening the door this way, ...


2

Nearly any door can be broken with minimal effort. The vulnerabilities are numerous. You are correct in identifying glass as one of them, but even with no glass, kicking in the door at the lock is another easy method unless the strike plate has been replaced with a special thick steel high-security model. Hinges can be another vulnerability if they're only ...


2

I'll assume it's the normal use-case of basically honest people trying to avoid "whoops, sorry, didn't know you were in there". Locks must always allow exit, so deadbolts are out. I'd look for alternate solutions: Electric strikes (retractable door-jambs), which secure with the bathroom light on. Now leave the privacy locks on both doors locked all the ...


2

I doubt the snow is so compacted that you cannot open the door at all. You don't have a huge ice-cube out of your door. So, just open the door as much as you can and dig your path clean.


2

It would be a mistake to install any window or door tightly in the framing. Houses move, and units installed tightly can get bound up and/or damaged. Your window should be installed level and square by shimming the bottom and sides. It's usually best to not shim the top in case the framing above settles. The rough opening should be about 1 inch larger than ...


2

Based on your excellent diagram, I think these may be your ticket. They are designed for your very problem. Disclaimer: I've never bought anything from the site in the link and I'm not endorsing them. The Stoppa


2

As @jphi618 indicates in his comment, glass or sheet acrylic would be thin, fairly strong and fairly cheap, then painted to match the door. There is also sheet steel, which would be much heavier and expensive, but similar in thickness. There are other materials, such as sheet MDF and plywood that are available in 1/4 inch thickness and hardboard that is ...


1

A few screws will not compromise the structural integrity of the door. A few hundred wouldn't, either. Insulation value will not be substantially altered. Most of that is in the foam, which will only lose a fraction of a percent in volume. Any fire protection the door provides is intended to protect from the garage. It's unlikely that a few small holes ...


1

I would look in to magnets. I recently purchased a magnet and hook to hang a Christmas wreath. It was about $5. It is strong enough that the easiest way to remove it is to slide it off the edge. I checked Amazon has them rated for 8 lbs.


1

The molding that holds the glass in place probably is held in place with small nails. Just gently pry up the molding with a wide (1" or even wider) wood chisel or screwdriver. Try not to dent the molding so you can reuse it. The wider the tip of the tool you use to pry it up, the less likely it is that you will damage the molding. Remove the old glass and ...


1

I think you might be going about this the wrong way. I saw in comments on your question about using a double-cylinder deadbolt on your front and rear entry doors. This is a bad idea, and may even violate local building codes, depending on whether your state/county/local authority has adopted the International Residential Code(IRC). According to the above ...


1

Polycarbonate is used for bulletproof glass in passenger trains. You don't have to worry about cinder blocks coming at you at 125 mph, so you don't need it 7/16” thick. Does the door have a normal glass panel in addition to the stained glass? If so, replace with polycarbonate. If not, alter the window molding to fit it. Nobody but you will even know it's ...


1

Both sensors will show a light if they're 1) connected correctly, and 2) sending and receiving the beam because they're in alignment. The lights may be different colors. This is normal. If one is out, first check alignment. There are often wingnut adjusters allowing you to swivel and tilt the sensors. They don't have to be perfectly aligned, but they need ...


1

The problem of soundproofing is a very small hole in the soundproofing lets lots of noise thru. If for instance the track the sliding door travels has a felt strip or thin rubber strip along its length, that will let lots of sound thru as it is mostly air or very thin. Keep that in mind. Doors typically have an air gap under them that allows air from the ...



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