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4

Sounds more like a case for a doorstop -- either wedge style, or flip-down, or (what's becoming my personal favorite) magnetic -- to hold the door open rather than arguing with the latch. And that would leave you with the option of closing the door if you ever have houseguests or other reasons to do so.


3

Aluminum is heat conductive and sweats in the wintertime as moist, warm inside air hits it. Despite drainage built into the frame, the water also condenses on the outside of the frames and can rot out the wood that forms the rough opening. Foam sealant will help eliminate the air spaces that allow this to happen but doesn't stop any exposed surface from ...


3

When I was growing up, we just stuffed whatever we could find (paper, plastic, etc) into the latch hole to fill it up. That would probably work for you. I didn't come up with the stuff to keep the door from latching, and I didn't make it better. <-- Lame 3M joke.


2

I would bet the doors were dryer than they are now. Most basements are more humid than the rest of a typical home, especially in the summer. In the winter they will shrink again, but it will be needed to trim a little here and there to get them to work in the summer.


2

Some jurisdictions, such as New York City, require self-closing, self-locking doors to the entry of multiple family dwellings (,8 or more units), but do not seem to require them on smaller housing units (such as one or two family homes) or on the individual apartments within a larger unit. Even when locks are required, they do not need to be in the knob of ...


2

If you just want the bathroom door held closed, remove the latch mechanism totally, install a dummy knob and use a magnetic closure to hold the door in place. You do not even need the magnet to touch the matched plate on the stronger ones. If you are using a bit of foam or a vinyl bumper on the door itself, adjust the magnet back from the plate until it is ...


1

A piece of tape over the latch hole, or the latch itself would prevent the latch from catching. You could also remove the latch from the door, and replace it when you move out.


1

I had two doors that would stick, a hand plane was much more effective then sanding. If you do not have one buy an Empire Pocket plane, they are around 10 dollars and just as effective.


1

A door/knob that is set properly will make very little noise during normal operation. The noise caused by the door hitting the jamb is almost certainly a function of misalignment (i.e. the door is striking the jamb stop at only one location). When properly hung the tight tolerances will trap air as the door closes and create a natural cushioning effect. ...


1

The quick fix is to install a diagonal cable/turnbuckle assembly from the swinging lower corner (where the vertical lock stile meets the lower cross-rail) up to the opposite corner (where the hinge stile meets the top cross-rail) and tighten the turnbuckle until the door is more square. The other fix it to rebuild the door and tighten, glue up and clamp all ...


1

Plans for a screen door were published in the August 2010 issue of Woodworker's Journal, if that helps at all. Try libraries and/or see if you can find someone who'd lend you their copy.


1

I used an install jig with a hole saw to open up the hole for the bolt on my metal security door. It is a little tricky but putting the hole saw in the jig for the handle/ lockset and securing with duct tape to keep it from vibrating out worked pretty well at keeping the jig lined up while the hole saw bit into the steel. This is always done knowing you ...



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