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4

I would suggest a quick visit to any building supply recycling type place near you to see if you can simply grab an inexpensive replacement door that's already better suited to installing a pet-door in - you may have structural issues with this door if you cut away a significant part of the bottom to insert a pet door. Replacing glass panels with wood is not ...


4

The idea of removing the glass and replacing with wood is reasonably practical. Since the glass is relatively thin you would need to replace with a relatively thin wood piece. I would think that 1/4" or maybe 3/8" thick plywood would be able to be used in place of the glass. There are a number of things to consider though before embarking on this approach. ...


3

I would suggest that since you intend (and should) attach the frame to the subfloor that it will be much better to install the frame first. Then fit the flooring up to the frame.


3

I'd drill the existing screw head off, use a bit slightly larger than the shaft of the screw but smaller than the hole in the knob. The stripped out screw should keep the bit fairly centered even when used at a slight angle. Once each head is removed you can pull the knob and try a screw extractor on what's left, but there's a good chance you'll need to ...


2

Please keep in mind that headers are made to absorb some of the twist and vibration when someone decides a door needs to be slammed, leaned against to keep out little/big brother/sister, and other abuse. I would build as you suggested, and if it becomes a wall cracking/splitting issue near the door frame, then make a header with a double 2x4 or 2x6 instead ...


2

Just to add what Ecnerwal is saying - and he is 100% correct - I often use pocket doors in basements with lower clearance. You can screw pocket door frame directly to the joists and save and inch or two.


2

This is perfectly fine. There is in fact a whole building science based protocol for not using double top plates or double studs even on structural walls. If the name comes back to me I'll provide a link to it. Advanced Framing. Developed 40+ years ago and still not accepted by half the carpenters who learned from daddy who learned from daddy who...learned ...


2

If its open its going to be easier to break in whether its 1cm or 4inches. A security gate always did wonders for us in South Africa, pretty sure in many other countries too. TIP: When you install the security gate, make sure that it cannot be screwed out from its sockets, form the OUTSIDE. Or tampered with in any other way from the outside.


2

Given that some spelunkers (cavers) manage to squeeze through 6-7" cracks, 4" seems about right (and make sure that an arm, perhaps longer than your own, or holding a tool such as @Matthew's wire, can't reach in far enough to defeat the lock - which would be one reason to go even smaller.) You also need to be careful about creating a trap for yourself - ...


2

What you should have done, and should start by doing, is check whether this lockset will let you remove the inner knob. Cheaper ones often won't, but more expensive ones will have the same kind of release as on the outer knob -- rotate the thumbturn to the unlocked position, depress the rectangular catch below the knob shaft's surface, and pull the knob off. ...


2

Depends on how big of a gap that you have that is currently being shimmed but yes this would be the easiest thing to do. I would make sure that you have at least 3/16" gap at all points before doing this. Note: Just to be clear you should be using the new jams in this door. At the very least you need to use the hinge side but preferably both. After you ...


1

Doors don't get replaced that often! It's much quicker, easier and less messy to make the door fit. It can be planed down - 30 mins will do with a hand plane, or 10 with a power plane.You're adjusting one thing, not at least two. An ordinary saw will rip 1/4" off if you clamp something straight along the side to follow.It's a sledgehammer to crack a ...


1

This idea to make a big modification to a door jamb just to avoid trimming a door is crazy. If you try to move this crazy idea forward and pound the jamb side over 1/4" you will find that you have compromised the upper corner of the jamb on that side. The upper joint of a jamb is usually a rabbet joint and this will completely separate when you force it ...


1

The use of two jack studs under each end of the header could have been done for any number of reasons. If the header supports a lot of weight from above it may have been deemed desirable to have the extra support on each end. If the header has an long span it is sometimes desirable to add additional support for the header. As you suggested it is possible ...


1

The part name isn't relevant at this point as Baldwin has re-engineered the part. If you have an older one call their tech support and explain the problem and they will send you a conversion kit that will fix the problem.



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