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35

Just some notes: This is just plain lazy. Maybe he forgot but forgetting = lazy. Maybe he ran out of screws. But these are basically the most common type of door screws so again that goes back to being lazy. When installing doors it is best practice to get at least one screw per hinge all the way into the actual framing of the wall. This requires some ...


6

The reason for a rough opening is so that it CAN be rough in dimensions. Your opening should be no problem. Rough openings are made larger to accommodate headers and floors than out of level, adjacent studs that may be out of plumb, framing lumber that has thickness variations, openings that are slightly out of square and maybe some other things I've not ...


4

You should check the hinges, and make sure the screws are tight and that the hinges are not worn out. Evidence of a worn out hinge will be that the door hangs at an angle, which is likely to be visible along the top of the shut door. If the door appears to be crooked, or if it wobbles when you lift it, then you should replace the hinges before moving making ...


4

The door comes already attached to the frame, with all those screws you see. These are rather short screws as they can't be longer than the thickness of the frame, since it's an assembled unit. The missing screw on the frame side is to be a long screw. That goes through the frame, through any surface material in the hole in the wall, and into the structural ...


2

There's a built-in gap in the height and width of the opening. so trimmer/king plumb parallel to the wall's length isn't crucial (to a degree). It's far more critical to get the wall itself plumb perpendicular to the rough opening. Nearly everything else can be shimmed out later, assuming reasonably accurate dimensions. Using a level of adequate length (to ...


2

Generally for interior doors the RO (Rough Opening) is 2 inches wider than the door slab. This gives 3/4" for the jamb and 1/4" of 'play' for each side, for you to adjust the jamb to make the door operate properly. So if you've got 29 13/16 instead of 30, you'll end up with a little over 1/4 of play total instead of 1/2. Still should be plenty if your jacks ...


2

There are a lot of options you could consider depending on your budget and opinion on "cheap". There are acoustic dampening windows you could look into if you have a higher budget and don't mind replacing your window. If you're sure that the main source of noise penetration is through the window, which is to be expected, then this might be the best / most ...


1

You do need to have a primer for sure. Just a tip from someone who paints 20+ metal doors a year. Use automotive spray paint. Cost a couple bucks more and you can pick it up at local parts store or online. The colors are better, then finish is better, and they make some great looking clear coats. Two coats of apple red auto paint + 2 coats of clear ...


1

Clean it well and then sand at 400 grit or rougher to give the surface some roughness so the new paint can adhere. Don't go too rouch or else the scratches will show through. You can go as low as 80 grit if you use a fill primer before painting. I'd say 220 to 400 if you don't plan on using a primer. Check the directions on the paint you plan to use - they ...


1

I have very good results filling lock bores and hinge mortises on doors, and latch holes in jambs, using 2 part wood filler. It's polyester resin filler similar to automobile body filler: bonds tightly, easily shaped with "cheese grater" planes and sandpaper, cures hard, will not shrink, can be drilled/screwed into/chiseled, etc. Works great as long as you ...


1

1/8th" Luaun plywood from the big box store and a good chisel should let you cut out very tight fitting patch pieces with some practice. That'll get it into paint shape. For a stain finish, you would have to try to match the grain and color, which would be a bit harder.


1

You can't (practically speaking) make your slabs thinner. It would be a monumental undertaking considering the nature of hollow-core doors and symmetrical mortising. You can either move the stops or get new slabs and start over. To move the stops, slice the paint with a utility knife, then work a steel putty knife behind the stop to loosen it. Gently pry ...


1

I think it's a push latch or a push to close latch for sliding doors- like the one pictured below:



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