Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

9

Remove the pins from the hinges. You should then be able to pivot the door out of the opening. Once the door is removed you can remove the screws that hold in the strike bolt.


5

Try #2: Cyanoacrylate This worked much better. The local hardwood distributor recommended and carries super thin "super glue". Turn the knob in the usual direction to set it tight, then apply glue to the glass/metal junction (it will wick right inside). Keep acetone handy in case you dribble. Scrape excess off with a small screwdriver. Done. What will ...


4

According to the International Building Code, door knobs should be between 34" - 48" above the finished floor. International Building Code 2012 Chapter 10 Means of Egress Section 1008 Doors, Gates and Turnstiles 1008.1.9.2 Hardware height. Door handles, pulls, latches, locks and other operating devices shall be installed 34 inches (864 ...


4

Try #1: Liquefied MDI adhesive. For my first attempt I assembled hot water, a thermometer, glue, Diphenylmethane Diisocyanate (MDI) glue, and a straw. The MDI is a thick glue, so the trick was making it thin enough without creating toxic fumes: Used a straw to extend the tip of the glue bottle. Heated water to 120F to liquefy the glue in the bottle. ...


3

You might want to investigate rim locks. These are decorative/antique styles, but there may be more utilitarian ones if that is what you want.


2

Normally anything that has keys that come with it is meant for outdoor use. And almost all of these are made from non corrosive metals. I can't think of any house that I have ever looked at that had a rusted out door knob and everything else was in good shape.


2

Polyurethane Foam. The type that is used for insulation. Remove the door, remove knob and screw Tape rear hole to contain foam. Lay door flat Enlarge knob hole to allow dispensing wand to fit. (If this enlargment is too close to the knob base size, this method won't work) Dispense foam into hole. Probably a 3-4 second burst will be enough After curing ...


2

If you just want the bathroom door held closed, remove the latch mechanism totally, install a dummy knob and use a magnetic closure to hold the door in place. You do not even need the magnet to touch the matched plate on the stronger ones. If you are using a bit of foam or a vinyl bumper on the door itself, adjust the magnet back from the plate until it is ...


2

Looks close enough to me (buy two, do both sides). Also, consider swapping a new one with the inner knob from one of the closets or any other less conspicuous door. If you don't like this one, search Google (not suppliers) with these key words: Beaded Oval Door Knob: (rejuvenation.com)


2

I don't think it makes much difference. Assuming no disability (you are opening the door with a fully working hand, not a stick or your foot, or unable to grip things), the first option (curved up) is a bit easier to open. In the first image, I would grab the handle with my left hand, with my wrist starting slightly rotated clockwise, and rotate it ...


1

The upper deadbolt is still locked in the picture. Once it is unlocked, simply either use a screwdriver to pull the striker inwards, or use the old credit card trick we all learned in middle school to push the latch in from the outside.


1

That door originally had a mortise lock and I'm assuming this is in an old building. It looks like someone custom made an adapter plate to put a modern bored cylindrical lock in as a replacement. You can either find a replacement mortise lock (just do a google search and you will find lots of sites that have replacement hardware). Or you can go with your ...


1

Go with plan B. The larger strike looks like either of two things, a reinforcement for a damaged mount for the strike bolt. The door slab looks ever so slightly thicker at the strike location, like the screws somehow split the door at the strike. Or the door originally had a mortise lock set and this part serves as an adapter so to get a standard knob to ...


1

This is an old style knob that screws onto it's turning bar, and then is locked into place. Simply apply some extra force and turn the knob counter clockwise to loosen until it comes off.


1

Aha! It's a "Sargent". Found the answer here http://youtu.be/VyzTw5l-xhs Thank you, Internet!


1

Thanks for all of the answers. After bringing the door knob to Home Depot, I ended up buying #8-32 x 1" brass round-head machine screws, which worked perfectly.


1

You can easily install modern locks into an old door, but that would be an awful thing to do, in my opinion. It would really not look appropriate in an old house. Check eBay, craigslist and local flea markets - you can easily find old mortise lock parts(often in big lots) Sometimes it might even be new old stock. Those parts would be of much higher quality ...


1

Going off my comment earlier, one example would be a Walk-in Safety Latch. The specification of a safety latch is Where there is a possibility of entrapment within a latched enclosure, safety standards require the use of a latch or handle fitted with an inside release mechanism. Latches without this feature are intended for use only on small ...


1

Locksets (including doornobs) are intended for either interior or exterior use. Some may be rated for both. There are some differences in configuration (such as deadbolt vs. privacy lock) and differences in durability and sealing. Doorknobs and locksets intended for interior use may have no water seal and may use a thinner protective coating. Doorknobs and ...


1

If the latch plate is flush with the door edge, the set back is correct. The flat back (faces street for out swinging doors) must be able to extend into the strike plate to hold door. Many alignment issues crop up to pull those 2 edges apart. Door gaps tell what has happened to its alignment over time. up/down misalign due to top hinge pulling away from ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible