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Look for something called an automatic door sweep. These are devices that have a spring loaded sweep which raises when the door is opened. When the door is closed a cam is activated which drops the sweep.


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A 'door sock' will do the trick. A tight cold room can also introduce an abundance of condensation development inside the wall cavity leading to mold growth.


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Google "bottom mount door sweep" for any number of inconspicuous options. It appears that your gap is roughly 3/4", which should be fairly easy to fill. Really, though, I'd investigate why an interior door has so much airflow around it. A window a/c unit should have no trouble keeping up in a single bedroom. You should be able to see your breath.


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You removed one side of the jamb, and replaced it with new construction. But, there are 2 problems. the jamb is bowing; the jamb is not deep enough. The old jambs were 5 1/4" and fit perfectly since you have plaster instead of drywall. The new jams are 4 1/2" since they are assuming drywall. Those 2 problems are separate and should be treated as such ...


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It appears to me you have a brick exterior and a 2x4 wall that gives you a thicker wall. At the very least, you need a jamb for 2x6 walls. That may be wide enough to fit. Then follow the instructions for proper installation. Good,luck!


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Jamb is installed poorly. This installation illustration may be helpful to you... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ICYwPa5_bFY


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no - the jamb should be level and square, with the jamb being parallel to the door on all four sides. gap should be about 1/8" on the top, hinge side and strike side, and about 1/4" on the bottom. make sure the sill is dead flat and level first. this is critical for long life. the trick is to mount the hinge side first, then the top, then the strike. ...


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It's the carpenter's responsibility to properly shim and anchor any door jamb. Unless it's a rigid steel commercial unit, it's not designed to be self-supporting. I usually shim behind each hinge on the hinge side, and at four locations, including the latch position, on the latch side. Use a combination of wedge and flat shims. For an exterior door I ...



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