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7

Not worth the time and effort. Replace the door.


7

I would try applying some wood glue into the split with a small brush. Sandwich the door between two 2x4's with some clamps. It may help to put some wax paper on the 2x4 to keep any glue from adhering the board to the door. Tighten the clamps until the glue starts to squeeze from the crack. Let it sit 24 hours, remove the clamps and scrape any excess dried ...


3

You could put some shims/wood filler/bondo in there, but it's 90% cosmetic. (The remaining 10% is that it would resist an attack with a prybar, but realistically, if someone is coming at your door with a prybar, you're doomed.) The screws (assuming they're long enough to bite solidly into the framing), will do what they're supposed to do with or without ...


2

Reminder: If you want that to provide any real security against kick-in, the "bolt" (I'd call it a hasp, but never mind) needs to be firmly secured not just to the door trim but into the stud behind it. 3" screws are seriously worth considering. In any case, the screws you use for this should have thread stopping a bit before the screw head (with the ...


2

Did you pre-drill the holes for the screws? It seems as though the screws have hit something solid (screw/nail head, etc). Which is causing the molding to be pushed away, instead of the screws penetrating deeper into the wall. This might be a sign that the hardware is only held in place by the molding, which isn't going to be very secure. You'll want to ...


2

A heavy or multi-layered or heavy multi-layered curtain would attenuate sound as well as many doors, and seems about right for this "wall" as described. Sandwich a blanket (or more than one) between more decorative surface layers.


1

If the bottom of the jamb is loose, shim behind it and fasten with a long screw. (Use the gap of the door to set the amount of shimming. If the screw draws the jamb in too much, back the screw out and push the shims in further.) Then, get a chunk of wood matching the jamb. I'm guessing 4-1/2" x 3/4" thick, by a few inches tall. Cut the new piece ...


1

Even when swept clean I would not consider that a properly prepared surface for a threshold. Just the nature of the uneven surface of those filled concrete blocks would make water tend to collect underneath. You should use a concrete patch/resurfacer to create a smooth level (or slightly sloped away from the opening) surface, then attach the threshold per ...


1

Having a picture would be good. If ivy is growing there, it means it is getting water somehow, which is bad. Just cutting the visible part will not fix the critical problem, which is the water supply. When ivy grows it creates a thick mat of small roots and veins that make sort of a carpet in the floor of the area. This mat has to receive water for the ivy ...


1

If you like (I do this sometimes for big gaps), try to find a piece of plywood exactly the right thickness for the gap behind the deadbolt. Drill thru the jamb and plywood and you may want a pilot hole in the framing. You may need to hollow out a bit of the plywood to fit the bolt of the deadbolt. This will be more secure, but the 3-inch screws and heavy ...


1

My father in law put a mirror up on both sides of an opening between a formal dinning room & the foyer. You could easily put some foam insulation in between the mirrors on both sides. You may not want a mirror in the living room in which case I might suggest a piece of wood that you paint that color. If you want the opening to stay usable then a door is ...


1

If those screws are only 1" long, then that security latch doesn't give you much security. In order to provide any semblance of security, the screws need to be firmly attached to a stud. It looks like those screws only go into the door jamb, which is probably only 3/4 thick and unable to handle a 3 1/2" screw. If your screws do not have an unthreaded ...


1

Well the big thing you're going to notice is just humidity will change it a lot. If you want a door that closes properly year round, then the best time would be when it is not too humid, or not too dry (i.e spring would be fine). This way when it gets humid or dry, you minimize the amount of warping the frame goes through


1

Sometimes the problem is a misaligned strike, especially if thick weatherstripping was added since the door was installed but it can happen for other reasons. I've patched that on multiple doorframes...


1

I had a door with many of the same issues. It turned out that the previous owner had done a shoddy job of door installation. The first step I would recommend is to check the door to ensure that it is square. IF the door was not hung correctly, it could cause many of the issues you described. It may not be the door itself but the door frame. If the door ...


1

Assuming that the 3 2x8s will work for you - and it sounds right for your situation then you are fine with adding some sort of plywood to make your header flush. However I usually (given I have the space) would throw down a 2x6 flat on top of the 2x8s that are on the jacks (yes you must have jacks for your header). This gives good reference points for top ...


1

Longer screws in old houses won't work, you will just hit plaster. Pull casing, cut out bad, new block of wood to fill cut out, longer piece slid behind new piece between jamb and stud creating overlap on top and bottom.


1

If there is a gap on the hinge side and tightening the hinge screws does not close the gap, then swap one of the hinge screws for a longer construction screw. The construction screw will be long enough to grab the 2x4 behind the frame of the door and will close the gap. Just be slow to tighten it just enough to fix the door and not pull the door frame ...



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