Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

Not worth the time and effort. Replace the door.


7

I would try applying some wood glue into the split with a small brush. Sandwich the door between two 2x4's with some clamps. It may help to put some wax paper on the 2x4 to keep any glue from adhering the board to the door. Tighten the clamps until the glue starts to squeeze from the crack. Let it sit 24 hours, remove the clamps and scrape any excess dried ...


4

Now that I've seen the photos, it's clear to me that at least the jack studs should be replaced; fortunately, their replacement should be fairly easy. The one on the latch side could be replaced by a 4x4, but it should have a tiny "sill plate" attached to half its bottom end with contruction adhesive because otherwise it'll overhang the existing sill plate. ...


2

The recommended rough opening for a 36" x 80" door, is 38 1/2" x 82". So you're basically looking at something like this. Basically, you'll have to fill the purple area with framing. Which means you might have to either use thin planks on the sides, or cut into the walls to install framing. The rough opening (blue) around the jamb (brown) will be left ...


2

I would bet the doors were dryer than they are now. Most basements are more humid than the rest of a typical home, especially in the summer. In the winter they will shrink again, but it will be needed to trim a little here and there to get them to work in the summer.


2

I personally do not think a PVC cement will give satisfactory results. I would probably: 1) find a thin gauge aluminum channel that fits over the broken frame, deep enough to cover the gouge, spray paint it to match, and silicone it down over the length of the frame. Or, 2) use automotive body filler, plane and sand to blend, than spray prime and paint the ...


2

Reminder: If you want that to provide any real security against kick-in, the "bolt" (I'd call it a hasp, but never mind) needs to be firmly secured not just to the door trim but into the stud behind it. 3" screws are seriously worth considering. In any case, the screws you use for this should have thread stopping a bit before the screw head (with the ...


2

Did you pre-drill the holes for the screws? It seems as though the screws have hit something solid (screw/nail head, etc). Which is causing the molding to be pushed away, instead of the screws penetrating deeper into the wall. This might be a sign that the hardware is only held in place by the molding, which isn't going to be very secure. You'll want to ...


1

Well the big thing you're going to notice is just humidity will change it a lot. If you want a door that closes properly year round, then the best time would be when it is not too humid, or not too dry (i.e spring would be fine). This way when it gets humid or dry, you minimize the amount of warping the frame goes through


1

If those screws are only 1" long, then that security latch doesn't give you much security. In order to provide any semblance of security, the screws need to be firmly attached to a stud. It looks like those screws only go into the door jamb, which is probably only 3/4 thick and unable to handle a 3 1/2" screw. If your screws do not have an unthreaded ...


1

I had two doors that would stick, a hand plane was much more effective then sanding. If you do not have one buy an Empire Pocket plane, they are around 10 dollars and just as effective.


1

Testor101 is correct in both points. Coping this joint with the coping saw is the way it was most likely done when it was built. It does allow for a corner to be a bit of out of square, but doing this will be taxing on the blade of a coping saw, it is a lot of wood to cut through. But it can be done with patience. Trying to rush through a cut this size will ...


1

I am not sure what your exact situation is but I did something very similar in my last house. We had a hallway that led to 4 bedrooms. The kitchen was right by the entrance to the hallway so it became very noisy. Again I was right around the same dimensions as you too - think mine was about 38" wide. What I did was install a pocket door. These come in ...


1

Longer screws in old houses won't work, you will just hit plaster. Pull casing, cut out bad, new block of wood to fill cut out, longer piece slid behind new piece between jamb and stud creating overlap on top and bottom.


1

If there is a gap on the hinge side and tightening the hinge screws does not close the gap, then swap one of the hinge screws for a longer construction screw. The construction screw will be long enough to grab the 2x4 behind the frame of the door and will close the gap. Just be slow to tighten it just enough to fix the door and not pull the door frame ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible