Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

The short answer is longer screws, plus some glue. There should be plenty of extra room for longer screws on both the door and the jamb. If the hinges are brass, solid brass screws are best. Pre-drill. At the same time stick in a small strip of wood soaked in wood glue into each hole just to be sure. Toothpicks, chopsticks or similar dry wood work well. ...


4

Reline your jamb with another material that you can screw into. The pressure you will subject the door frame to is really needing something screwed into it. To just use pressure has the strong possibility of deforming or worse, cracking your jamb, depends on where the shims are placed behind the jamb, but you cant see them, unless you take it apart, not a ...


2

You dont state what your problem is. You can install the door to the outside of the door frame. It looks like the top sticks out farther than the sides so you either have to add a board the thickness of the distance to the outside of the side frame. If you need more room for the frame flange at the top you can add a 1x2 board to the top of the door . With ...


2

Close the door but don't force it. mark where it contacts the jamb. Use the electric planer or sander to take it down to where you think it will close nicely. Repeat until you have it closing nicely with an even reveal all the way around. Then paint the door. Good as new. sanding block or hand planer will work but will be much more labor intensive. I ...


2

Since you say that the wood under the hinge and around the hinge screw holes has split and gone soft it pays to check the wood of the door jamb adjacent to the hinge mount location as well. If the wood there is not sound then you are likely looking forward to some more serious repair such as replacement of the jamb side board or the whole jamb. If the ...


2

In both cases there is no doubt that the structure around both walls and thus the corresponding floors and foundation are moving around. Besides the door top to frame fit another real visible proof shows by the opening of the trim miter joint on the bedroom door. The crack above the door frame corner of the same door shows this too. If this has been a ...


1

Most units are prehung. If the mortises on the jam and door look perfect and fit precisely, it is usually a prehung. Unless the situation is intolerable, I'd give it a while and let conditions change before making drastic changes to the door or hinge sets. I suspect possible settling or drastic humidity or temperature related expansion to the frame. You ...


1

Although MDF is more stable than solid wood, I won't claim that it will not swell enough with enough humidity to break the joints at the corners as solid wood will if there is no room for expansion, did that my self with a single panel in a 24" cabinet door 20 years ago never again... The strength of the door needs to be in the joinery, not the panel. There ...


1

It's a bit hard to say what is causing the noise without an onsite inspection. Why not just try to muffle it (unless you are concerned about a structural problem). Consider small bumpers, either vinyl, cork or felt, something like these These are all self-stick and any of them could be put on the top and/or bottom edge of the strike side of the door ...


1

You did not supply actual dimensions for the new door size, new frame rough opening size, or the old frame internal dimensions. As such it is difficult to give specific advice. That said here are some basic suggestions. 1) Before fitting the new frame within the old frame do remove the doorstop molding from the old frame. 2) Remove any and all casing from ...


1

Routing and a bit of chiseling at the corners and the bottoms of the 2 legs shouldn't be too expensive if hired. Good time to buy and learn to use a router. The transom is a bit tight, so you might need a rabbet plane or a oscillating multitool. Just get a accurate drawing of what size rough opening the storm door wants. Alternatively, you could attach ...


1

The difficulty here is extending the door casing's pattern so that it nearly touches the tile. A stylistic device which helps with this problem is the plinth block which you simply install in place of a removed section of the moulding. In your case, plinth blocks address what to do about the outward-facing door casing. The remaining issue to deal with is ...


1

The usual approach is to cut a thin strip of the same jamb and moldings and glue into place. You can also fill in small spots with an epoxy based product like Bondo or other paste-like filler (would not use it for thicker vertical surfaces since it may slump). It can be carved and sanded like a hard wood. A combination of these techniques should give you a ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible