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7

Not worth the time and effort. Replace the door.


7

I would try applying some wood glue into the split with a small brush. Sandwich the door between two 2x4's with some clamps. It may help to put some wax paper on the 2x4 to keep any glue from adhering the board to the door. Tighten the clamps until the glue starts to squeeze from the crack. Let it sit 24 hours, remove the clamps and scrape any excess dried ...


4

Now that I've seen the photos, it's clear to me that at least the jack studs should be replaced; fortunately, their replacement should be fairly easy. The one on the latch side could be replaced by a 4x4, but it should have a tiny "sill plate" attached to half its bottom end with contruction adhesive because otherwise it'll overhang the existing sill plate. ...


3

You could put some shims/wood filler/bondo in there, but it's 90% cosmetic. (The remaining 10% is that it would resist an attack with a prybar, but realistically, if someone is coming at your door with a prybar, you're doomed.) The screws (assuming they're long enough to bite solidly into the framing), will do what they're supposed to do with or without ...


2

I personally do not think a PVC cement will give satisfactory results. I would probably: 1) find a thin gauge aluminum channel that fits over the broken frame, deep enough to cover the gouge, spray paint it to match, and silicone it down over the length of the frame. Or, 2) use automotive body filler, plane and sand to blend, than spray prime and paint the ...


2

Did you pre-drill the holes for the screws? It seems as though the screws have hit something solid (screw/nail head, etc). Which is causing the molding to be pushed away, instead of the screws penetrating deeper into the wall. This might be a sign that the hardware is only held in place by the molding, which isn't going to be very secure. You'll want to ...


2

Reminder: If you want that to provide any real security against kick-in, the "bolt" (I'd call it a hasp, but never mind) needs to be firmly secured not just to the door trim but into the stud behind it. 3" screws are seriously worth considering. In any case, the screws you use for this should have thread stopping a bit before the screw head (with the ...


2

A heavy or multi-layered or heavy multi-layered curtain would attenuate sound as well as many doors, and seems about right for this "wall" as described. Sandwich a blanket (or more than one) between more decorative surface layers.


1

Having a picture would be good. If ivy is growing there, it means it is getting water somehow, which is bad. Just cutting the visible part will not fix the critical problem, which is the water supply. When ivy grows it creates a thick mat of small roots and veins that make sort of a carpet in the floor of the area. This mat has to receive water for the ivy ...


1

My father in law put a mirror up on both sides of an opening between a formal dinning room & the foyer. You could easily put some foam insulation in between the mirrors on both sides. You may not want a mirror in the living room in which case I might suggest a piece of wood that you paint that color. If you want the opening to stay usable then a door is ...


1

If you like (I do this sometimes for big gaps), try to find a piece of plywood exactly the right thickness for the gap behind the deadbolt. Drill thru the jamb and plywood and you may want a pilot hole in the framing. You may need to hollow out a bit of the plywood to fit the bolt of the deadbolt. This will be more secure, but the 3-inch screws and heavy ...


1

Longer screws in old houses won't work, you will just hit plaster. Pull casing, cut out bad, new block of wood to fill cut out, longer piece slid behind new piece between jamb and stud creating overlap on top and bottom.


1

Well the big thing you're going to notice is just humidity will change it a lot. If you want a door that closes properly year round, then the best time would be when it is not too humid, or not too dry (i.e spring would be fine). This way when it gets humid or dry, you minimize the amount of warping the frame goes through


1

If those screws are only 1" long, then that security latch doesn't give you much security. In order to provide any semblance of security, the screws need to be firmly attached to a stud. It looks like those screws only go into the door jamb, which is probably only 3/4 thick and unable to handle a 3 1/2" screw. If your screws do not have an unthreaded ...


1

If there is a gap on the hinge side and tightening the hinge screws does not close the gap, then swap one of the hinge screws for a longer construction screw. The construction screw will be long enough to grab the 2x4 behind the frame of the door and will close the gap. Just be slow to tighten it just enough to fix the door and not pull the door frame ...



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