Hot answers tagged

9

Properly installed, at least some of the screws should go thru frame and into studs. The short screws are mostly there to keep everything aligned while a pre-hung door-and-frame set is assembled and shipped. Once it has been hung and shimmed properly, those screws can be replaced with better ones... but aren't always.


9

You could just chill out. Putting up bars or plastic on that door is truly ghetto. Doors like this are not inherently unsafe at all. Your door is appropriate for your neighborhood. Your door would be unsafe or inappropriate for a bad neighborhood or an apartment building. Having this glass probably does not effect your chances of burglary by ....


8

You could consider attaching a thick acrylic or other plastic panel that covers the interior of the glass and is firmly screwed to the door. The edges can then be covered with molding. Such plastics are shatter resistant. While they can be broken, they will not yield to the tools of most casual home intruders (unless they carry sledge hammers or blow ...


6

The reason for a rough opening is so that it CAN be rough in dimensions. Your opening should be no problem. Rough openings are made larger to accommodate headers and floors than out of level, adjacent studs that may be out of plumb, framing lumber that has thickness variations, openings that are slightly out of square and maybe some other things I've not ...


4

I'm in agreement with ipe, but thought it was worth noting that the price for premanufactured ipe thresholds is currently 5 times that of oak. Oak is also good quality and often used for outside door jabs. Oak has a long history of surviving punishment. Although, if you build your own threshold you could save a lot that expense. Other notable woods are maple ...


4

whenever i build a custom exterior jamb, i use ipe. its stronger and harder than anything else you will find for exterior work, takes paint well, clears beautifully, and is a great wood in general. the biggest problem you will run into with exterior jambs is moisture related warpage. ipe wont warp. to be honest, i learned long ago the best way to do what ...


3

A door is held up by hinges in the jamb (the broad boards surrounding the door, perpendicular to the surface of the wall). The jamb is thin material, usually a little over 1/2 inch thick, but it is firmly nailed to the jack stud, which gives it rigidity, as does any casing added between the jamb and the wall. The header also sits on the jack stud. While you ...


2

Two minutes to mark the bottom of the door whether it be a 1/4" mark or a 1/2" mark up from the floor, 10 minutes to pull the door pins, 10 minutes to set up a workbench of a sort, and 20 minutes to cut it after you score the mark with a straight edge and razor knife and reset it in place. A little time spent for a long time reward. If the door does not ...


2

Almost any door should be hung plumb on both axes, level, and square. Not doing so results in undesirable movement due to gravity along with other adverse functional issues. In this case, I'd hang the door roughly centered in the opening using shims, then I'd apply casing on the outside to cover the uneven gaps. Optionally case the inside as well. I'd then ...


2

Google "bottom mount door sweep" for any number of inconspicuous options. It appears that your gap is roughly 3/4", which should be fairly easy to fill. Really, though, I'd investigate why an interior door has so much airflow around it. A window a/c unit should have no trouble keeping up in a single bedroom. You should be able to see your breath.


2

There's a built-in gap in the height and width of the opening. so trimmer/king plumb parallel to the wall's length isn't crucial (to a degree). It's far more critical to get the wall itself plumb perpendicular to the rough opening. Nearly everything else can be shimmed out later, assuming reasonably accurate dimensions. Using a level of adequate length (to ...


2

Generally for interior doors the RO (Rough Opening) is 2 inches wider than the door slab. This gives 3/4" for the jamb and 1/4" of 'play' for each side, for you to adjust the jamb to make the door operate properly. So if you've got 29 13/16 instead of 30, you'll end up with a little over 1/4 of play total instead of 1/2. Still should be plenty if your jacks ...


2

Nearly any door can be broken with minimal effort. The vulnerabilities are numerous. You are correct in identifying glass as one of them, but even with no glass, kicking in the door at the lock is another easy method unless the strike plate has been replaced with a special thick steel high-security model. Hinges can be another vulnerability if they're only ...


2

Purchase a 1" thick by 3 1/2" wide PVC trim to go around the 3 sides of the door. Ripping to width were it fit to a proper set back from the edge of the jamb in all areas below the masonry cap of the walls. In essence, trimming in out in a typical fashion the way interior doors are trimmed. A thinner trim would work but the thicker trim allows the back side ...


1

To do it right a new piece of trim that matches or 3 new ones around the inside would be a start. An over sized strike plate (the part the latch drops into) and a couple of longer screws to secure the strike plate. Then find a small flat blade screwdriver to keep close in case this happens again. Most of these doors have a small hole in the outside knob. ...


1

You removed one side of the jamb, and replaced it with new construction. But, there are 2 problems. the jamb is bowing; the jamb is not deep enough. The old jambs were 5 1/4" and fit perfectly since you have plaster instead of drywall. The new jams are 4 1/2" since they are assuming drywall. Those 2 problems are separate and should be treated as such ...


1

It appears to me you have a brick exterior and a 2x4 wall that gives you a thicker wall. At the very least, you need a jamb for 2x6 walls. That may be wide enough to fit. Then follow the instructions for proper installation. Good,luck!


1

It's the carpenter's responsibility to properly shim and anchor any door jamb. Unless it's a rigid steel commercial unit, it's not designed to be self-supporting. I usually shim behind each hinge on the hinge side, and at four locations, including the latch position, on the latch side. Use a combination of wedge and flat shims. For an exterior door I ...


1

Lots of over-thinking for your solution. Glass: Talk to your local window retailer about installing a shatter-resistant film on the glass. 3M and BurglarGARD films can prevent an intruder from breaking out the glass easily. Proper installation is a must. It's not as easy as adding window tint film. And an FYI: modern tempered glass for residential windows ...


1

I think you might be going about this the wrong way. I saw in comments on your question about using a double-cylinder deadbolt on your front and rear entry doors. This is a bad idea, and may even violate local building codes, depending on whether your state/county/local authority has adopted the International Residential Code(IRC). According to the above ...


1

Polycarbonate is used for bulletproof glass in passenger trains. You don't have to worry about cinder blocks coming at you at 125 mph, so you don't need it 7/16” thick. Does the door have a normal glass panel in addition to the stained glass? If so, replace with polycarbonate. If not, alter the window molding to fit it. Nobody but you will even know it's ...


1

You could run your PT plates across the doorway to begin with, then cut them out after the fact. (Predrill the plate and use tapcon style screws and you won't split even a short bit of plate.) The upside of this is that you'll have a straight line across the doorway. Build a wall on this with another bottom plate/studs/top plate and it's easy to plumb it. ...


1

Background Information There are really only four things necessary for mold growth: Mold Spores Mold Food (Organic Substance) Appropriate Temperatures Considerable Moisture Resources The best way to control mold growth, is to control moisture. One good resource available to you is the Brief Guide to Mold, Moisture and Your Home from the US EPA. The US ...


1

If the floor is level as you say, and the door is square (probably is) check the hinge jamb and see if it's plumb / square to the floor. If it isn't, you may be able to take the trim off, remove and replace the shims, and correct the problem without cutting the door.


1

The shims come ready made at lumber and big box stores or if you have one you can make them using a miter box and a 2X10 or the like. My miterbox is an old Hitachi slide compound. It can cut a piece of material about 12" wide allthe way through. When I need to make shims I cut off scrap 2X10 or 2X8 blocks about 12" long. Turn the blocks 90 degree so the end ...


1

If the bottom of the jamb is loose, shim behind it and fasten with a long screw. (Use the gap of the door to set the amount of shimming. If the screw draws the jamb in too much, back the screw out and push the shims in further.) Then, get a chunk of wood matching the jamb. I'm guessing 4-1/2" x 3/4" thick, by a few inches tall. Cut the new piece ...


1

Even when swept clean I would not consider that a properly prepared surface for a threshold. Just the nature of the uneven surface of those filled concrete blocks would make water tend to collect underneath. You should use a concrete patch/resurfacer to create a smooth level (or slightly sloped away from the opening) surface, then attach the threshold per ...


1

Sometimes the problem is a misaligned strike, especially if thick weatherstripping was added since the door was installed but it can happen for other reasons. I've patched that on multiple doorframes...



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