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5

I'm not a pest control specialist but that's got insect written all over it, and given the proximity to that wooden architrave/post/whatever-it-is I'd be worried about termites or some other wood boring critter. Call an exterminator post haste.


5

The short answer is longer screws, plus some glue. There should be plenty of extra room for longer screws on both the door and the jamb. If the hinges are brass, solid brass screws are best. Pre-drill. At the same time stick in a small strip of wood soaked in wood glue into each hole just to be sure. Toothpicks, chopsticks or similar dry wood work well. ...


4

Reline your jamb with another material that you can screw into. The pressure you will subject the door frame to is really needing something screwed into it. To just use pressure has the strong possibility of deforming or worse, cracking your jamb, depends on where the shims are placed behind the jamb, but you cant see them, unless you take it apart, not a ...


3

Now that I've seen the photos, it's clear to me that at least the jack studs should be replaced; fortunately, their replacement should be fairly easy. The one on the latch side could be replaced by a 4x4, but it should have a tiny "sill plate" attached to half its bottom end with contruction adhesive because otherwise it'll overhang the existing sill plate. ...


2

I would find myself a 1/4" or 3/8" diameter toothpick. Drill out the holes to the same diameter as the toothpick, insert some glue, and tap the toothpick in with a hammer. If you have difficulty finding toothpicks that large, Use dowel.


2

The recommended rough opening for a 36" x 80" door, is 38 1/2" x 82". So you're basically looking at something like this. Basically, you'll have to fill the purple area with framing. Which means you might have to either use thin planks on the sides, or cut into the walls to install framing. The rough opening (blue) around the jamb (brown) will be left ...


2

I would bet the doors were dryer than they are now. Most basements are more humid than the rest of a typical home, especially in the summer. In the winter they will shrink again, but it will be needed to trim a little here and there to get them to work in the summer.


2

Since you say that the wood under the hinge and around the hinge screw holes has split and gone soft it pays to check the wood of the door jamb adjacent to the hinge mount location as well. If the wood there is not sound then you are likely looking forward to some more serious repair such as replacement of the jamb side board or the whole jamb. If the ...


2

I personally do not think a PVC cement will give satisfactory results. I would probably: 1) find a thin gauge aluminum channel that fits over the broken frame, deep enough to cover the gouge, spray paint it to match, and silicone it down over the length of the frame. Or, 2) use automotive body filler, plane and sand to blend, than spray prime and paint the ...


1

I had two doors that would stick, a hand plane was much more effective then sanding. If you do not have one buy an Empire Pocket plane, they are around 10 dollars and just as effective.


1

Testor101 is correct in both points. Coping this joint with the coping saw is the way it was most likely done when it was built. It does allow for a corner to be a bit of out of square, but doing this will be taxing on the blade of a coping saw, it is a lot of wood to cut through. But it can be done with patience. Trying to rush through a cut this size will ...


1

I am not sure what your exact situation is but I did something very similar in my last house. We had a hallway that led to 4 bedrooms. The kitchen was right by the entrance to the hallway so it became very noisy. Again I was right around the same dimensions as you too - think mine was about 38" wide. What I did was install a pocket door. These come in ...


1

Most units are prehung. If the mortises on the jam and door look perfect and fit precisely, it is usually a prehung. Unless the situation is intolerable, I'd give it a while and let conditions change before making drastic changes to the door or hinge sets. I suspect possible settling or drastic humidity or temperature related expansion to the frame. You ...


1

Although MDF is more stable than solid wood, I won't claim that it will not swell enough with enough humidity to break the joints at the corners as solid wood will if there is no room for expansion, did that my self with a single panel in a 24" cabinet door 20 years ago never again... The strength of the door needs to be in the joinery, not the panel. There ...


1

It's a bit hard to say what is causing the noise without an onsite inspection. Why not just try to muffle it (unless you are concerned about a structural problem). Consider small bumpers, either vinyl, cork or felt, something like these These are all self-stick and any of them could be put on the top and/or bottom edge of the strike side of the door ...


1

You did not supply actual dimensions for the new door size, new frame rough opening size, or the old frame internal dimensions. As such it is difficult to give specific advice. That said here are some basic suggestions. 1) Before fitting the new frame within the old frame do remove the doorstop molding from the old frame. 2) Remove any and all casing from ...



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