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6

You could just chill out. Putting up bars or plastic on that door is truly ghetto. Doors like this are not inherently unsafe at all. Your door is appropriate for your neighborhood. Your door would be unsafe or inappropriate for a bad neighborhood or an apartment building. Having this glass probably does not effect your chances of burglary by ...


6

You could consider attaching a thick acrylic or other plastic panel that covers the interior of the glass and is firmly screwed to the door. The edges can then be covered with molding. Such plastics are shatter resistant. While they can be broken, they will not yield to the tools of most casual home intruders (unless they carry sledge hammers or blow ...


2

Nearly any door can be broken with minimal effort. The vulnerabilities are numerous. You are correct in identifying glass as one of them, but even with no glass, kicking in the door at the lock is another easy method unless the strike plate has been replaced with a special thick steel high-security model. Hinges can be another vulnerability if they're only ...


1

I think you might be going about this the wrong way. I saw in comments on your question about using a double-cylinder deadbolt on your front and rear entry doors. This is a bad idea, and may even violate local building codes, depending on whether your state/county/local authority has adopted the International Residential Code(IRC). According to the above ...


1

Polycarbonate is used for bulletproof glass in passenger trains. You don't have to worry about cinder blocks coming at you at 125 mph, so you don't need it 7/16” thick. Does the door have a normal glass panel in addition to the stained glass? If so, replace with polycarbonate. If not, alter the window molding to fit it. Nobody but you will even know it's ...



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