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18

Not only besides RH or LH, you need to determine swing direction. Trust me, this needs to be agreed upon. When I built the additional room onto my house, I thought 84 Lumber understood the direction of door swing and they didn't. There is left inswing, right inswing, left outswing, and right outswing. The door handle on my exterior door is on the right-hand ...


12

As a homeowner, I have installed many doors, and every time I do I have to re-learn how to "determine door swing". Just make sure you write it down before you order the door, it is easy to get confused again when you go to your local home improvement store. This website should help: http://www.naturalhandyman.com/iip/infdoor/infdoorhand.html First, the ...


12

If you're having the same problem I had, and it's a case of rubbing but the door could be forced closed (so it's just slightly off), I just made a note of where it was rubbing with a bit of crayon (wipes off easily), then took a small hand plane to shave down that area slightly. Unfortunately, I also made the mistake of passing off the plane to my house ...


8

It makes it easier for the carpet installer because they don't have the baseboards in the way when they're nailing in the tack strips next to the wall. On the other hand, it makes things a little more difficult to install the baseboard later because the carpet and tack strips are in the way when you're trying to nail the baseboard to the sole plate in the ...


8

I guess you could try putting some thin foam or felt stick on pads on the inside of the door frame where the door contacts it. This should lower the sound of the wood to wood contact. If the knob hardware is also loud, try using some dry silicon spray lubricant on the moving parts and on the door hinges. Sleep well.....


7

Bifold rough openings: to the hinge (pivot ) side add 3/4", to the other other side, 1/4" So for single 24" wide door, a 25" RO (which is really a finished opening for bifolds) is needed. You need a bit more clearance on the pivot side, because the pivot is inboard a bit and it needs clearance to swing through (pivot around) the thickness of the door. ...


6

My two cents worth..... We always install the base trim and door trim first. If you have split jam doors with the casings already attached, you must install them first or you will have a real problem fitting the jams to the floor between rooms. As mentioned, sometimes the carpet installers can scratch the finish on the baseboards, however it is usually ...


6

From International Residential Code, your local planning department is the final authority on what may or may not be done after inspecting what modifications you are intending to do. This is a job that requires a permit and consultation with an experienced contractor. R802.7.1 Sawn lumber. Notches in solid lumber joists, rafters, blocking and beams shall ...


6

I agree with Jeff Widmer -- you don't need a bigger/stronger bracket, as it's not the bracket that failed, but longer screws to properly fasten the bracket. Given that, your jamb repair doesn't need to be structural so don't sweat how strong it is and just make it look nice with whatever product you've used before and liked. After you drill your pilot ...


6

Short of reframing the door, I'd suggest taking a belt sander to the side of the door that sticks.


5

Your plan to fix the gap in the center of the door sounds fine. I might suggest using some shingle shims instead of flat stock however. If you want to just remove the interior trim only, that is fine also. Using the shingle shims, place the thickest end in first and by trial and error, adjust the opposing shim to a size that will snug in nicely and then by ...


5

First of all, some terminology. What you want to replace is called the JAMB. You can either replace the whole thing (prefered) or try and fit a smaller piece in to fix the broken area. With a utility knife, score the paint on both sides of the STOP (The thin piece that stops the door when it is closed. Pry it off with a small prybar, slot screw driver ...


5

You should definitely not cut those beams! They are massive because they carry the load of whatever is above you. If you want to modify the structure to carry that weight elsewhere, that is possible but you will need to get help from someone who knows how to safely modify structure and you will need a building permit. I'm guessing that sort of cost and ...


5

The closet doors are most likely listed in actual finished opening size. However it is a good idea to use a tape measure to check 100% for sure. Some doors are made a little oversize to allow trimming into final size for the specified opening size. Other doors may very well be made a small amount undersize to allow for the necessary clearances needed for a ...


5

The short answer is longer screws, plus some glue. There should be plenty of extra room for longer screws on both the door and the jamb. If the hinges are brass, solid brass screws are best. Pre-drill. At the same time stick in a small strip of wood soaked in wood glue into each hole just to be sure. Toothpicks, chopsticks or similar dry wood work well. ...


4

There's no such thing as US building codes, there are state, county, and municipal codes which vary widely between areas. The only way to know is to ask, which is what I'd recommend you do. There's no harm in it, simply call the office that is responsible and ask. You don't have to say you've already done it if you're worried about it, you could say you are ...


4

While local codes certainly vary, in general there's nothing wrong that I know of with that installation. Your door is not on the stairs, it's in the hall.


4

I can think of two options using the prehung doors available in HI stores: You can pull the door apart (they come in two pieces for the installation) and cut about 3/4" off of the inset part of the door. Since this side goes into the channel on the other half of the door, you'll never see it if the cut isn't pretty. I believe there's at least 1/4" of play ...


4

Can you just use longer screws? The screws would not only go through the damaged wood but also into whatever support is behind it. Of course this would not work if you have a side light on that side. The other thing to consider is not using a storm with a double closer, but just one on the bottom (although you may have a reason for the double closer).


4

There are lots of concerns I can think of (this is a much bigger project than simply cutting a rectangle in the wall): Exterior walls are load bearing, so you need to construct a header, king, and jack studs, to properly transfer the load over the door. During construction of this, it's a good idea to install temporary bracing. Any utility lines in the ...


4

Reline your jamb with another material that you can screw into. The pressure you will subject the door frame to is really needing something screwed into it. To just use pressure has the strong possibility of deforming or worse, cracking your jamb, depends on where the shims are placed behind the jamb, but you cant see them, unless you take it apart, not a ...


4

I'm not a pest control specialist but that's got insect written all over it, and given the proximity to that wooden architrave/post/whatever-it-is I'd be worried about termites or some other wood boring critter. Call an exterminator post haste.


3

The loose base is causing catching at the opposite corner because the entire door and frame is pivoting around the upper hinge and nearby framing that is presumably still attached firmly to the jack stud behind the frame. As the bottom left part of the frame swings out, the upper right of the door is moving up to where it hits against the frame there. Take ...


3

Ok Kenny, here is the plan. You can remove one Jack stud and door header with a sawzall(cutting between the studs to cut the nails) and some work. You can then replace the jack stud with a 3/4" board cut to 3 1/2" width and the new 3/4" higher height. Put a 3/4" block on top of the remaining jack stud and reinstall the header 2X4. It will still fit between ...


3

Now that I've seen the photos, it's clear to me that at least the jack studs should be replaced; fortunately, their replacement should be fairly easy. The one on the latch side could be replaced by a 4x4, but it should have a tiny "sill plate" attached to half its bottom end with contruction adhesive because otherwise it'll overhang the existing sill plate. ...


2

What I would do if it is hitting on the latch side is to remove a screw on each hinge in the middle of the hinge and replace it with a screw that is about 3½" to 4" long. Tightening these screws will pull the jamb in on the hinge side giving your door room to close on the latch side. Try it.


2

I'm not sure about ChrisF's suggestion since I've never had that particular problem (with the door rubbing on the hinge side) - is the issue that it's hitting the frame on the hinge side or the doorknob side? If it's hitting the jamb on the doorknob side (as if the door is now too wide) then the usual solution is to trim down the door. Usually I would run ...


2

How do I go about fixing this? I guess I could take them off again, and chisel away a little on the door grooves or in the frame, That's pretty much the only way - but take a good look and work out which side (door or frame) needs to move and in which direction. I've done this in the past and gone the wrong way at first which isn't good. In some cases ...


2

I can't believe 3-6 inches is correct. Maybe 3/16 of an inch? (even that is pushing it). The easiest way to fix this is to take the door down and trim a bit off the top of the door. I'll usually just run the door through my table saw to trim it down, but a power planer would probably work better if you have one. Otherwise a hand planer will work too, but ...


2

It's best explained on this page: http://www.specialtydoorhardware.com/door-handedness/ Left Hand – Hinges on the left, opens inward. Left Hand Reverse – Hinges on the left, opens outward. Right Hand – Hinges on the right, opens inward. Right Hand Reverse – Hinges on the right, opens outward.



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