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15

From the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) of Klean-StripĀ® Boiled Linseed Oil. Flammable Properties and Hazard RISK OF FIRE FROM SPONTANEOUS COMBUSTION EXISTS WITH THIS PRODUCT. Oily rags, waste, and other oily materials can cause spontaneous combustion fires if not handled properly. Immediately after use, and before disposal or storage, you ...


11

The trouble with linseed oil, especially boiled linseed oil, is that it generates heat as it dries. If you leave BLO-soaked rags in a pile, the drying process proceeds but heat is trapped. The drying process accelerates as the rags warm up, and the temperature rises to the point of ignition. Spreading the rags out lets the heat escape so that the drying ...


8

Your local fire department should take them off your hands and dispose of them properly (in an environmentally safe manner) and safely. I say the above, as I recently wanted to dispose of some old engine coolant in a responsible manner and didn't know where I could take it for disposal, so I went to our local fire station to ask them, they pointed me in the ...


7

When it burns, treated wood emits all sort of nasty chemicals that it was treated, such as trivalent chromium, copper sulfate, and arsenic. Not good stuff to breathe or pump into the air. If you can't find a way to use the leftover wood, the most responsible thing is to just take it to the dump. At least they'll have waste and runoff containment systems.


6

In the US, from the EPA: If you must dispose treated wood, follow these recommendations: State statute prohibits open burning of treated lumber. Typically, open burning of any kind can only occur at town transfer stations, by permit, involving only clean (untreated) wood and brush. Other limited open burning situations can occur at other ...


6

to avoid fire you can do a few things: remove fuel: not as easy, but washing the rags and disposing of the waste water properly should reduce the risk here remove air: storing the rags in a sealed can or under sand or submerged in water (you can add detergent to wash them at the same time) will take care of that remove heat: if you keep the rags under the ...


6

Contact your local council (or equivalent) to see if they have a safe disposal site. Another alternative could be to contact a local mechanic or scrap yard to see how they dispose of petrol from the cars they deal with. You never know they might offer to take it off your hands for you.


6

If you can not find someone to take care of the acid for you, it is possible for you to dispose of it yourself. this page which references batterycouncil.org which most discreetly describes the process outlined here that states: Gather together all the acid you need to dispose of and put on some sort of concrete pad. The high acidity may harm grass and ...


6

Mirrors are made up of two parts, the glass and then a reflective coating on the back. Because of this, they are not considered 100% glass and many times the town's recycle pickup (if your have one) for glass will not take them because there will be an additional process to separate the glass from the reflective material backing. Possible disposal methods: ...


5

As my high school chemistry instructor made us learn: Do as you oughta - add acid to water. If you add water to acid, the reaction dynamics work out badly and you get the MSDS warning - the water boils, this spits acid solution all over, and is dangerous. If you add acid to water, the reaction dynamics work in a more favorable fashion, and nothing ...


4

The municipalities just don't want it liquid or with the lid on. Imagine a paint can full of paint when the compactor squishes down on it. Paint everywhere! You can put whatever you want in the paint to make it more solid. Kitty litter, the store bought stuff drying agent, sand. I have used some old mortar that I had on hand. You just want to make sure ...


3

Check your town ordinances. Some towns insist it always be treated as construction waste so they can process it separately; others will let you toss small amounts in the trash (recognizing that homeowners are gonna be a bit sloppy) but over a few pounds needs to be sequestered; it's possible some are still ignoring the issue and just landfilling anything ...


3

An Oily Rags Bucket is not just a metal bucket with a lid, nor is it sealed, ever (explosions are worse than a fire). It is a specially designed container incapable of being left open while it remains upright. The top handle keeps it from opening past a 45 degree angle; self closing. The means of disposal may differ, however the safe storage of oily rags ...


3

I'm going to second mikes advice about wearing rubber gloves and safety glasses, especially if you can't guarantee that the container is properly sealed. If you get any on you, simply flush with lots of water, and apply a paste of baking soda and water to neutralize (I would flush first while someone else mixes the paste). For transport, just make sure that ...


3

Many, but not all, can be refilled/recharged. I'd ask the local fire dept who does that, get a quote, and compare it to the cost of buying a replacement If not, then if there is any pressure left they might be interested in having it for demo purposes.


3

The procedure I used was: I fully discharged it into a large bucket/tub, then removed the top (it just unscrewed), separating the valve assembly and nozzle from the metal tank. This ensures the internal pressure is atmospheric pressure. I then took the parts to my local household waste recycling centre and put the cylinder in the "metal" bin. The dry-...


2

Remove it from the basement while wearing safety glasses and rubber gloves and a rubber rain coat if you have one.If you can get a plastic storage container store it out side in that.You can try an auto supply store or battery specialtyshop to see if they will take it or anyplace that recycles metal as most take batteries.Some communities have a waste/...


2

You did the right thing running the dishwaser drain line as high as possible first. This will keep a sink full of water from filling the drain line. Now you just need to cut the drain line to the appropriate length so that it's all downhill from the high point.


2

I would not burn pressure treated wood, the smoke would be toxic. You're supposed to just throw it out with regular garbage. As far as I know recyclers don't want it.


2

Look to see if your municipality has a home hazardous waste disposal. I have in a large metro area and they have multiple locations and open Tue-Sat. I've been in another where they were only open once a month. But it is a good location to dispose of batteries, paint, meds and other chemicals I don't need around the home.


2

The best solution would be to pour the liquid into another metal or glass container that can be sealed to prevent evaporation. Some plastics may also be acceptable; see my question about plastic containers for a table showing what can safely contain what. Reminder: always label containers clearly, and remove any old labels. You don't want to risk someone ...


2

When containing petroleum-based solvents it is best to place them in a metal or glass jar that can be sealed. Empty paint cans or preserve jars work well (but be sure to re-label the new container to avoid it being misconstrued for anything other than it is). Trying to patch an opening with tape on a solvent filled vessel will not hold very long as the ...


2

If you have municipal trash collection, you'll want to contact the company in charge of pickup. It's quite common for them to have a website, which typically has information about how to handle various types of waste. If you're not sure who handles the collection. That information is usually available on the town/city website, or by calling the town/city....


1

Just the trash, if you can cut it up. Or, you'll have to setup for a Bulk Trash Pickup with your Township, likely $10 for that stuff. But no recycling program will accept that & only Blinds To Go takes working vinyl blinds.


1

Short term, I would drain it into a glass or steel jug or can and leave the empty container outside, capless for a month to evaporate the residue. Then recycle it. Rather than dump or deal with household hazardous waste, I dispose of unwanted paint or paint chemicals by mixing them into viable paint, paint something I don't want, then throw it away.


1

NO. You CANNOT power a disposal from an existing kitchen counter receptacle circuit. If the dishwasher is on a 20A circuit typically you can share that circuit, other than that usually they are on a dedicated circuit.


1

Look for a scrap metal dealer in your area. If you deliver the steel parts to the recycler, you ought to get at least $400 per tonne (which is $440 per U.S. ton or $0.22 per pound). See this.


1

Yes. The disposal unit should have a barbed inlet that is intended to receive the dishwasher's drain line. As others have mentioned, be sure to check that the knock-out plug has been removed from inside the barbed inlet. You can remove it by using a screw driver and a hammer. Also be sure that you run the dishwasher drain hose up to the underside of the ...


1

Are you in the USA? The green screw should be Ground (green or bare wire), not Neutral (white). Generally: Line is "hot", with the active AC voltage present. Neutral is the return path for the current. All current should travel from Line, through the load, and then back through Neutral. Ground is there for safety only. It should only carry current in ...


1

The common disposal unit drain pipe connection looks like the following picture: There may be some variation in the design of the tail pipe assemblies from manufacturer to manufacturer but the ones for the above type connection generally follow the form shown here: These tail pipe pieces are generally supplied with the disposer. It is possible to ...



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