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30

There is a very simple answer to your question. Your dishwasher is draining into the side drain adapter on your garbage disposer. this was a common practice for many years. All the water draining from your dishwasher is being pumped into the upper basin side of the disposer. Solids from the dishwasher are blocking the drain in the disposer, so when you turn ...


12

Standing water in the bottom of the dish washer after a cleaning cycle is complete is NOT normal. After the wash/rinse cycle and the pump out your dishwasher not have water in it. Standing water could be due to number of problems. I'll list out some of the things to check on. 1) There is a possibility that the filter screen in the bottom of your washer if ...


10

This might be of interest. Air gap Many local building codes require a dishwasher to connect to an air gap before the connection to a garbage disposer. This keeps wastewater from backing up into the appliance. You must purchase the air gap separately. Mount in on top or next to the sink. Connect one flexible hose to the drain of the ...


10

This is an air gap fitting for your dishwasher drain. You still need it. Its job is to ensure that waste water in your drain cannot backup into your dishwasher. Since the dishwasher isn't really water tight above a certain level, this eliminates the risk of raw sewage from ending up on your floor via the dishwasher. The air gap needs to be above the flood ...


9

The racks in virtually all dishwashers are unique to the particular models from each manufacturer. In other words no standardization. It is possible to imagine that it may be possible to clean up the rust and corrosion on the wires of the rack. Doing so would require removal of the plastic coating that covers the afflicted area. After you get it all cleaned ...


7

A GFCI is a good idea because of the location of the outlet. However, I don't think that a GFCI that can simultaneously protect two circuits even exists (and I doubt one would fit into a single-gang box if it did exist), so I believe you have a couple of options: Install GFCI breakers on the dishwasher and disposal circuits, and use a regular outlet under ...


7

Check your manual! It should say. My dishwasher specifically states that there should always be a small amount of water remaining in the dishwasher, and if there isn't (say during first run after installation) you should add several cups of water. Source:GE Dishwasher manual (PDF)


6

The answer to that question in Electrical standards is NO! The problem is that both these machines use heating elements that can cause surge power to heat water. Now if you use(not you but anybody unknowingly) use them at the same time it could cause an overload. Fine- you are protected by 1-The wall plug, 2-The DB Breaker. Causing such an overload during ...


6

I had exactly the same issue with my dishwasher. Standing water at the bottom after the wash cycle almost every time, yet the dishwasher appeared to be draining correctly. Nevertheless, the first thing to verify is that the dishwasher is indeed draining properly. Start a cycle to partially fill the washer, then manually engage the drain cycle. Does the ...


6

If you want to have power always on to a box that is downstream of a switch, you'll need to use 3-conductor cable between the switch and split the hot side of the outlet. At the outlet, break off the tab on the hot side only between the top and bottom outlet. Wire the red conductor to one of the hot screws, the black conductor to the other one, and then ...


5

I'd like to thank everyone participating and up-voting. I went to home depot today and bought a new air gap. Upon a further inspection I found out that my air gap is missing a cover: a piece of plastic that routes the water coming from the DW into the drain. Long story short, it somehow got popped out and my wife "saved" it by sticking into the kitchen ...


5

You can definitely get dishwashers that are not as deep as the standard, though selection will be more limited. One thing to consider is that the dishwasher needs a bit of clearance and wiggle room, so you'll likely need to accomodate more than 1" difference. I would recommend against chipping away at the studs in you wall as this will reduce the strength ...


5

There are a number of issues with the plan. The biggest problem may be the routing of the water supply and drain across the door threshold. Wire covers are intended to cover wire, not hollow tubing. More importantly, the channels in them are usually not more than 3/4 high (most smaller) and will not fit a drain line. If you could find one large enough, it ...


5

The cover of the detergent cup is not opening when its supposed to. If you need to expose the cup to investigate, it is not opening at all. The spring loaded cover is held closed over the detergent by a little catch. There is a solenoid in the door that pulls on the catch, letting the cover spring open. This happens at the start of the main wash cycle. The ...


5

Dishwashers can be either hardwired, or cord-and-plug connected. Check the owners manual of the unit you have, but in most cases the decision is left to the installer. From a random Maytag Dishwasher Installation Guide (PDF) In newer homes you'll commonly find a 125V NEMA 5-15R receptacle supplied by a 20 ampere circuit, used to supply a dishwasher ...


4

first, remove the drain hose. it's usually a flexible hose connected to he drain pipe under your sink. be careful, because when you remove it, it may spill a bunch of nasty water from both the hose and the bottom of the dishwasher. clean out the hose, or replace it if it looks crushed or damaged at all. every dishwasher has a one-way valve to prevent the ...


4

As others have pointed out, the diswasher drain line probably connects to the top of the disposal. The diswasher drain line will dump dirty water and food particles into the top of your disposal. Do you run the disposal prior to starting the dishwasher? If you have crap built up in your disposal, that can be contributing to a backup. The manual for my ...


4

I only have 2005 NEC handy, but there's nothing there against using same circuit for both dishwasher and disposal. 210.23(A) Branch circuits, rated 20 or 15 amperes may feed lighting units, utilization equipment or combination of both. The rating of of any one cord and plug connected utilization equipment shall not exceed 80% of the branch circuit ampere ...


4

For the record--in case there are any more of these models out there!--here's how it worked out. The KitchenAid people were very helpful, but all they had were installation instructions for a comparable model. From that I learned that the sink, sink cabinet, and dishwasher were originally installed as a "unit." So, I gave up, figuring there were loads ...


4

Dishwashers are no longer being connected to garbage disposals, though that was the previous way and it grandfathered in for anyone that already has it installed this way. If you are plumbing a new trap in another part of your kitchen for the dishwasher, remember that it will require a vent. See also Shirlock's answer here.


4

I just recently paired a leak detector with a power relay for an upstairs laundry. The leak detector has an output contact that is sensed by the power relay. Floodstop detector, leak sensor and single valve for dishwasher Furman power relay I bought an extra sensor (they connect easily in parallel), so that I had one in the pan and one just outside at ...


4

Dishwashers usually have a built in food disposer, so having one is not required. I also suggest just replacing the existing disposer instead of removing it altogether. Cheapest ones cost around $60 and since they usually feature a quick change mechanism, the whole process takes 15 minutes. But if you remove one, then you will have to reroute a drain pipe ...


4

You have two good options with a stone counter top if there isn't a mounting strip already under the countertop. Option 1: Install a mounting strip under the counter, going all the way to the side cabinets and securing with some adhesive to the underside of the countertop (I've heard silicon suggested, but I'd prefer something stronger). I'd also use a ...


3

"Do I just go to town on the end of that with a hacksaw and clamp on the drain hose?" Yes. The end is capped so that it can be installed without being connected to anything. Leaving it uncapped would leave it open for leaks if you were to fill the drainpipe. Just cut off the end as near to the cap as you can reasonable fit a saw, and slip the hose over ...


3

Many disposals have a specific connection for a dishwasher. If yours has one you can use that, or if you haven't bought one yet, look for a model with that feature. Note: This may no longer be up to code in your area: see Why does my dishwasher back up into the sink, but running the disposal allows it to drain? That said, many dishwashers have ...


3

Several places I can think of, but the best way I can think of to narrow it down is to look for water damage on the dishwasher itself. Check the seal around the door. In my own kitchen, I'll be gutting and expecting to replace a lot of floor boards myself because the dishwasher feet were adjusted too long and were causing it to be crushed by the counter ...


3

There will always be only enough water left in the sump to keep the seals from drying out but should not be any water in the tub. This small amount of water is drained away after the machine fills and drains when you use it again, leaving fresh water in the sump.


3

Clog or Restricted Drain The most likely cause of this would be a clog, or restriction in the drain line. When the dishwasher discharges, it's too much water too fast for the drain to handle. The water likely backs up into the tub, because it's the easiest escape for the excess water. If there is a clog, it would be somewhere in the drain line after the ...


3

Assuming you're in the US (though I can't imagine it being much different elsewhere, but do check!) ... Be sure to check the label, but most dishwashers run perfectly happy on a 15A circuit. If a dedicated circuit to the dishwasher isn't possible, you can come out of a general receptacle circuit that isn't otherwise utilized in the kitchen, depending on the ...


3

Continuity is "An unbroken electrical path in an electronic circuit or connector[1]". First thing, unplug the dishwasher or if hard-wired turn off the circuit breaker. Unplug the connector to the heating element and then test the contacts on the heating element. A heating element is a semi-conductive (typically coil) that creates heat as it resists the ...



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