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20

I've built this desk twice. It costs me ~$100 USD in materials: And here is my version of the desk: You can adjust it, but it is a little difficult. However, you can fit a modified treadmill under it as you can see in this video of me using the desk. I'm able to type comfortably while walking at 2.2 MPH. If I may presume that the reason you want a ...


19

This is just my opinion, but I think you might be hard pressed to build one cheaper than you can buy one. If you're just looking for a project, it might be a challenging one. But if you're looking to save money building your own, I don't think you will. If you own your own fabrication shop and have lots of scrap to use then this might be an interesting ...


13

If you want to make a non-traditional desk you could have four posts fashioned together into a frame that goes high in the air. You could then "hang" the desk using an easily adjustable pulley system to raise or lower the desk. The surface could then be on a track system to keep it secure. There would be plenty of caveats but something like this could work ...


12

ApplePly is a brand name for an all-hardwood veneer plywood that is higher quality than your typical construction or cheap hardwood plywoods. (You may want to confirm that your "applewood" plywood is truly ApplePly). ApplePly should be similar in quality to baltic birch plywoods and like baltic birch it is not supposed to contain voids. You can find these ...


12

I recommend Kim Stanley Robinson's Bibliography, fleshed out with some Frank Herbert, and a large solid hardback for the top; I'm using 'The Pythons' in the case, but gardening and DIY manuals are equally good candidates. Fine tuning can be done with Asimov, Van Vogt, Niven, or Simak. You may be tempted to use Ian Livingstone and Steve Jackson, but ...


11

I'd make a template in the shape of a square donut out of 1/2" plywood by using a table saw to cut out the square hole in the 1/2" plywood. For example, if ... i) the recess in the desktop needs to be 8"x12" ii) the diameter of the base of the router is 6" iii) the diameter of the router bit is 1/2" ... then I'd ... 1) start with a rectangular piece ...


10

I use 2 3-drawer file cabinets with a 8 foot door. It works really well. Adjustment higher can be done with some 1/4"-1/2" pieces of plywood but the height works well for me. It has the added benefit of storage.


8

I bet you could eliminate a lot of the engineering and fabrication work in making something like this by making a desk that has only two positions, standing and sitting, vs. trying to make one that's continuously adjustable anywhere between its highest and lowest setting. I'm thinking of something using a four-bar linkage on each end of the desk to keep the ...


7

You would need to mount wooden strips along the walls that screw into the studs. Then the desktop sits on top of those strips and is fastened from the underside to the strips. To achieve a more sleek look you could also consider the use of some lengths of aluminum angle iron that is screwed into the studs and into the bottom side of the desk surface. ...


5

Using crates to support the desk is more of a hack than a DIY project. What may be useful is a recently-asked question about spanning long distances with shelves, many of the answers apply here. If you're going to create your own legs, there are many ways to do it. Using standard dimensional (2x4 or 4x4) lumber would be one way. A relatively easy way that ...


5

Is the ledge that the monitors are sitting on actually attached to the desk? It kind of looks like it's just resting on the speakers (Btw, I swear I had those same speakers like 15 years ago). Since there is some natural bounce in any kind of wooden surface like you have, my guess is it's transferring to the upper support which will naturally be prone to ...


5

I'm a programmer and I currently use a drafting table as an adjustable standing desk. I wanted something that I could use in both sitting and standing position. The table I'm using is similar to the model shown here: I can adjust the height by loosening the knobs and sliding the upper section upwards. The tabletop can be adjusted to be horizontal. ...


5

You want a gloss enamel. Yes, you can use spray paint with it ... although I'd definitely sand it VERY carefully first with an orbital sander and 120 and 220 sandpaper, wipe down with tackcloth very carefully, prime with an oil based primer, sand again with 220, wipe, prime again, and sand AGAIN with 220 or possibly even a finer grit ... you want to make ...


4

For an inexpensive and easy to work with material I would consider MDF. In particular there is coloured MDF available. The colour is throughout the board, not just painted on the surface, here's an example: The benefit of this is that simply scratching the surface will not remove the colour. It also gives the MDF a neat texture as the colour is not 100% ...


4

L Brackets are not going to be a good idea for this type of project. As a minumum you will need to have a triangle type bracket - if you can find something large enough. If you want to avoid any type of legs right at the front edge you could build your own equivalent of a triangle bracket out of wood. If I was setting out to make a built in unit mounted ...


4

Open it so it jams then back it off a bit, so whatever is causing the jam is not stuck. Then using a ruler, piece of cardboard, or other flat object, work it into the gap so it rests above the drawer contents and presses down on them (or just guides them) to free them from the drawer or frame above.


4

Cam and follower Gears Hoist Lever Linear actuator Ball screw Hydraulic cylinder Jackscrew Leadscrew Linear motor Pneumatic cylinder Rigid chain actuator Rigid belt actuator Roller screw Segmented spindle Telescopic cylinder Winch Scissors mechanism Windlass Weightlifter


3

In most cases, if you have done all the right things like sanding and cleaning between coats, you should be done and have an excellent smooth glossy finish. Any further sanding or polishing with any kind of abrasive will dull the finish. Normally urethane does not need a wax. After some use and a good week or two of total cure time, a regular furniture wax ...


3

Particle board with laminate. Cut laminate so it's a little larger, glue it on with contact cement and trim the edges with a router. Cheap and durable. + =


3

I did my own with a simple steel rod, the kind you can find in different lenghts and diameters in a any hardwarestore. I cutted the rods to match my drawer width, drilled 2 holes on both sides of my drawer (without going all the way through), inserted the rods and voilĂ : a simple file drawer.


3

As another approach, you could consider laminate like this from Lowes. It's basically a glossy sheet (1 or so mm thick) that you glue onto your surface and then trim to fit. I've never done it, and I understand it's a bit of a pain to get right (you need to use contact cement, and once that stuff sticks, it's STUCK, so you can't re-position the sheet if you ...


3

Depending on how closely you're going to try to match the original finish (or if close enough is close enough) you could use wood filler. This product is basically saw dust and glue. Most of them are stainable, so you could fuss with it to match your desk's finish. This is an example, I am not affiliated in any way with any company in the link, just the ...


3

Been thinking about this all day and I came up with two ideas, both less than desk-like to keep the costs down. Simple tabletop mounted to rails on the wall. Lots of options for mechanical lift (scissor jack was my first idea, but I'd probably play with something hydraulic for fun). The rails would work like they do on a shelving system. You'd have to ...


3

The tool you are looking for is a Router: If going the manual route, chisels would do the job too:


3

You can buy one of the many available adjustable router templates or make your own. Retail Template Example Shop-made Template Example Using Templates There are lots of ways to use templates, like router bits with bearings, or you could use template bushings, or just push the baseplate against the template.


3

If the desk is particle board (that grainy stuff that is made from sawdust and glue), then I'd avoid trying to screw anything directly into it. Instead, I would get a piece of 3/8" plywood, and glue it to the bottom of the desk using some construction adhesive (sold in various forms at all the big box stores; PL9000 or No More Nails are some products that ...


2

The picture helps. I'm guessing that the likely culprit is the slenderness of the legs. I'd probably try to put some sort of bracing across the "rear" three legs, and see if that helps. You might also try some diagonal bracing, as a little give in any of the bolted holes will allow some pretty significant movement at the feet. I'm going to assume that ...


2

I've always been interested in this and always thought the easiest way would be to use a cantilever design and a weight on one end that would allow easy adjustment up and down. Then you'd only need a friction knob to hold it in place. If the weight on top of the desk changed, you would just adjust the weights on the lever.



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