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2

It's all in the aggregate. There are a lot of options depending on the look you're going for. Abalone shell is popular, and monochromatic glass chips could work well too. What you do is add a lot of these aggregates to your concrete mix (appropriately colored, and including performance-enhancing additives such as metakaolin or ground granulated blast furnace ...


2

It's called terazzo: The basic process is: add your 'sparkle' substance as aggregate (glass is a typical option) pour concrete after concrete sets, you use a diamond grinder to expose the top layer of aggregate


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You can add white rock on the surface of your cement & tamp it in then finish this will give some color. Exposed aggregate uses this technique if they want white, black brown rock not just plain cement. Bags of colored rock can be found at many home improvement stores.


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I'm sure you will be a lot happier sleeping on your home made design if you add some diagonal braces -- one across the back and one on each side. Professional furniture designers know how to construct strong joints using hard wood and proper brackets, but with the materials and techniques available to us amateurs it is wiser to overbuild a little.


4

It seems like you are actually asking several questions here, so I'll break down my answer: Is spruce appropriate? short answer: yes. A softwood like spruce will be relatively inexpensive, and plenty strong enough if you use thick enough pieces. Be aware that it may dent more easily than a hardwood. For a project like this, almost any kind of wood will be ...


1

Laminated MDF is the typical form material (aka, prefab shelf boards). You can usually get the laminate in strips (for backsplashes and edge-banding counter tops). I'd make the square parts of the form, then use several layers of the edge banding laminate to create your curve. Create a curve template out of plywood, then glue the laminate around the curve.


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Any type of thin plywood will do. Cut it into 6 inch strips and it bends easier. You might need two layers. Intalls the strips inside your frame, don't use the strips as your frame.


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1/4" birch underlayment plywood (Tecply) should take that bend even without kerfs, moisture or heat. I'd probably double or triple it (without fastening together) for stiffness. Build your form out of lumber, then either rabbet the lumber for the plywood to achieve a flush joint, or lay plywood all the way down the 2 sides adjacent to the bend.


5

Unfortunately, as with most questions like this, you're going to have to talk to an engineer. A bunch of amateur DIYers on the internet, is not the proper resource for this type of information. You're making a major structural change to a building, and you don't want it to cause property damage or personal injury. The "correct" and responsible thing to ...


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Since stick framing has been around so long, and there are so many millions of stick framed structures around, there really aren't many unique situations. Getting creative can be BIG trouble. I don't think I have a real clear picture of your framing from the diagrams but enough to make some remarks. RE #1 - Cutting the "wall joist" - that's a ...



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