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We removed an old brick chimney to install a modern (well, 1970's modern - stainless steel is more common these days in your better chimneys) block and tile chimney by simply hammering and removing bricks. If you do it top down it's "apparently more tedious" but actually less time overall than anything involving "knocking it down" and then clearing up the ...


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Bricks and mortar... Anecdotally, I removed an embedded brick chimney from a 1900's era house. It was (floating above for a stove) resting on a 2x4 frame, supported by two 2x4's at a 45. Amazingly even once removed, someone had to go in the attic and pound on it a little. KABOOM! -and then we took a nice long lunch. We first removed what we could from the ...


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From the top down, one brick at a time. All your chisels strikes should impact towards the lower and next brick, laterally or directly downwards. Place the chisel point in the mortar bed, drive it under the brick, and voilĂ . If the top row abuts something, these bricks may be difficult, but the rest will come right out once two adjacent sides are free. ...


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Those stones are just facing and can be knocked out with chisel/hammer combo. The shelf might need a sledge hammer or a lot of whacks with hammer.


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Use (if you can fit it on) or replicate the function of a "lally column cutter" - I suspect replicate the function will be the better bet - use a cutoff disk in an angle grinder to score a line around the base of the steel (not a piddly little score, ideally - deepish, but it need not hit concrete) and then smack the top of the column. Enjoy the power of ...



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