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9

You didn't mention how tall the chimney is. 2 story house or single. Is there or was there ever a displacement for a fireplace, one flue or two? Lined or bare brick interior? In general, the procedure is brick by brick. A small mini jack/impact hammer will speed up the process, but it can be done with a hammer and cold chisel. Most chimneys are ...


9

The only way to do what you want to do is cut the concrete with a gear driven saw and masonry blade, then jack hammer out the rest of the concrete. It really is not that difficult and you can rent all the equipment and do it in a day easy. You don't have to cut all the way through the concrete, but at least 1/3 the way through. it should break off cleanly. ...


7

OH, looks like fun! Love to demo small buildings. Basic tools will be great. Large rip claw hammers, pry bars, a good 4 foot demo bar, a circular saw, and MOST IMPORTANT tool would be a good reciprocating saw with long bi-metal demo blades. Be careful, start at the top, remove the roof panels. cut off the rafters one at a time. then either cut and knock ...


7

Tile is generally installed as a permanent fixture. Removal is intended to be difficult - in fact easy removal is a clear indicator that the installation wasn't done well. The sub-material is often destroyed in the removal process because of the force necessary for removal of the product. DITRA, being textured, would hold onto the mortar used to mount the ...


5

The only thing bearing on that wall are shampoo bottles. Knock away. The wall is empty. Note that the end of the porcelain tub is open, so something will have to go back to cover it up. When it's open you can inspect under the tub for horrors. But you'll also want to remove the wall sheathing all around that tub, and read up about flashing and backer ...


5

If it was poured onto an already existing slab, I would try separating it from the slab first to see if it can be broken away and leave the floor intact. Note: The pad should weigh about 815 pounds (370 kg) so light duty efforts are inappropriate. Obtain two heavy steel digging bars like this along with some scrap 2x4s or similar. With heavy gloves on, ...


5

Asbestos has been banned in Europe for over a decade you will be fine. Blue and brown asbestos was been banned since 1985 and white asbestos since 1999 (resolving and complete end by 2005) so 2008 (manufactured or sold) gypsum board could not legally have asbestos. The only danger you'd face is the possibly older insulation behind it or you end up shaking ...


4

I tried the screwdriver and chisel technique with some tiles in a flat in Brighton... and quickly gave up once I found there were three layers of tiles there! So I invested in a cheapish power chisel - like a hammer drill, only it doesn't go around - and finished the job in a weekend. If you go this route, it's definitely worth buying ear defenders and a ...


4

I had the same problem with a much bigger wall and I was using a small sledge hammer. No matter how hard I swung the hammer the wall wasn't moving. So I got a bigger sledge hammer . . . one that has a 4 foot handler and a 12 pound head. It was about $20 at Harbor Freight (cheap tools but they work for weekend jobs). I took one swing at the top (it was ...


4

Couple possibilities I can think of (hard to tell without looking at a floor plan): Floor was built over a larger area and then covered over. Landing or base of the stairs was moved, possibly during early construction. Floor or landing was intentionally extended to provide a shelf for storage. Joists are continuing to a load bearing structure (wall of the ...


4

Generally, house mice don't carry hantavirus. However, it sounds like your property may be semi-rural, so there might be deer mice, which may carry it. I found this Center for Disease Control PDF. Interestingly enough, it doesn't talk about respiratory protection at all. It seems that all you need to do is spray down the old nests/etc. with disinfectant ...


3

You have electrical in your shed. Before doing anything that branch needs to be terminated correctly. I don't think there is a pure art to the small demo. I personally would slice the front wall beams halfway up with whatever saw I thought would be the quickest and then sledge hammer from the corners. Roof should fall/slide down. Then I would just ...


3

If it is nailed/ screwed only to the joists without any furring strips between the joists I would use a Sawz-all or a reciprocating saw. Cut or hammer a hole large enough to verify there are no cables or plumbing between two joist. Run the saw blade along the inside edge of the joists and remove the drywall in the largest pieces you can handle. When the only ...


3

The magic words you want are "RRP", the EPA Renovation, Repair and Painting rules. For a simple residential demolition that's all you need. For details see http://www2.epa.gov/lead/renovation-repair-and-painting-program Homeowners can take the RRP certification course (I did), but in most cases you'll want to ask the contractor for their RRP certification ...


3

See if you can get hold of a big heavy hammer. You will most likely need a masonry chisel too, not least as if the mortar is hard it will be quite tricky to remove from underneath the bottom course of bricks. This is the kind of "occasional" job where it's handy to know someone (friend? family) who you can lend you the tools for the weekend. Or, hire them. ...


3

Best bet would be to have some one come in and cut it for you. Then you could take care of the demo of the half you don't need. This will result in the cleanest possible division. Edit You may also be able to rent the saw and cut it on your own. I love to DIY things, but this seems like something I would have a pro do.


2

You are going to need to pull permits unless you live somewhere that doesn't have any requirements for them. Since that is probably visible from the road, there is almost no way that code enforcement or one of your neighbors isn't going to see it and report you. The stairs look like the precast concrete kind and probably are hollow and not attached to your ...


2

Typically I hit the first one (kind of gently) with a hammer until it cracks/shatters. Grind out the grout then pry out the pieces with a chisel or just a beefy flathead screwdriver. Once you have one out, you should be able to use a chisel or a flat head screwdriver to get under the other ones. Put the screwdriver under/against the edge of the tile and ...


1

First, sort out the electrical and be triply certain it's disconnected but good. Then, place an ad for "free shed, you remove" Then place an ad for "free fill - unwanted Concrete slab, you break it up and take it away." Only if those fail do you need to worry about removing it yourself. Sucks to be Blake + Steve - not even two years use (it doesn't look ...


1

Interesting. I've always found drywall easy to remove: In fact it is frightening how little effort it takes to remove it considering the amount of work it takes to put it up and make it look good. While getting a start on a sheet can be challenging, once three of the edges are free and clear, it usually comes down almost a whole sheet at a time. To get ...


1

You've got a fairly sizable amount of extra refrigerant line. Lifting your air handler a couple of inches will not be a problem. The only part I would worry about is where the lines attach to the air handler. That's where the tightest bend radius is and you don't want to get that any tighter. But since you're going up, that should actually improve that bend ...


1

I recently took apart the bathroom in my basement. It was a steel tub and I had to bust up the tiles around it to take the screws out, then bust a hole in the other side of the wall to disconnect the plumbing. If you don't need to save it, take your anger out on it. Just be careful not to smash it near the plumbing and be careful to smash it only where it's ...



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