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I agree with Ecnerwal entirely. But, absolutely screw the deck boards down & don't use nails, unless you like them popping up & ripping your foot or catching a shoe or high heel. Screwing the boards down is structural, for mostly just the boards...it spreads the stress instead of snapping a board from a fatboy standing between joists. Definitely, ...


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Assuming your deck is somewhat modern and properly designed and built, it can easily handle a live load of 13 pounds per square foot (no extra footings required, no need to worry about aligning the table legs over joists, etc). That said, I am assuming your deck is somewhat modern and properly built. You should consider paying a structural engineer to take ...


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Post longevity: Concrete, below frostline (varies with where you are), with a footing, reinforced with steel rebar kept 2" from the face of the concrete. Use brackets or pads to keep wood from touching concrete aboveground. Hole: Cheap, or Lazy? Cheap - post hole digger (clamshell type) or mattock and shovel (depends how hard the clay is when you try to ...


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You're going to want to remove the trim joist, and let the new joists rest on the support beam. The other end of the joists will rest on whatever new support structure you add.


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The purpose of a ledger board is to give you surface onto which you can nail/attach the rest of the deck (and flashing to keep water out of a house- usually). Your question is, do you need it for attaching two decks. I think the answer to this is a decision for personal convenience, tools, or need. I personally don't undersand the use of a ledger board here ...


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Yes, it's common to have deck posts at irregular intervals for various reasons--basement windows and doors, landscape features, sidewalks, etc. The important consideration is that each span is designed properly for load. It may be the case that you have beams of differing size.


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here in ontario, you are not permitted to use 4x4 posts on a deck, and nor should you. use 6x6 and make sure they sit on metal brackets to connect them to the concrete posts. bearing in mind everything about structural design is based on local conditions and materials used, i would offer this... 4x8 beams at max 5 ft centers would be plenty strong here ...


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Ordinarily, I'd get 10% extra for a job like you describe. Given the custom setup, I'd seriously consider 15%, and maybe maybe if it wasn't outrageously cost-prohibitive, going for 20%. Splits, knots, and if you live in my world, mis-cuts happen. It would break my heart to have to go back for one more stick... Plus, if you get way too much, then you'll ...



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