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6

It would be best to use two. If you make sure your deck boards are cupped down you would think that only one screw would be fine, to stop the board from cupping up in the center. I have seen wood cup in some extremely odd ways so this is not always the case. Two per board/joist intersection will ensure you do not need to mess with it in the future. Or you ...


5

Based on questions answered in chat you have a case where the contractor didn't measure the deck properly, and built it too high, could not flash properly under the door frame, and performed a "some genius" move putting a transition strip (meant for interior use) over top of the door frame and the vinyl, with caulk under neath. Stupid. Two options: 1 ...


5

The jury is still out on these types of products. I was at a contractors day at my local Lowes and the rep from one of the manufactures of the epoxy style coverings was there demonstrating the product. The end result was a smooth, not sandy, but mottled non skid finish. the dried samples on display revealed about an 1/8" coating on the wood. I did spend a ...


4

Simple really assuming you have the proper tools. Cut your 4x4's to 18 inch length Build a frame Attach to the 4x4 posts Cut wood to fit the surface of the frame Add lateral support to the 4x4 posts To join 2 benches at a corner, figure out your corner angle and modify the plans to match. Wooden Bench Plans Website


3

The 45 degree decking is the primary sub-floor. It's a technique that was widely used in the past, but has subsequently been replaced with simply dropping sheets of plywood down. In answer to your questions: 1) You can glue and screw to the sub-floor. 2) In this case, it doesn't matter. The sub-floor is carrying the load diagonally. However, if there ...


3

First, a disclaimer: Make sure the wood you are going to use will stand up in the environment you're placing them in. You may be better off using these with the T&G on an indoor project. Weather outside will quickly weather non-pressure treated wood, and decks typically require thicker boards than you'd have inside since they don't have a sub-floor. For ...


3

Without pictures and maybe a diagram of some kind it's impossible to give you exact advice, so I'll give you more general. Decking is something you want to last for years, and if done right will add value to your home. Done wrong at the beginning it is likely to get worse over time, and could detract from your property later. It may be that you can fix the ...


3

Wolmanized wood is a subsection of pressure treated wood. There are many different processes that fall in the preserved wood category and Wolmanized wood used a copper azole process. It is manufactured by Arch wood products.


2

I think they address the biggest single problem with wooden decking, the effects of sun and water on horizontal surfaces. Application over rotten wood, damp wood, etc, will likely cause failures of the coatings (or any coating, for that matter) That said, there are other deck problems that the coatings DON'T address: Too tight spacing of deck boards , ...


2

Contact the ChoiceDek folks; all manufacturers have technical support to answer just that kind of questions.


2

Before you start with a sander, I would try a power washer. These can be rented from a big box store for a day or two. If you have several projects, consider purchase. You do need to be careful since the force of the water is strong enough to cause injury if mishandled. Also, do not try to powerwash very soft woods such as redwood or cedar. It is amazing ...


2

Where I live old floor boards are like gold bricks. I had to replace a few boards in a house built in the 1920's and to get boards that matched was like $20 / linear meter. And that was just for ratty old baltic pine, with nail holes and dents and stains. Consider selling the boards and buying new hardwood decking with the proceeds.


1

So long as the installation meets the engineered design [and the design was properly engineered], the sole reason to choose one spacing over another is cost. In some cases larger spacing will require an upgrade to supplementary structural components such as framing anchors or increased straps or additional nails. The only way to know if there is a difference ...


1

I think your goal should be to have the deck a couple of inches below the bottom of the siding. If you use 2x6 joists, you'll need 5.5" plus the width of the decking, so you'll have to dig out the grass enough to get that depth. There are two ways to deal with the concrete pad. You could put a 2x4 on it's side and shim it up with pressure-treated shims ...


1

I can't find a floor joist span table that goes smaller than a 2x6. However, the American Wood Council calculator gives an allowable span for #2 Southern Douglas Fir 2x4s (~35mm x ~90mm) at 16" (405mm) centers at 5',8" (~1750mm) with a wet condition 10lb dead load and 40lb live load. If the dimension measurement is accurate, the joists wouldn't get past ...


1

Since it's 40-year-old hardwood, you need a good blade and a strong motor - that means a table saw in my book. I do not think you will get great results with a circular saw. The best tool for rounding over the edges is a router. It will be hard to get consistent results with a belt sander, and it will be slow work with hardwood.


1

I have used and liked the EB-TY system... Last I used it, there were only 3 models (before Simpson acquired them There are other products available for grooved composites... ChoiceDek recommends Mantis 396 Tigerclaw is another, TC-G


1

I wouldn't even consider using a 4x4 post on a deck that big unless it was more of a patio. First most code requires 6x6 or greater for decks. Then you could have some huge warping issues with 4x4s - if you used them and they are more than a couple of feet you better strap then. Also you can notch the 6x6s for rails and stuff - you won't be able to ...


1

We put one of these on our deck last summer. They are essentially latex pain mixed with very fine sand. Our deck was in OK shape we had some boards with cracks and splinters in them but generally alright. The recommended application thickness was far too thick for me and I ended up adding water to it. The end result turned out alright, the paint filled in ...


1

In regards to flashing the full width of the deck: Instead of flashing the entire width of the deck, usually the vinyl would go up the wall several inches. If this is not the case, and there is also no flashing, I would call a vinyl guy (not the same one who is responsible for this atrocity) to come in and do that. they should be able to look after this, ...


1

It is not officially recommended, and any chart you will find will list 16" as max span (I've even seen a couple that said 12"). As far as safety goes, it would feel a little "bouncy" to an adult but I'd like to sit back with a beer and watch you try to break it.


1

Before writing anything else, let me warn you that I'm not a structural engineer, and I don't claim any competence in these matters. I'm just some random guy on the Internet. Because I couldn't find a good load table (at least not quickly), I tried to calculate deflection and bending stress, and I can't see anything wrong with using 5/4" x 6" cedar boards ...



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